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I have an Event Sourcing & async CQRS system. We support a real-world process like:

  • A user is assigned a task which contains X items.
  • As the user completes items they submit commands into the system to change the item's state.
  • When the user is done working they submit a command to close out the task. They are allowed to do this even if all items were not completed.
  • A saga/process-manager react to the task closed event and creates new task(s) containing any items that were not completed by the user.

Since our saga is issuing commands based on which items were not completed, our thinking has been that it's important not to process the task closed command (and produce the task closed event that the saga will react to) until all item completed commands have been processed.

To ensure this we implemented command sequencing. Where the user application gives each command an incrementing ID. The IDs are scoped to teach task. So the first command for each task starts at command 0. When our domain attempts to process a command that does not have the expected next sequence number for the task, we throw an exception and the command is tried again later (it's placed on the back of the message queue).

This works in development, but I have concerns about running this scheme in production. My concerns are twofold:

1) We are reliant on the user application to provide correct sequence numbers for the commands. Users are currently allowed to change devices while working on a task and we have already identified some edge cases where a device switch can cause the command sequence numbers to be incorrect when a user switches to a new device before the read models can be updated.

2) If we lose a command, or are unable to process a command, for any reason we will soft-lock the task. Since the expected sequence number of the domain model of the task will never get pack to number of the missing or unprocessable command.

I have seen that sequencing is the normal approach in ES CQRS systems that have ordering constraints. But the deep dives I have found are usually talking about concerns of the read model and sequence numbers are being generated by the domain at command processing time and paced on events. In our case, we don't want to process the close task command at all if future commands are going to come in for the same task.

My question is: Am I wrong to consider command sequencing as we have implemented it "dangerous" in a production system? And if so, is there a best practice for requirements like ours?

  • I'm interested in a non-tehnical description of the use case because I can't differentiate between problem and solution in your question. – Constantin Galbenu Sep 30 '18 at 16:06
  • Thanks for the feedback @Constantin. Here is the use case with the implementation details removed: 1) A user, using a mobile application, is assigned a task which contains X items. 2) The user uses the app to update the status of the items as they are completed in the real world. 3) When the user is done working on the task they click a button in the app. They can do this even if not all items in the task have been completed. 4) If a user finishes a task with some items still incomplete a new task is created to be assigned to a different user, containing the uncompleted items. – Zach Sep 30 '18 at 20:06
  • what happens when there are no more items? – Constantin Galbenu Sep 30 '18 at 20:50
  • If there are no incomplete items when a user is finished with a task then no new tasks need to be generated. – Zach Oct 1 '18 at 4:36
  • Since our saga is issuing commands based on which items were not completed, our thinking has been that it's important not to process the task closed command (and produce the task closed event that the saga will react to) until all item completed commands have been processed. - I don't understand how did you reach this conclusion. You should do exactly how you described at the beginning of the question, with a Saga reacting to the TaskClosed event. – Constantin Galbenu Oct 1 '18 at 4:46

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