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Let's assume we've simple one->one->many relation with following tables structure:

public class City 
{
  public string Name { get; set; }

  [Column("DtaCentralSchoolId")]
  [ForeignKey("MyCentralSchool")]
  public int? CentralSchoolId { get; set; }

  public CentralSchool MyCentralSchool { get; set; }
}

public class CentralSchool
{
  public string Name { get; set; }

  [InverseProperty("MyCentralSchool")]
  public virtual IList<Student> MyStudents { get; set; }
}

public class Student 
{
  public string Name { get; set; }

  [Column("DtaCentralSchoolId")]
  [ForeignKey("MyCentralSchool")]
  public int? CentralSchoolId { get; set; }

  public CentralSchool MyCentralSchool { get; set; }
}

And trying to run the following query:

var result = await dbContext.Set<City>()
            .AsNoTracking()
            .SelectMany(x => x.MyCentralSchool.MyStudents.DefaultIfEmpty(), (c, s) => new {City = c, Student = s})
            .Where(x => x.Student == null || !x.Student.IsDeleted && x.Student.MyStoreId == storeId)
            .FirstOrDefaultAsync();

So for some reason for CentralSchool INNER JOIN is getting to be generated, while for Student there is LEFT JOIN, which is totally fine, as far as DefaultIfEmpty() is used. Actually I expect LEFT JOIN for CentralSchool as well, so when there is no CentralSchool some rows will be in the result anyway, how can I achieve that in current construction without manually rewriting ugly query and forcing LEFT JOIN to appear?

UPDATE
The issue has been resolved, fix will be released in 2.2: https://github.com/aspnet/EntityFrameworkCore/issues/13511

  • You are trying to retrieve students, not cities. You should probably reverse the query and either include the School and City with each student or select the Student and the corresponding city, eg .Set<Students>().Where(s=>!s.IsDeleted && s.MyStoreId==storeId).Select(s=>new {Student=s,City=student.MyCentralSchool.City});. For this query, it's the School that should have a City property, not the other way around. If you need to access objects both ways, they should refer to each other with proper configuration – Panagiotis Kanavos Oct 2 '18 at 13:00
  • @PanagiotisKanavos, sorry, but I am trying to retrieve exactly cities with students if there are some. This tables structure is just a structure which I use for describing the issue, and question here is more specifically about EF behaviour but not about business logic. – Grigoryants Artem Oct 2 '18 at 14:31
1

One thing stands out, and should be checked in the real code:

.Where(x => x.Student == null || !x.Student.IsDeleted && x.Student.MyStoreId == storeId)

Should this be:

.Where(x => x.Student == null || (!x.Student.IsDeleted && x.Student.MyStoreId == storeId))

Loose conditions like this may trip up EF on the condition x.Student.MyStoreId regardless of whether there is a student or not, resulting in an Inner Join condition.

Edit: I tried reproducing this issue, and with my schema the query does not join on City to Central School. Instead, it joins City through to Student vial the CentralSchoolId FKs. I suspect the issue with your situation is that the database does not have FK's defined? Is the database set up via code-first + migrations, or database first?

Resulting Query:

SELECT TOP (1) 
    [Extent1].[CityId] AS [CityId], 
    [Extent1].[Name] AS [Name], 
    [Extent1].[CentralSchoolId] AS [CentralSchoolId], 
    [Extent2].[StudentId] AS [StudentId], 
    [Extent2].[Name] AS [Name1], 
    [Extent2].[IsDeleted] AS [IsDeleted], 
    [Extent2].[CentralSchoolId] AS [CentralSchoolId1]
    FROM  [dbo].[Cities] AS [Extent1]
    LEFT OUTER JOIN [dbo].[Students2] AS [Extent2] ON [Extent2].[CentralSchoolId] = [Extent1].[CentralSchoolId]
    WHERE ([Extent2].[StudentId] IS NULL) OR ([Extent2].[IsDeleted] <> 1)

Note: In my case I didn't map a StoreId in student, just IsDeleted. Also, the table name was Student2 just due to a name conflict in my existing test area DB.

Entity definitions were identical to yours, except with the PKs mapped, and added IsDeleted to Student.

public class City
{
    [Key]
    public int CityId { get; set; }
    public string Name { get; set; }

    [ForeignKey("MyCentralSchool")]
    public int? CentralSchoolId { get; set; }

    public virtual CentralSchool MyCentralSchool { get; set; }
}

public class CentralSchool
{
    [Key]
    public int CentralSchoolId { get; set; }
    public string Name { get; set; }

    [InverseProperty("MyCentralSchool")]
    public virtual IList<Student> MyStudents { get; set; }
}
[Table("Students2")]
public class Student
{
    [Key]
    public int StudentId { get; set; }
    public string Name { get; set; }

    public bool IsDeleted { get; set; }
    [ForeignKey("MyCentralSchool")]
    public int? CentralSchoolId { get; set; }

    public virtual CentralSchool MyCentralSchool { get; set; }
}

Test expression run:

var result = context.Set<City>()
    .AsNoTracking()
    .SelectMany(x => x.MyCentralSchool.MyStudents.DefaultIfEmpty(), (c, s) => new { City = c, Student = s })
    .Where(x => x.Student == null || !x.Student.IsDeleted)
    .FirstOrDefault();

I ran it Async as well, and the same query was generated. Run with EF6 against SQL Server.

Edit 2: Confirmed that there is a difference in the query generation between EF6 and EF Core. EF Core does produce an inner join between City and Central School when resolving the relationship between City and Student, where EF 6 optimizes this by joining the tables via the common FK. I'd consider raising this as a potential bug in EF Core.

Given you want a list of all active students with their associated students, plus include all cities that have no active student (so all cities will be listed as well)

A work-around, albeit ugly, to return the matching results in EF Core:

var result2 = context.Set<City>()
    .AsNoTracking()
    .SelectMany(x => x.MyCentralSchool.MyStudents.DefaultIfEmpty(), (c, s) => new { City = c, Student = s })
    .Where(x => !x.Student.IsDeleted)
    .Union(context.Set<City>().AsNoTracking().Where(x => x.MyCentralSchool == null || !x.MyCentralSchool.MyStudents.Any(s => !s.IsDeleted))
        .Select(x => new { City = x, Student = (Student)null }))
    .ToList();
| improve this answer | |
  • Thanks for suggestion, I've checked, but unfortunately it doesn't work :( Also I've tried to add x.CentralSchool and null check for that as well - no luck. – Grigoryants Artem Oct 4 '18 at 12:49
  • Ok, this is strange. I've built a test project to see about reproducing the problem and the query generated did not create an inner join, or any join at all between Central School and City for virtually the same Linq expression. I think your problem may be in the database schema. I've edited the answer to outline what I found. – Steve Py Oct 4 '18 at 21:29
  • Checking with EF core, sorry, just saw it in the title, but saw both EF6 and Core in the tags... – Steve Py Oct 4 '18 at 21:41
  • Confirmed... For the same schema, EF Core is generating the Inner Join, EF 6 does not. Interesting. :) – Steve Py Oct 4 '18 at 21:54
  • Thank you very much for being involved! Just opened an issue: github.com/aspnet/EntityFrameworkCore/issues/13511 – Grigoryants Artem Oct 4 '18 at 22:51

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