1

Here is the test result

TEST: Test description
PASS: test case description
PASS: test case description
PASS: test case description
FAIL: failure description

I am trying to convert this test result into XML format like this

<testsuite tests="Test description">
    <testcase result="PASS" description="test case description"/>
    <testcase result="PASS" description="test case description"/>
    <testcase result="PASS" description="test case description"/>
    <testcase result="FAIL">
        <failure> details about failure </failure>
    </testcase>
</testsuite>

How would I do so in Bash?

  • 1
    Hi pal, generally you would show what you've tried, and ask SO for help with any errors you're getting. However - sed/ awk are your friends here, you can jimmy stuff together with a for statement and echo's if you really wanted. How are you getting the output above? – itChi Sep 26 '18 at 16:21
  • 1
    Hi Matt, you need to show your work. The community is very helpful when you put forth effort on your own to solve your problem. As @itChi said, sed and awk are your friends. Give that a try and edit your question to show what you've tried. – kenlukas Sep 26 '18 at 16:35
2

While you can do everything directly with in a single go, I would suggest using some form of XML converter such as . The reason is that XML has a lot of subtleties and is more than an ASCII file with a funny format.

The approach I would take here is to create from your ASCII file into a simply Pyx format and then use to do the magic:

Creating the Pyx file: The PYX format is extremely simple to describe and understand. The first character on each line identifies the content-type of the line. Content does not directly span lines, although successive lines might contain the same content-type. In the case of tag attributes, the attribute name and value are simply separated by a space, without the use of extra quotes. The prefix characters are:

( start-tag
) end-tag
A attribute
- character data (content)
? processing instruction

So having this knowledge we can write the following simple (stored in a2pyx.awk)

BEGIN{FS=": *"}
($1=="TEST") && (NR>1) { print ")testsuite" } # close testsuite node
($1=="TEST") { print "(testsuite"             # open testsuite node
               print "Atests", $2  }          # attribute tests
($1=="PASS") { print "(testcase"              # open testcase-pass node
               print "Aresult PASS"           # attribute result
               print "Adescription",$2        # attribute description
               print ")testcase" }            # close testcase node
($1=="FAIL") { print "(testcase"              # open testcase-fail node
               print "Aresult FAIL"           # attribute result
               print "(failure"               # open failure node
               print "-"$2                    # add content
               print ")failure"               # close failure node
               print ")testcase" }            # close testcase node
END          { print ")testsuite" }           # close last testsuite node

Which outputs as awk -f a2pyx.awk /path/to/file

(testsuite
Atests Test description
(testcase
Aresult PASS
Adescription test case description
)testcase
(testcase
Aresult PASS
Adescription test case description
)testcase
(testcase
Aresult PASS
Adescription test case description
)testcase
(testcase
Aresult FAIL
(failure
-failure description
)failure
)testcase
)testsuite

Convert PYX into XML: Now you have a way to create a PYX-file. So now you can use to convert it into an XML by simply doing:

awk -f a2pyx.awk /path/to/file | xmlstarlet p2x | xmlstarlet fo -R -

The first xmlstarlet converts it into a single line XML, the second version reformats it into a valid XML. The output is:

<?xml version="1.0"?>
<testsuite tests="Test description">
  <testcase result="PASS" description="test case description"/>
  <testcase result="PASS" description="test case description"/>
  <testcase result="PASS" description="test case description"/>
  <testcase result="FAIL">
    <failure>failure description</failure>
  </testcase>
</testsuite>
  • Thanks for showing this, I wasn't aware of pyx – glenn jackman Sep 26 '18 at 17:01
  • @glennjackman PYX is very powerful when you want to start using any of the common Unix tools on an XML file (such as grep, sed, awk, ...). Just do XML to PYX, then perform your operations and move it back from PYX to XML. Sometimes it beats coming up with a very intricate XPath. – kvantour Sep 26 '18 at 17:05
  • Good answer for a terrible question! ;) – miken32 Sep 26 '18 at 19:38
0

Here's a rough stab at it in awk.

awk -F": " -v dq='"' '$1=="TEST"{printf "%s\n", "<testsuite tests="dq$2dq">"}$1=="PASS"{printf "\t%s\n", "<testcase result="dq$1dq" description="dq$2dq" />"}$1=="FAIL"{printf "\t%s\n\t\t%s\n\t%s\n","<testcase result="dq$1dq">", "<failure>"$2"<failure>", "</testcase>"}END{print "</testsuite>"}' inputfile

example:

~$ cat input
TEST: Test description
PASS: test case description
PASS: test case description
PASS: test case description
FAIL: failure description
~$ awk -F": " -v dq='"' '$1=="TEST"{printf "%s\n", "<testsuite tests="dq$2dq">"}$1=="PASS"{printf "\t%s\n", "<testcase result="dq$1dq" description="dq$2dq" />"}$1=="FAIL"{printf "\t%s\n\t\t%s\n\t%s\n","<testcase result="dq$1dq">", "<failure>"$2"<failure>", "</testcase>"}END{print "</testsuite>"}' input
<testsuite tests="Test description">
        <testcase result="PASS" description="test case description" />
        <testcase result="PASS" description="test case description" />
        <testcase result="PASS" description="test case description" />
        <testcase result="FAIL">
                <failure>failure description<failure>
        </testcase>
</testsuite>
0

One edge case to worry about is if the descriptions contain quotes:

$ cat results
TEST: Test description
PASS: test case description
PASS: "test case" description
PASS: test case description
FAIL: failure description "with quotes"

some bash

close_suite=false
while IFS=" :" read -r item value; do
    case $item in 
        TEST) printf '<testsuite tests="%s">\n' "${value//\"/&quot;}"; close_suite=true ;; 
        PASS) printf '<testcase result="PASS" description="%s"/>\n' "${value//\"/&quot;}" ;; 
        FAIL) printf '<testcase result="FAIL"><failure>%s</failure></testcase>\n' "$value" ;; 
    esac
done < results
$close_suite && echo '</testsuite>'
<testsuite tests="Test description">
<testcase result="PASS" description="test case description"/>
<testcase result="PASS" description="&quot;test case&quot; description"/>
<testcase result="PASS" description="test case description"/>
<testcase result="FAIL"><failure>failure description "with quotes"</failure></testcase>
</testsuite>
  • To prettify the XML, I'd pass this output through something like | xmlstarlet format – glenn jackman Sep 26 '18 at 16:44
0

SGML can parse your test result log directly as markup, and then format it to canonical XML form. To make it do that, you tell SGML to replace the start of each line (RS = "record- start" in SGML terminology) by the characters <test-case><result>, and to replace the colon : into </result> using short reference declarations, and by allowing to omit the end-element tag for test-case:

<!DOCTYPE test-suite [
  <!ELEMENT test-suite - - (test-case+)>
  <!ELEMENT test-case - O (result,description)>
  <!ELEMENT (result|description) 0 0 (#PCDATA)>
  <!ENTITY start-result '<test-case><result>'>
  <!ENTITY end-result '</result>'>
  <!SHORTREF s '&RS' start-result>
  <!SHORTREF t ':' end-result>
  <!USEMAP s test-suite>
  <!USEMAP t result>
  <!ENTITY yourfile SYSTEM  'name-of-input-file>
]>
<test-suite>
&yourfile;
</test-suite>

You can then invoke, from bash, the osx program (part of the OpenSP/OpenJade package) to produce XML from your input. Note, however, that the result will encode result and description as elements, rather than attributes.

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