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So this is my "completed" code for my homework assignment which was to modify a program to remove an item from a list and add it to the back of the queue.

I went from Java to Python so I am still having trouble understanding and learning the proper syntax and formatting. I have an error on Line 41 where it keeps saying invalid syntax. What would be a better way to rewrite this? (I will put a comment next to the exact line in the code) Also any formatting help would be deeply appreciated (is there a better way to write a loop, is there too much redundancy, etc), I'm trying my best!

My Code:

class Queue(): 
    def __init__(self):
        self.items = [None] * 10
        self.size_ = 0
        self.front = 0
        self.rear = -1

    def size(self):
        return self.size_

    def isEmpty(self):
        return self.size_ == 0

    def peek(self):
        if self.isEmpty():
            raise Empty('Queue is empty')
        return self.items[self.front]

    def enqueue(self,item):
        self.addRear(item)

    def dequeue(self):
        return self.removeFront()

    def addRear(self, item):
        if self.size_ == len(self.items):
            self.resize(2 * len(self.items))
        avail = (self.rear + 1) % len(self.items)
        self.items[avail] = item
        self.rear = self.rear + 1
        self.size_ += 1

    def addFront(self,item):
        if self.size_ == len(self.items):
            self.resize(2*len(self.items))
        avail = 0
        if self.front == 0:
            if self.rear == -1:
                self.rear = 0
        avail = 0
        else:
            avail = len(self.items) - 1

        else: #################
              ########## Syntax error is here!! Should I rewrite the above as a while loop and then make this into an elif? 

            avail = (self.front - 1) % len(self.items)
        self.items[avail] = item
        self.front = avail
        self.size_ += 1

    def removeFront(self):
        if self.isEmpty():
            raise Empty('Queue is empty')
        answer = self.items[self.front]
        self.items[self.front] = None
        self.front = (self.front + 1) % len(self.items)
        self.size_ -= 1
        return answer

    def removeRear(self):
        if self.isEmpty():
            raise Empty('Queue is empty')
        answer = self.items[self.rear]
        self.items[self.rear] = None
        if self.rear == 0:
            self.rear = len(self.items) - 1
        else:
            self.rear = (self.rear - 1) % len(self.items)
            self.size_ -= 1
        return answer

    def resize(self, cap):
        old = self.items
        self.items = [None] * cap
        walk = self.front
        for k in range(self.size_):
            self.items[k] = old[walk]
            walk = (1 + walk) % len(old)
        self.front = 0
        self.rear = self.size_ - 1


q = Queue()
q.isEmpty()
q.addFront (100)
print(q.size())  
q.addFront (200)
q.addFront (500.58)
print(q.size())  
print(q.peek()) # print the front item of the queue
q.addRear(500)
q.addRear(600)
q.addFront(3.14)
print(q.size())
print(q.peek()) # print the front item of the queue
q.removeFront()
print(q.size())
print(q.peek()) # print the front item of the queue
q.addRear("True")
q.addRear("False")
print(q.size())   
q.isEmpty()   
q.addRear(8.4)
q.removeRear()
print(q.size())
print(q.peek()) # print the front item of the queue
q.addRear("C++")
q.addRear("Python")
q.addRear("Java")
print(q.size())
q.addFront ("Go")
q.addFront ("C")
print(q.size())
print(q.dequeue())
q.removeFront()   
q.removeFront()   
print (q.size())

Okay! If I'm not being specific enough, just let me know. I'm here to learn so anyone who is a master at Python please teach me the art of efficient Python code!

  • 1
    You have 2 else clauses in a row, what would you expect that to mean? – Thierry Lathuille Sep 28 '18 at 20:45
  • @ThierryLathuille no, I know! I know how dumb it looks but even if I use elif, it still says it has a syntax error. I'm super new to python and spend 90% of my time correcting the syntax and formatting, could you suggest a better way to write that? I know its not efficient at all. – Katy Nichols Sep 28 '18 at 21:38
  • Most of what you need can be done with the help of the list's pop() method. pop() gets a value in the indicated index, else, pops the last item in the list. Otherwise, you can use the list's inherent + operator that combines lists into a single list. – Seraph Wedd Sep 29 '18 at 0:48
0

I don't think I can help with editing you code, but the error in you code is that the else: isnt picking any if argument as they are stopped/interrupted by the avail=0 assignment.

If you want to add an item behind a list, you can just use:

li = ['front', 'mid', 'back'] + ['newBack']

whick outputs:

['front', 'mid', 'back', 'newBack']

if you want to add in front, just:

li = ['newFront'] + ['front', 'mid', 'back'] 

which outputs:

['newFront', 'front', 'mid', 'back']

if you want to remove the first item, you can:

li = ['newFront', 'front', 'mid', 'back']
removed = li.pop(0)

where the resulting values would be:

li = ['front', 'mid', 'back']
removed = 'newFront'

note: list.pop(index) is a method that removes the item in the index in the indicated list and returns it, if no index value is inserted, it will remove the last item in the list. pop is useful for queue management.

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