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How do you implement entity framework core classes properly to support a many to many relationship between two classes but the array/data of those classes and relationships is coming from 2 or more data sources.

That is to say if we had a simple relationship such as:

public class Post
{
    public int PostId { get; set; }
    public string Title { get; set; }
    public string Content { get; set; }

    public List<PostTag> PostTags { get; set; }
}

public class Tag
{
    public string TagId { get; set; }

    public List<PostTag> PostTags { get; set; }
}

public class PostTag
{
    public int PostId { get; set; }
    public Post Post { get; set; }

    public string TagId { get; set; }
    public Tag Tag { get; set; }
}

Our server is going to get an array of Posts, Tags, and any of their relationships from two more or data sources via a web api. So if we were simply to try to take the data directly and serialize it back into our database there would be collisions with the Id Key's given the 2 or more different sources. What is the proper way to store difference sources of the same class structure and also to not lose the relationship information? thank you

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  • This is quite a broad question. In fact you're asking: how do I handle concurrency? – Gert Arnold Sep 27 '18 at 7:10
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    I think Post should contain List<Tag> not List<PostTag> – vivek nuna Sep 27 '18 at 7:12
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    @viveknuna No, EF-core doesn't support that as many-to-many relationship. – Gert Arnold Sep 27 '18 at 13:05
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    @GertArnold I was thinking of doing something like: public class RepoPost : Post { [Key] public int Id { get; set; } } that way to add an extra Id key to use as the actual DB key and then fix up the imported data and relationships but it seems that is not really possible once you have a many to many relationship. – Paul W. Sep 27 '18 at 23:21
  • It is. Look at the answer bellow. – bleepzter Sep 28 '18 at 7:02
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What you are missing a conversion layer. Let me explain.

Your post object stored in the database has to have the following structure:

Post Table

+------------+----------------+-------+----------+
| PostId     | ExternalPostId | Title | Content  |
+------------+----------------+-------+----------+
  • PostId - This is the primary key within your own table. Auto-generated, required.
  • ExternalPostId - this is the PostId as it arrives from the API.
  • Title - this is the title as it arrives from the API
  • Content - this is the content as it arrives from the API.

Tag table

+--------+---------------+-------------+-------------+
| TagId  | ExternalTagId | OtherField1 | OtherField2 |
+--------+---------------+-------------+-------------+
  • TagId - This is the primary key of your own Tag table. Autogenerated, required.
  • ExternalTagId - this is the TagId as it arrives from the API
  • OtherField1, OtherField2 - whatever other fields arrive with the tag from the API.

Join Table

+------------+-------+
| PostId     | TagId |
+------------+-------+
  • PostId, TagId - Composite Primary key
  • PostId - foreign key, required, non-auto-numbered referencing the Post table.
  • TagId - foreign key, required, non-auto-numbered referencing the Tag table.

At that point your entities will look like this:

Post Enity

[Table("Post")]
public class DbPost {

  [Key]
  [Column("PostId")]
  public int Id { get; set; }

  [Column("ExternalPostId")]
  public int ExternalId { get; set; }

  [Column("Title")]
  public string Title { get; set; }

  [Column("Content")]
  public string Content { get; set; }

  public IList<PostTag> PostTags { get; set; }
}

Tag entity:

[Table("Tag")
public class DbTag
{
    [Key]
    [Column("TagId")]
    public int Id { get; set; }

    [Column("ExternalTagId")]
    public string ExternalId { get; set; }

    public IList<PostTag> PostTags { get; set; }
}

PostTag Entity This entity stays the same. The difference here is that PostId is mapped to the Id property of the Post entity, which is your own primary key of your own Post table. In a similar fashion the TagId is mapped to the Id property of the Tag table, which is also your own primary key, of your own table.

public class DbPostTag
{
  public int PostId { get; set; }
  public Post Post { get; set; }

  public int TagId { get; set; }
  public Tag Tag { get; set; }
}

Finally, your domain context:

public class Database : DbContext {
  public virtual DbSet<DbPost> Posts { get; set; }
  public virtual DbSet<DbTag> Tags { get; set; }
  public virtual DbSet<DbPostTag> PostTags { get; set; }
  ...
}

When you insert a post from the API you need to create a translation between the post from the API to the post entity in your database. You can do so via an extension method or a method that translates this for you:

public static class ApiObjectExtensions {

    public static DbPost ToDbPost(this Post post){
      var dbPost = new DbPost(){
        ExternalId = post.PostId,
        Title = post.Title,
        Content = post.Content,
        PostTags = new List<DbPostTags>()
      };
    }

    public static DbTag ToDbTag(this Tag tag){
      return new DbTag(){ 
        ExternalId = tag.Id,
        PostTags = new List<DbPostTags>()
      };

    }
  }

So when you are inserting the data in the domain context you simply have to convert the corresponding entities. This code assumes that you really have the object graph described above and your post has a bunch of post tags, and the each post tag has a bunch of tags.

foreach(var post in posts){

  var dbPost = post.ToDbPost();

  if(post.PostTags != null && post.PostTags.Any()){

    foreach(var postTag in post.PostTags){

      if(postTag.Tag != null){

         var dbTag = postTag.Tag.ToDbTag();

         var dbPostTag = new DbPostTag(){
           Post = dbPost,
           Tag = dbTag
         };

         dbPost.PostTags.Add(dbPostTag);
      }
    }
  }

  Database.DbPosts.Add(dbPost);
}

Database.SaveChanges();

If you are receiving the posts, the post tags, and the tags in separate calls than your insert operation will be a bit different:

var insertedPosts = new List<DbPost>();
var insertedTags = new List<DbTag>();

foreach(var post in posts){
  var dbPost = post.ToDbPost();
  Database.Posts.Add(dbPost);
  insertedPosts.Add(dbPost);
}

foreach(var tag in tags){
  var dbTag = tag.ToDbTag();
  Database.Tags.Add(dbTag);
  insertedTags.Add(dbTag);
}
Database.SaveChanges(); 

This will write all db post and db tag entities to the db and assign their primary keys. The next step would be to link the two together.

foreach(var postTag in postTags){
  var dbPost = insertedPosts.FirstOrDefault(p => p.ExternalId = postTag.PostId);
  var dbTag = insertedTags.FirstOrDefault(t => t.ExternalId = postTag.TagId);

  if(dbPost != null && dbTag != null){
    var dbPostTag = new DbPostTag(){
      PostId = dbPost.Id,
      Tag = dbTag.Id
    };
    Database.PostTags.Add(dbPostTag);
  }
}
Database.SaveChanges();

The last piece is when you retrieve the data back and you want it in the original format. The following query will return all posts, their linking entities, and their tags:

var dbPosts = this.Database.Posts
    .Include( p => p.PostTags )
    .ThenInclude(pt => pt.Tag )
    .ToList();

var apiPosts = dbPosts.Select(p => p.ToApiPost()).ToList();

To convert the stuff back to the original Post, PostTag, and Tag types you can simply create extension methods as follows:

public static class DbObjectExtensions {
  public static Post ToApiPost(this DbPost dbPost){
    var post = new Post(){
      PostId = dbPost.ExternalId,
      Title = dbPost.Title,
      Content = dbPost.Content,
      PostTags = new List<PostTag>()
    };

    if(dbPost.PostTags != null) {
       foreach(var dbPostTag in dbPost.PostTags){
         if(dbPostTag.Tag != null){
           var tag = dbPostTag.Tag.ToApiTag();
           var postTag = new PostTag(){
             PostId = post.PostId,
             Post = post,
             TagId = tag.TagId,
             Tag = tag
           };
           post.PostTags.Add(postTag);
           tag.PostTags.Add(postTag);
         }
       }
    }
    return post;
  }

  public static Tag ToApiTag(this DbTag dbTag){
    return new Tag(){
      TagId = dbTag.ExternalId
    };
  }
}
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