2

How do you use nested for loops to print out the following pattern? So you don't have to write 10 for loops for it.

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

2 4 6 8 10 12 14 16 18 20

3 6 9 12 15 18 21 24 27 30

4 8 12 16 20 24 28 32 36 40

5 10 15 20 25 30 35 40 45 50

6 12 18 24 30 36 42 48 54 60

7 14 21 28 35 42 49 54 63 70

8 16 24 32 40 48 56 64 72 80

9 18 27 36 45 54 63 72 81 90

10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100
  • Did my answer help you? If you need more help we can take this into a chat – Capn Jack Sep 28 '18 at 6:12
  • Yeah, but I still don't understand how the multiplying part works. For the first iteration: print((0 + 1) * (0 + 1), end=" ") prints out 1 to 10. But the second iteration: print((1 + 1) * (1 + 1, end=" ") ?? – Yolanda Hui Sep 28 '18 at 6:30
  • Close! The first part will be print((0+1) * (0+1)) = 1, then ONLY count increases, stepSize remains the same because we still haven't finished the inner for loop, so the next number is print((1 + 1) * (0 + 1)) = 2. Then print((2+1) * (0+1)) = 3, and so on... Finally we reach print((9+1) * (0+1) = 10 and then we finish the first iteration of 10 in our stepSize loop. Then we start the next iteration except this time stepSize is one larger. e.g. print((0+1) * (1+1)) = 2, and then print((1+1) * (1+1)) = 4, and then print((2+1) * (1+1)) = 6. See how that works? – Capn Jack Sep 28 '18 at 6:37
  • I see how it works now, thanks! – Yolanda Hui Sep 28 '18 at 7:15
  • Great! Don’t forget to upvote/accept my answer if you liked it to help other people searching for the same thing in the future! – Capn Jack Sep 28 '18 at 7:16
2

Simply increase your step size!

for stepSize in range(10):
    for count in range(10):
        print((count + 1) * (stepSize + 1), end=" ")
    # count loop has ended, back into the scope of stepSize loop
    # We are also printing(" ") to end the line
    print(" ")
# stepSize loop has finished, code is done

Explanation: The first, outer loop is increasing our step size, then for each step size we count up 10 steps and finish the line when we print(" ") in the outer for loop.

  • The + 1s here are used because the for loops will start at 0, and it seems you don't want that. – Capn Jack Sep 28 '18 at 5:11
  • you should add end parameter in 1st print statement. print((i + 1) * (stepsize + 1), end=" ") – AkshayNevrekar Sep 28 '18 at 5:11
  • I don't know how to interpret your codes. I understand that for stepsize in range(10): allows you to print from 0 to 9. I don't understand what does for i in range(10): mean inside the for loop above it. And why is the formula for the output equal to (i + 1) * (stepsize + 1)? – Yolanda Hui Sep 28 '18 at 5:20
  • @YolandaHui I'll break it down line by line. Also, I changed the variable names to be more clear. The first line is a simple for loop counting from 0-9 and if we add +1 to it we get 1-10 which is the desired step size (you want to increment first by 1, then 2, then 3, etc.). The second for loop will run from 0-9 again and again we need to add +1 to it since you want to count from 1-10, not 0-9. This second loop here will run once for every step size (since it's inside of the stepSize for loop). – Capn Jack Sep 28 '18 at 5:41
  • @YolandaHui Finally, within this inner loop we're multiplying the stepSize by the count to get your list. e.g. 1, 2, 3, ..., 10 and then the next stepSize iteration of the for loop gives 2,4,6, ..., 20 and so on. The end=" " simply says that the line will finish when a print(" ") is given, which we do at the end of stepSize loop – Capn Jack Sep 28 '18 at 5:43
0

This is how I would do it:

 for x in range (1,11):
    product = []
    for y in range (1, 11):
        current_product = x * y
        product.append(current_product)
    print(*product, sep=' ')
0

This is going to be one of the least interpretable answers, but I had fun trying to write a one-liner:

num_rows = 10
print '\n\n'.join(' '.join(str(i) for i in range(j,(num_rows+1)*j)[::j]) for j in range(1,num_rows+1))

Output:

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

2 4 6 8 10 12 14 16 18 20

3 6 9 12 15 18 21 24 27 30

4 8 12 16 20 24 28 32 36 40

5 10 15 20 25 30 35 40 45 50

6 12 18 24 30 36 42 48 54 60

7 14 21 28 35 42 49 56 63 70

8 16 24 32 40 48 56 64 72 80

9 18 27 36 45 54 63 72 81 90

10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100

Disecting it, range(j,(num_rows+1)*j)[::j] generates the integers for each line where j is ranging over the row number (starting with an index of 1 as you ask for). The [::j] part gives you every j-th element of the list. Then the inner join statement is constructing the line string from the list of integers, each integer separated by a space ' '. The outer join constructs the final output by combining the lines of integers with \n\n, which is a double new line to put a blank line in between each line of integers.

I think the other solutions are more readable, but this one is kind of fun.

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