2

I am trying to layer my Sql client object calls such that they get disposed of reliably. Something like this:

Open database connection -> Create command -> Read results -> close command -> close database connection

So far this has succeeded when I do all of these things in the same method.

The problem is this is error prone. And a mess to read through.

When I try to create a common method to handle this that cleans up everything and returns a reader the connection gets closed before the reader starts.

//closes connection before it can be read...apparently the reader doesn't actually have any data at that point ... relocating to disposable class that closes on dispose
public SqlDataReader RunQuery(SqlCommand command)
{
    SqlDataReader reader = null;
    using (var dbConnection = new SqlConnection(_dbConnectionString))
    {
        try
        {
            dbConnection.Open();

            command.Connection = dbConnection;

            reader = command.ExecuteReader();  // connection closed before data can be read by the calling method
        }
        catch (Exception e)
        {
            Console.WriteLine(e.ToString());
        }
        finally
        {
            dbConnection.Close();
        }
    }

    return reader;
}

I can get around this by creating my own class that implements IDispose (etc) but then when I wrap it with the same using statement it takes up just as many lines as a database connection using statement.

How can I take care of the data base connection in a repeatable class that takes care of all these artifacts and closes the connection?

  • What kind of data are your trying to read? Can it be stored in a list or dictionary? – Kevin K. Sep 26 '18 at 20:25
  • @KevinK.Yes I could. Sometimes I'm only returning 1 thing, but it could go in a list. – micahhoover Sep 26 '18 at 20:27
  • You should close the reader before connection is closed. So you should dispose all the objects after the data is received. – Eugene Sep 26 '18 at 20:28
  • @Eugene : Thanks. That's what I suspected ... so there's no way to make a reusable method that tucks away all/most of the nested using statements? – micahhoover Sep 26 '18 at 20:31
  • I would design solution, which will read all the date inside and return data set. If it is not possible, you can try different approached to access the data. For example LINQ – Eugene Sep 26 '18 at 20:33
1

so there's no way to make a reusable method that tucks away all/most of the nested using statements?

There is a specific pattern supported for returning a DataReader from a method, like this:

static IDataReader GetData(string connectionString, string query)
{
    var con = new SqlConnection(connectionString);
    con.Open();
    var cmd = con.CreateCommand();
    cmd.CommandText = query;
    var rdr = cmd.ExecuteReader(CommandBehavior.CloseConnection);
    return rdr;
}

Then you can call this method in a using block:

    using (var rdr = GetData(constr, sql))
    {
        while (rdr.Read())
        {
            //process rows
        }
    } // <- the DataReader _and_ the connection will be closed here
  • Yes !! This is so trim and slim. Works great. – micahhoover Sep 27 '18 at 15:02
3

You could create a class that holds an open database connection that is reusable, but I suggest reading the data into a list and returning the result:

public List<object> RunQuery(SqlCommand command)
{
    List<object> results = new List<object>();
    using (var dbConnection = new SqlConnection(_dbConnectionString))
    {
        try
        {
            dbConnection.Open();

            command.Connection = dbConnection;
            using (SqlDataReader reader = command.ExecuteReader())
            {
                while (reader.Read())
                {
                    // Repeat for however many columns you have
                    results.Add(reader.GetString(0));
                }
            }
        }
        catch (Exception e)
        {
            Console.WriteLine(e.ToString());
        }
    }

    return results;
}

I don't know the structure of your data, but the important point is that you need to read your data (reader.GetString does this) before you dispose of the connection. You can find more information on how to properly read your data here.

Edit: As mentioned, I removed your finally statement. This is because your using statement is essentially doing the same thing. You can think of a using statement as a try-finally block. Your disposable object will always be disposed after the using statement is exited.

  • 1
    You have correctly removed the erroneous finally statement, but not mentioned that you did so, or why? – Philip Smith Sep 26 '18 at 21:45

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