23

I think the answer to this is no but, before I make more drastic changes, I want to ensure I haven't missed something.

Is there a means, via CSS only, to alter the justification of an element and its children based on whether it's orientated more towards the left or right of the screen?

There's no straight property for this but I'm seeing if I've missed some hack-like method perhaps involving pseudo selectors or elements.

Demonstration of current predicament:

I have a <ul> nav bar that provides a mixture of <a> links and some nested <ul> containers for drop down menus on hover. Pretty standard and works fine on wider screens:

enter image description here

If there's less screen space available, the nav wraps to the next line as intended. This is a desirable outcome. However, sometimes the drop-down menus can be truncated off-screen, which is not very desirable:

enter image description here

Rather than providing a vastly different style for mobile devices (my fallback plan is to present the drop-down menus as dialog-like choices via postion: fixed on smaller screens, rather than position: absolute as they are now), I could fix my situation through my elements being aware of their adventure off-screen and the need to both text-align: right and to possibly adjust their absolute positioning to anchor to the right of the parent <li> rather than the left, as they are now:

enter image description here

I can manage this via javascript but I've enough listener events already occurring and want to provide a more elegant response that avoids javascript. If there's no css-only method I might use the fixed position alternative as a plan b instead.

Clarifications:

While I was originally expecting to use media queries to solve this predicament on mobile devices, I realised that, though it is only apparent on smaller screen sizes for me, this is not something I can take for granted.

For example, the number of nav items may grow in the future and could present this situation at any screen size. It just needs a drop-down menu to be at the screen right.

I also cannot guarantee that a device I've yet to test is not replicating the issue at a size I hadn't expected it to.

My point being that I don't see a way I can rely on screen size media queries. I think my solution, if any, needs to responsive to the position of the element on the screen — which is why I think I may be out-of-luck for a non-javascript solution.

Secondly: Assume content is dynamic and, like any capable page, elements that should dynamically change properties to accommodate this, do (such as nav item order, count, widths, etc.). I should refer anyone looking for finer caveats in this area to the original question: Is there a means, via CSS only, to alter the justification of an element and its children based on whether it's orientated more towards the left or right of the screen?

Sample Code:

As requested, here is the sample code. I don't think it's a good idea including it in this scenario (though understand it's importance in most questions) as it detracts from the question being mostly unrelated to my specific code and far more related to questioning the ability of css to dynamically modify an attribute(s) based on screen position or awareness of screen edges — in any scenario — hence my preference for illustrating the question.

The code is a simplified version of my own but the question could have been asked with almost any variation of a standard, familiar <ul> navigation menu that provides drop-downs via :hover in CSS.

With that in mind, if you are trying to solve the question by working through my code then I may have described my predicament poorly. I believe I'm pretty well versed in the extents that CSS can currently be pushed to and believe the answer to be 'it's not possible without javascript' but am just ensuring I haven't missed a clever workaround/hack for dynamically altering element attributes via CSS based on screen-position (sorry for repetition of the question - I just want to ensure it's understood, following some comments). Thanks.

<ul class="nav nav__container">

    <li><a class='nav nav__item' href="#">Standard Link</a></li>
    <li><a class='nav nav__item' href="#">Standard Link</a></li>
    <li><a class='nav nav__item' href="#">Standard Link</a></li>
    <li><a class='nav nav__item' href="#">Standard Link</a></li>
    <li class='nav nav__item nav__item--dropdown'><li><a href="#">Dropdown Label</a></li>
        <ul class='nav nav__dropdown'>
            <li><a class='nav nav__item nav__item--dditem' href="#">Dropdown Link</a></li>
            <li><a class='nav nav__item nav__item--dditem' href="#">Dropdown Link</a></li>
            <li><a class='nav nav__item nav__item--dditem' href="#">Dropdown Link</a></li>
        </ul>
    </li>

</ul>
9
  • 1
    Have you tried with flex-flow on CSS ?
    – LPK
    Commented Sep 28, 2018 at 13:47
  • 14
    I just want to compliment you on the way you've carefully explained the question with simple words and very straight-to-the-point illustrations! Wish we had more questions like this. Hope you find the answers you're looking for. Commented Sep 28, 2018 at 14:28
  • @LPK Sorry, I don't think I'm following. Wouldn't that still require a direction to be statically specified? At best, it can rely on media queries but I don't think this is applicable in this case. Thanks anyway. Commented Sep 28, 2018 at 14:50
  • @LazarLjubenović Hah, thanks. That's appreciated. It's purely for the queries survival as I've found the community vetting process for valid questions pretty ruthless in the past. Commented Sep 28, 2018 at 14:51
  • 1
    The essence of this question seems to boil down to this similar Stack Overflow question: stackoverflow.com/questions/11919838/… Commented Oct 5, 2018 at 23:38

4 Answers 4

4
+200

There is indeed a CSS only solution which works exactly as you've presented in your question's attached images. However it may not be a truly complete answer as it depends on one crucial factor - that all your top level menu items have the same width. Now this is the case shown in your attached images, but may not be true of your actual implementation.


Using the CSS3 nth-child selector with the n variable you can target every 3rd, or 4th, etc top level menu item. Targeted items can easily be styled to have their dropdown menus align right. Thus, for a hard-coded solution on a single screen you would count the number of top level menu items in a row and set that as your n multiplier. For example, if your menu wrapped after 6 items, to style the last item of each row you would set something like:

.top-level-item:nth-child(6n) > .dropdown-container > .sub-item {
    float: right;
    clear: right;
}

or however your actual implementation needs to style a right aligned menu.

Of course, this depends on all menu items having the same width. If your menu has more than 2 rows and your menu items have varying widths then you may have a varying number of elements in each row, in which case the nth-child selector wouldn't necessarily target the end child of each row.

Now to make this work for any screen size, if all top level items have the same fixed width, we then need to find out how many items there will be per row regardless of the window's width. Sadly, calc() is too limited for this application. However, if the top items have a fixed width and we know what that width is, we can use a series of @media statements for each case.

For example, lets say that with margins and width together, each top level item has a width of 230px. This means that if the window's width is less than 230 * 3 = 690px, there will be 2 items in each row. If the window's width is less than 230 * 4 = 920px and greater than 690px there will be 3 items in each row. And so on, to the largest window size you think you'll need. Using the above nth-child example, the series of media queries to target each row size would look something like:

@media (max-width: 690px) {
    /* less than 3 items per row */
    .top-level-item:nth-child(2n) > .dropdown-container > .sub-item {
        float: right;
        clear: right;
    }
}
@media (max-width: 920px) and (min-width: 691px) {
    /* less than 4 items per row */
    .top-level-item:nth-child(3n) > .dropdown-container > .sub-item {
        float: right;
        clear: right;
    }
}
@media (max-width: 1150px) and (min-width: 921px) {
    /* less than 5 items per row */
    .top-level-item:nth-child(4n) > .dropdown-container > .sub-item {
        float: right;
        clear: right;
    }
}
...
/* and so on */

A pen that shows an implementation of this is at https://codepen.io/jla-/pen/GYJQMq. Note that the JavaScript is only there to toggle the dropdown menus when they're clicked.


For top level menu items that have variable width, or if they have the same width but you don't know what value it is, I don't think current CSS is powerful enough to do what you want. Ideally you would do something like .top-level-item:nth-child(calc((100vw/--itemwidth)-(100vw%--itemwidth)) to get the number of items in a row, but I think CSS is a very long way off that sort of power.

3
  • 3
    Pedantically, it's an impressive solution but I think you've hinted at your own awareness of its likely inappropriateness with your italicised emphasis. Unfortunately, the question asked, "Is there a means, via CSS only, to alter the justification of an element and its children based on whether it's orientated more towards the left or right of the screen?" is still the pertinent one - unless there's an overlooked exception. Commented Oct 2, 2018 at 9:45
  • @biscuitstack Fair enough, it is a very situational solution. The question is one of the most interesting CSS-only problems I've come across of late, and I hope you find a solution.
    – jla
    Commented Oct 2, 2018 at 23:41
  • 2
    Agreed, I did feel it was a niche situation. Another part of me felt it wasn't and had wide application potential. I'm from a design background rather than dev and sometimes feel that new CSS standards can be slow to cater for age-long design conundrums. While they pretty much all cater to aesthetics (given the nature of CSS) I feel there's a slight bias towards solving functional problems over form. Put another way, I'm often dubious whether many who contribute to the CSS standards have experience with magazine layout, etc. which web often plays catch-up to in terms of trends and needs. Commented Oct 3, 2018 at 9:57
2

May be media query with flex can help you if you use it correctly.. I tried to replicate your problem on jsfiddle.

<div id="menu-container">
  <div class="menu"></div>
  <div class="menu"></div>
  <div class="menu">
      <div id="sub-menu-container">
          <div class="sub-menu" id="sub-menu1"></div>
          <div class="sub-menu" id="sub-menu2"></div>
          <div class="sub-menu" id="sub-menu3"></div>
          <div class="sub-menu" id="sub-menu4"></div>
      </div>
  </div>
  <div class="menu"></div>
</div>

CSS

.menu{
  border-radius:15px;
  background-color: #00ab9e;
  width:120px;
  height:50px;
  border: 1px solid #01eae9;
  display:inline-block;
  margin:5px;
  position:relative;
  vertical-align:top;
}
#sub-menu-container{
  margin-top:50px;
  display: flex;
  flex-flow: column wrap;
  align-items: flex-start;
}
.sub-menu{
  border-radius:15px;
  background-color: #ffb12a;
  width:120px;
  height:50px;
  border: 1px solid #01eae9;
  margin-top:5px;
}
#sub-menu2{
  width:150px;
}

#sub-menu3{
  width:200px;
}

@media only screen and (max-width: 495px) {
    #sub-menu-container {
      align-items: flex-end;
    }
}
@media only screen and (max-width: 420px) {
    #sub-menu-container {
      align-items: flex-start;
    }
}

https://jsfiddle.net/nimittshah/7bsf1r3v/

Thanks

1
  • Thanks. The issue is less with how to change alignment below a screen-size threshold (solvable in a myriad of ways using media queries) and more changing alignment based on an elements on-screen position. See clarification in original question for example. Commented Sep 29, 2018 at 9:39
0

It looks like the answer to the core question:

Is there a means, via CSS only, to alter the justification of an element and its children based on whether it's orientated more towards the left or right of the screen?

is no.

As a more thorough follow-up answer I thought I'd mention that I'm not going with my original plan B of styling drop-down menus to be fixed at smaller screen sizes. I hinted at this in my question but it's become more apparent that I cannot rely on screen size to determine if a drop-down menu will be truncated in the future. So given that media queries are now ruled out, I need another solution if I want to ensure that I don't provide a sloppy solution to any device.

Which leaves me with javascript. I was trying to avoid this but, at this stage, I would be stubborn to do so given the outcome.

Method

Incase it's of use to anybody else, I used jquery to provide a listener for hovering over drop-down menus. The logic is that all elements of a certain class are guaranteed to have a drop-down menu, comprised of a <ul> of another class. So I can target both easily.

I could check if the drop-down menu is to the right or left of the screen. This would work fine. Being picky, I'd rather the menu stay justified to the left unless it's about 200 pixels from the right of the screen - a safe threshold for my dynamic content. I could go and measure each dropdown width and use that as a threshold if I ever run into issues.

Putting all of this together. If I hover over a dropdown menu and it finds itself to be less than 200 pixels from the right of the screen, it will both justify its menu to the right and absolute position the dropdown menu to the right-most side of its parent menu label/trigger (as I showed in my original illustrations). There are more flexible and shorter versions of doing this and it's also not much more work to do without jquery for anyone avoiding the library:

JS Code

$(nav).on('mouseover', '.dropdown', function() {

    var dropdownlist = $(this).children('ul');
    var screenWidth = $(window).width();
    var parentOffsetLeft = $(this).offset().left;
    var spaceRight = screenWidth - parentOffsetLeft;

    if (spaceRight < 200) {

        $(dropdownlist).css('text-align', 'right');
        $(dropdownlist).css('right', '0');
        $(dropdownlist).css('left', 'initial');

    } else {

        $(dropdownlist).css('text-align', 'left');
        $(dropdownlist).css('left', '0');
        $(dropdownlist).css('right', 'initial');

    }

});

Using this javascript, I can recreate the solution illustrated in the question.

-1

Write media-query for your requirement as you want to adjust the text justification. you can change test's justified property inside media-query. use different media-query for different display size according to your requirement, see the example

@media only screen and (max-width: 600px) {
selector {
    property : value;
}
}

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge you have read our privacy policy.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.