2

I am generating the contents of a Vue component by iterating through a large array of objects. I'd like to use computed properties to determine whether to show certain nodes, but since the computed reference is used inside a loop, I need to be able to set the reference name dynamically.

Below is a notional example of what I'm trying to do. How can I make showItemX change based on the current item?

<template>
  <ul>
    <li v-for="item in myArr" v-if="showItemX">
      {{ item.name }}
    </li>
  </ul>
</template>
<script>
  export default {
    data() {
      return {
        myArr: [{
          id: 'item1',
          name: 'Item 1'
        }, {
          id: 'item2',
          name: 'Item 2'
        }]
      };
    },
    computed: {
      showItem1: function() {
        return this.$store.state.showItem1;
      },
      showItem2: function() {
        return this.$store.state.showItem2;
      }
    }
  }
</script>

2 possible solutions

These are the two routes I've considered so far, but I'm not sure which one would be more efficient or if another way would be preferred:

1. Return a single object for the computed property

In this option, the two computed properties above would be combined into a single property:

computed: {
  showItem: function() {
    return {
      item1: this.$store.state.showItem1,
      item2: this.$store.state.showItem2
    }
  }
}

Then the the v-if would be set to showItem[item.id]:

<li v-for="item in myArr" v-if="showItem[item.id]">
  {{ item.name }}
</li>

The downside here is that it seems that the entire object gets recomputed each time one of the dependencies changes.

2. Use a method to get the corresponding computed property

Here I tried passing item.id to a method as a way to access the corresponding computed property:

computed: {
  item1Show: function() {
    return this.$store.state.showItem1;
  },
  item2Show: function() {
    return this.$store.state.showItem2;
  }
},
methods: {
  showItem: function(id) {
    return this[id + 'Show']
  }
}

And in the template:

<li v-for="item in myArr" v-if="showItem(item.id)">
  {{ item.name }}
</li>

Again, in this example, I'm not sure if I'm fully leveraging the computed properties.


Should one of these options be preferred over the other or is there a better way to accomplish this that I'm missing?

  • I can't tell if this applies to your situation, but maybe stackoverflow.com/a/49032149/392102 – Roy J Oct 1 '18 at 1:34
  • 1
    @RoyJ That leads me to a possibility I hadn't considered. I think I could create a sub-component for each individual item with a single computed property that serves up the right logic based on the current item's id. – Matt Oct 1 '18 at 1:59
0

The nice thing about Vue and JavaScript is that you can use whichever approach suits your needs, but, fwiw, I'd probably find something like the following easiest to understand

<li v-for="item in myArr" v-if="showItem(item)">
    {{ item.name }}
</li>

And then define the showItem method, e.g.

showItem(item) {
    return item.id === "item1" ?
        this.$store.state.showItem1 :
        this.$store.state.showItem2;
}

That assumes you're not using the computed properties anywhere else not shown in the post

  • 1
    My example was way scaled down. I have about 100 items in my array, and dozens of conditionals that at times take several elements from the store into account to determine whether or not to show each item. Your approach does away with computed properties altogether, but doesn't that lose the caching benefit of computed properties? I could definitely throw a switch/case statement into a method to handle all of the logic, but I thought that using computed props would be preferred. – Matt Oct 1 '18 at 1:29
0

There's a better way.

For possible solution #1, you might as well do

<li v-for="(item, index) in myArr" v-if="$store.state['showItem' + (index + 1)]">

Possible solution #2, you completely miss out on Vue's optimizations. The method, while not computationally intensive, will re-run for every element each render.

Below is a solution which fits the specific parameters of your example problem. However, it's not actually what I recommend here. More below.

<template>
      <ul>
        <!--
          `:key` is crucial for performance.
          otherwise, every element will re-render 
          whenever the filtered array updates.
        -->
        <li v-for="item in myFilteredArr" :key="item.id">
          {{ item.name }}
        </li>
      </ul>
</template>

<script>
  export default {
    data: _ => ({
      myArr: [
        {
          id: 'item1',
          name: 'Item 1'
        }, 
        {
          id: 'item2',
          name: 'Item 2'
        }
      ],
    }),

    computed: {
      myFilteredArr () {
        /* 
          abstracting state to a constant avoids 
          re-running the getter functions each iteration
        */
        const state = this.$store.state;
        return this.myArr.filter(
          (item, index) => state['showItem' + (index + 1)]
        );
      }
    }

  }
</script>

My actual recommendation is that you move all this logic into a Vuex getter. You can read about them here: https://vuex.vuejs.org/guide/getters.html .

Since your filtering logic is already being processed in the store, the function which is setting all the showItem's can just be cut and pasted into a Vuex getter, returning myFilteredArr in the same way as above.

This way, there's no component<->store interdependency, and your store's state will be much cleaner.

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