5

I am playing around with a single container docker image. I would like to store my db password as a secret without using compose (having probs with that and Gradle for now). I thought I could still use secrets even without compose but when I try I get...

$ echo "helloSecret" | docker secret create helloS -

Error response from daemon: This node is not a swarm manager. Use "docker swarm init" or "docker swarm join" to connect this node to swarm and try again.

Why do I need to use swarm mode just to use secrets? Why can't I use them without a cluster?

  • 2
    They're stored in the raft log (which is Swarm specific). You don't need to use compose though (can create everything through the cli). No real downside just to using a single node Swarm. – johnharris85 Oct 2 '18 at 0:50
  • @johnharris85 It just seems counter intuitive, but I am pretty new to docker. I realize that it probably doesn't "hurt" to have a one node swarm I just figured it would add at least a little overhead and I wasn't sure why that was ness for a secret. I will take a look at the raft log though and maybe that will shed some light. Thanks! – Jackie Oct 2 '18 at 1:45
  • but why do you need to use secrets? is it because you what the same code to work in production and development? – Constantin Galbenu Oct 2 '18 at 10:31
  • Eventually yes and I want to make it so I don't have to store EnvVars in the docker file. – Jackie Oct 2 '18 at 15:42
5

You need to run swarm mode for secrets because that's how docker implemented secrets. The value of secrets is that workers never write the secret to disk, the secret is on a need-to-know basis (other workers do not receive the secret until a task is scheduled there), and on managers encrypt that secret on disk. The storage of the secret on the manager uses the raft database.

You can easily deploy a single node swarm cluster with the command docker swarm init. From there, docker-compose up gets changed to docker stack deploy -c docker-compose.yml $stack_name.


Secrets and configs in swarm mode provide a replacement for mounting single file volumes into containers for configuration. So without swarm mode on a single node, you can always make the following definition:

version: '2'
services:
  app:
    image: myapp:latest
    volumes:
    - ./secrets:/run/secrets:ro

Or you can separate the secrets from your app slightly by loading those secrets into a named volume. For that, you could do something like:

tar -cC ./secrets . | docker run -v secrets:/secrets busybox tar -xC /secrets

And then mount that named volume:

version: '2'
volumes:
  secrets:
    external: true
services:
  app:
    image: myapp:latest
    volumes:
    - secrets:/run/secrets:ro
3

Check out this answer: https://serverfault.com/a/936262 as provided by user sel-en-ium :-

You can use secrets if you use a compose file. (You don't need to run a swarm).

You use a compose file with docker-compose: there is documentation for "secrets" in a docker-compose.yml file.

I switched to docker-compose because I wanted to use secrets. I am happy I did, it seems much more clean. Each service maps to a container. And if you ever want to switch to running a swarm instead, you are basically already there.

Unfortunately the secrets are not loaded into the container's environment, they are mounted to /run/secrets/

  • Can you show a working example of docker-compose using a secret? The documentation and even the OP's error message all indicate that the secret will not be configured in the container. – BMitch Jan 31 '19 at 13:55
  • For a working example, the steps in the following answer build on above answer: stackoverflow.com/a/42151570/227926 – therobyouknow Jan 31 '19 at 14:00
  • That example does not use docker-compose, it deploys the secret with swarm mode (see the docker swarm init and docker stack deploy commands). – BMitch Jan 31 '19 at 14:07
  • 1
    Perhaps the confusion is that a compose file is not the same as the docker-compose command. Swarm mode uses the same yaml compose file (with the version 3 syntax), but it deploys the containers very differently. – BMitch Jan 31 '19 at 14:11
  • 1
    Swarm gives you orchestration, fault tolerance, multi node, overlay networking, a routing mesh, and secrets (off the top of my head). Swarm will scale nicely, the big difference with k8s is configurability and extensibility. Swarm mode is a one size fits many solution, really nice if it is your size. – BMitch Jan 31 '19 at 16:50

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