28

I have searched S/O but I couldn't find a answer for this.

When I try to plot a distribution plot using seaborn I am getting a futurewarning. I was wondering what could be the issue here.

import pandas as pd
import numpy as np
import seaborn as sns
import matplotlib.pyplot as plt
% matplotlib inline
from sklearn import datasets

iris = datasets.load_iris()
df = pd.DataFrame(iris.data, columns=iris.feature_names)
df['class'] = iris.target
df['species'] = df['class'].map({idx:s for idx, s in enumerate(iris.target_names)})


fig, ((ax1,ax2),(ax3,ax4))= plt.subplots(2,2, figsize =(13,9))
sns.distplot(a = df.iloc[:,0], ax=ax1)
sns.distplot(a = df.iloc[:,1], ax=ax2)
sns.distplot(a = df.iloc[:,2], ax=ax3)
sns.distplot(a = df.iloc[:,3], ax=ax4)
plt.show()

This is the warning:

C:\ProgramData\Anaconda3\lib\site-packages\scipy\stats\stats.py:1713:
FutureWarning: Using a non-tuple sequence for multidimensional indexing is deprecated; 
use `arr[tuple(seq)]` instead of `arr[seq]`. 
In the future this will be interpreted as an array index, `arr[np.array(seq)]`,
which will result either in an error or a different result.
return np.add.reduce(sorted[indexer] * weights, axis=axis) / sumval

Any help? You can run the above code. You'll get the warning.

Pandas : 0.23.4, seaborn : 0.9.0, matplotlib : 2.2.3, scipy : 1.1.0, numpy: 1.15.0'

7
  • I don't get that warning when running the code. Maybe you want to share which versions of pandas, matplotlib, scipy, numpy and seaborn you are using? I suppose updating them all would prevent this from happening. Oct 1 '18 at 15:26
  • @ImportanceOfBeingErnest Pandas : 0.23.4 and seaborn : 0.9.0, matplotlib : 2.2.3, scipy : 1.1.0, numpy : 1.15.0'
    – user_6396
    Oct 1 '18 at 15:31
  • 1
    Ok this is because of numpy 1.15 in use (I'd not occur with numpy 1.14.6). I might look a bit deeper which package brings up this problem later. Oct 1 '18 at 15:47
  • 1
    So a minimal reproducible example is sns.kdeplot(data = [1,3,4]). This is hence a problem somewhere in seaborn I suppose. Oct 1 '18 at 15:58
  • 1
    No, an older seaborn version will not fix this. To get rid of the warning you can install an older numpy version (e.g. 1.14.6); but the warning is not harmful as of now. One would hope that scipy releases a new version before numpy removes the list support for indexing. I would be pretty confident that this will happen. Oct 1 '18 at 20:19
22

For python>=3.7 you need to upgrade your scipy>=1.2.

2
  • 1
    I agree with this solution. In SciPy 1.2 this works as intended. The warning in previous version was probably due to an incomplete code. Jan 25 '19 at 16:48
  • 1
    In addition to SciPy, this also applies to skimage.
    – mdoc-2011
    May 30 '19 at 16:38
11

A fuller traceback would be nice. My guess is that seaborn.distplot is using scipy.stats to calculate something. The error occurs in

def _compute_qth_percentile(sorted, per, interpolation_method, axis):
    ....
    indexer = [slice(None)] * sorted.ndim
    ...
    indexer[axis] = slice(i, i + 2)
    ...
    return np.add.reduce(sorted[indexer] * weights, axis=axis) / sumval

So in this last line, the list indexer is used to slice sorted.

In [81]: x = np.arange(12).reshape(3,4)
In [83]: indexer = [slice(None), slice(None,2)]
In [84]: x[indexer]
/usr/local/bin/ipython3:1: FutureWarning: Using a non-tuple sequence for multidimensional indexing is deprecated; use `arr[tuple(seq)]` instead of `arr[seq]`. In the future this will be interpreted as an array index, `arr[np.array(seq)]`, which will result either in an error or a different result.
  #!/usr/bin/python3
Out[84]: 
array([[0, 1],
       [4, 5],
       [8, 9]])
In [85]: x[tuple(indexer)]
Out[85]: 
array([[0, 1],
       [4, 5],
       [8, 9]])

Using a list of slices works, but the plan is to depreciate in the future. Indexes that involve several dimensions are supposed to be tuples. The use of lists in the context is an older style that is being phased out.

So the scipy developers need to fix this. This isn't something end users should have to deal with. But for now, don't worry about the futurewarning. It doesn't affect the calculations or plotting. There is a way of suppressing future warnings, but I don't know it off hand.

FutureWarning: Using a non-tuple sequence for multidimensional indexing is deprecated use `arr[tuple(seq)]` instead of `arr[seq]`

3
  • Thanks for the info :) I was thinking it was something that I did was causing the error. Hence I wanted to know what caused the error and how can I fix it.
    – user_6396
    Oct 1 '18 at 18:50
  • This is a good explanation, although no solution was provided. See @NetworkMeister solution - simply upgrade scipy. The bug was fixed in previous releases.
    – mr_mo
    Mar 28 '19 at 9:54
  • 1
    I found this rather confusing. Did they put up some explanation on in what cases the results are different? Because it is said which will result either in an error or a different result.. An error is probably fine because it alerts the user about the issue, but a silent different result concerns me more.
    – Jason
    Feb 7 '20 at 2:04
6

I was running seaborn.regplot, and got rid of the warning by upgrading scipy 1.2 as NetworkMeister suggested.

pip install --upgrade scipy --user

If you still get warnings in other seaborn plots, you can run the following beforehand. This is helpful in Jupyter Notebook because the warnings kind of make the report look bad even if your plots are great.

import warnings
warnings.filterwarnings("ignore")
2

I came across the same warning. I updated scipy,pandas and numpy. I still get it.I get it when i use seaborn.pairplot with kde, which underneath uses seaborn.kdeplot.

If you want to get rid off the warning you can use warnings library. Ex:

import warnings

with warnings.catch_warnings():

    your_code_block
1
  • 1
    Still getting the warning. Mar 19 '21 at 0:23
0

Working example :

import numpy as np
import warnings

x  = np.random.normal(size=100)

with warnings.catch_warnings():
    warnings.simplefilter("ignore")
    
    sns.distplot(x, hist=False, rug=True, color="r");

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.