I'm trying to perform some basic cellular automata on compute shader (DirectCompute) but without double buffering, so I'm using unordered access view to a RWTexture2D<uint> for the data, however I'm having some really strange hang/crash here, I could make a very small snippet that produces the issue:

int w = 256;
for (int x = 0; x < w; ++x)
{
    for (int y = 1; y < w; ++y)
    {
        if (map[int2(x, y - 1)])
        {
            map[int2(x, y)] = 10;
            map[int2(x, y-1)] = 30;
        }
    }
}

where map is RWTexture2D<uint>.

If I remove the if or one of the assignments, it works, I thought it could be some kind of limit so I tried looping just 1/4 of the texture but the problem persists. That code is dispatched with (1,1,1) and kernel numthreads is (1,1,1) too, in my real-world scenario I want to loop from bottom to top and fill the voids (0) with the pixel I'm currently looping (think of a "falling sand" kind of effect), so it can't be parallel except in columns since it depends on the bottom pixel.

I don't understand what is causing the shader to hang though, there's no error or anything, it simply hangs and never not even times out.

EDIT: After some further investigation, I came across something really intriguing; when I pass that w value in a constant buffer it all works fine. I have no idea what would cause that, maybe it's some compiling optimization that went wrong, maybe it tries to unroll the loop what causes some issue, and passing the value in a constant buffer disables that, however I'm compiling the shaders in debug with no optimization so I don't know.

I've had issues declaring variables in global scope like this before. I believe it's because it's not static const (so declare as a static const and it should work). Most likely, it's treating it as a constant buffer (with some default naming) and the contents are undefined since you're not binding a buffer, which causes undefined results. So the following code should work:

static const int w = 256;
for (int x = 0; x < w; ++x)
{
    for (int y = 1; y < w; ++y)
    {
        if (map[int2(x, y - 1)])
        {
            map[int2(x, y)] = 10;
            map[int2(x, y-1)] = 30;
        }
    }
}
  • Thanks. I don't know what's going on and I guess it could be a problem elsewhere, I asked that on gamedev.net though, which I think is a much better place for that question and one of the DirectX devs ended up replying, unfortunately we couldn't reach a conclusion though and I really didn't have the time to make a repro case, here is the link in case you're interested: gamedev.net/forums/topic/… from now on I'll prioritize gamedev.net for questions btw, I really liked it much better than SO for that kind of question – Alan Oct 2 at 22:28
  • I'm pretty sure the compiler generates a constant buffer on the global, and it's undefined. You could run the shader through reflection and see what buffers it consumes. I've definitely encountered exactly this issue before and static const fixed it. – Varrak Oct 2 at 22:38

Your Answer

By clicking "Post Your Answer", you acknowledge that you have read our updated terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy, and that your continued use of the website is subject to these policies.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.