14

I have the following query:

WITH cteCountryLanguageMapping AS (
    SELECT * FROM (
        VALUES
            ('Spain', 'English'),
            ('Spain', 'Spanish'),
            ('Sweden', 'English'),
            ('Switzerland', 'English'),
            ('Switzerland', 'French'),
            ('Switzerland', 'German'),
            ('Switzerland', 'Italian')
    ) x ([Country], [Language])
)
SELECT
    [Country],
    CASE COUNT([Language])
        WHEN 1 THEN MAX([Language])
        WHEN 2 THEN STRING_AGG([Language], ' and ')
        ELSE STRING_AGG([Language], ', ')
    END AS [Languages],
    COUNT([Language]) AS [LanguageCount]
FROM cteCountryLanguageMapping
GROUP BY [Country]

I was expecting the value inside Languages column for Switzerland to be comma separated i.e.:

  | Country     | Languages                                 | LanguageCount
--+-------------+-------------------------------------------+--------------
1 | Spain       | Spanish and English                       | 2
2 | Sweden      | English                                   | 1
3 | Switzerland | French, German, Italian, English          | 4

Instead I am getting the below output (the 4 values are separated by and):

  | Country     | Languages                                 | LanguageCount
--+-------------+-------------------------------------------+--------------
1 | Spain       | Spanish and English                       | 2
2 | Sweden      | English                                   | 1
3 | Switzerland | French and German and Italian and English | 4

What am I missing?


Here is another example:

SELECT y, STRING_AGG(z, '+') AS STRING_AGG_PLUS, STRING_AGG(z, '-') AS STRING_AGG_MINUS
FROM (
    VALUES
        (1, 'a'),
        (1, 'b')
) x (y, z)
GROUP by y

  | y | STRING_AGG_PLUS | STRING_AGG_MINUS
--+---+-----------------+-----------------
1 | 1 | a+b             | a+b

Is this a bug in SQL Server?

  • 1
    Seems to be a bug, it's always returning the 1st STRING_AGG no matter how you write the CASE – dnoeth Sep 27 '18 at 9:23
  • 1
    This is a beauty of an optimizer bug. Simpler and more striking repro: CASE COUNT([Language]) WHEN 1234567 THEN STRING_AGG([Language], ' and ') ELSE STRING_AGG([Language], ', ') END AS [Languages] (uses the 1234567 case) and CASE COUNT([Language]) WHEN 1234567 THEN STRING_AGG([Language], ' and ') END AS [Languages] (leave out ELSE -- now the match fails and the expression becomes NULL). No matter what the "correct" result should be, surely that's not it. – Jeroen Mostert Sep 27 '18 at 9:25
  • 1
    Not sure this is appropriate, but....LOL! Since this is not a lack of knowledge on your part, rather than a real thing that many would come across, I strongly recommend changing the question title to be more accurate than a generic "not working as intended", in order to maximize benefit for all. – George Menoutis Sep 27 '18 at 9:35
  • In the resulting execution plan, the second STRING_AGG is entirely missing and instead the expression is rebound to the first one, as if the CASE had said STRING_AGG([Language], ' and ') twice. Any subsequent CASEs are absorbed as well. Looks like something very weird is going on with subexpression elimination. – Jeroen Mostert Sep 27 '18 at 9:35
  • 1
    This bug seems to be specifically tuned to STRING_AGG. If the ELSE is changed to 'blargh' + STRING_AGG(...), you'll get 'blarghFrench and German..., so it improperly unifies the second STRING_AGG with the first. The simplest workaround is to change the ELSE expression to STRING_AGG([Language] + '', ', ') -- this defeats CSE, suggesting there's a bug where CSE ignores the second argument to STRING_AGG. – Jeroen Mostert Sep 27 '18 at 9:42
15

Yes, this is a Bug (tm), present in (as of writing) versions up to SQL Server 2017 CU12 (but not, according to @DanGuzman, in Azure SQL Database, so apparently it's already fixed and the fix could land in the next CU). Specifically, the part in the optimizer that performs common subexpression elimination (ensuring that we don't calculate expressions more than necessary) improperly considers all expressions of the form STRING_AGG(x, <separator>) identical as long as x matches, no matter what <separator> is, and unifies these with the first calculated expression in the query.

One workaround is to make sure x does not match by performing some sort of (near-)identity transformation on it. Since we're dealing with strings, concatenating an empty one will do:

SELECT y, STRING_AGG(z, '+') AS STRING_AGG_PLUS, STRING_AGG('' + z, '-') AS STRING_AGG_MINUS
FROM (
    VALUES
        (1, 'a'),
        (1, 'b')
) x (y, z)
GROUP by y
0

Don't repeat yourself*. You are repeating yourself by using MAX(...), LIST_AGG(...', ') and LIST_AGG(...' and '). You could simply rewrite your query like this and might end up with a better plan:

WITH cteCountryLanguageMapping AS (
    SELECT * FROM (
        VALUES
            ('Spain', 'English'),
            ('Spain', 'Spanish'),
            ('Sweden', 'English'),
            ('Switzerland', 'English'),
            ('Switzerland', 'French'),
            ('Switzerland', 'German'),
            ('Switzerland', 'Italian')
    ) x (Country, Language)
), results AS (
    SELECT
        Country,
        COUNT(Language) AS LanguageCount,
        STRING_AGG(Language, ', ') AS Languages
    FROM cteCountryLanguageMapping
    GROUP BY Country
)
SELECT Country, LanguageCount, CASE LanguageCount
    WHEN 2 THEN REPLACE(Languages, ', ', ' and ')
    ELSE Languages
END AS Languages_Fixed
FROM results

Result:

| Country     | LanguageCount | Languages_Fixed                  |
|-------------|---------------|----------------------------------|
| Spain       | 2             | Spanish and English              |
| Sweden      | 1             | English                          |
| Switzerland | 4             | French, German, Italian, English |

DB Fiddle

* I did not want to repeat others as well by saying that it is a bug.

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