92

I have a simple model class

export interface Category {

  name: string;
  description: string;

}

I need to declare and initialize a variable in an angular component. Tried:

category: Category = {};

Error: {} is not assignable to a Category

category: Category = new Category();

error: Category refers to a type, but being referred as value..

Any suggestions?

12 Answers 12

164

There are a number of ways to solve this problem, depending on your desired result.

Way 1: Convert your interface to a class

export class Category {
  name: string;
  description: string;
}
const category: Category = new Category();

Way 2: Extend your interface as a class

export class CategoryObject implements Category {
}
const category: Category = new CategoryObject();

Way 3: Fully specify your object, matching the interface

const category: Category = {
  name: 'My Category',
  description: 'My Description',
};

Way 4: Make the properties optional

export interface Category {
  name?: string;
  description?: string;
}

const category: Category = {};

Way 5: Change your variable's type to use Partial<T>

export interface Category {
  name: string;
  description: string;
}

const category: Partial<Category> = {};
4
  • we are going to assign the correct properties later on, just not as part of the initialisation, it looks slightly overkill to do something extra (either of the 5 things you suggested) to just achieve this
    – gaurav5430
    Oct 25, 2021 at 17:44
  • @gaurav5430 The options I have provided all provide the developer and the IDE an accurate description of the data shape. If you are not assigning all properties, then there is some segment of your source code that does not have the properties assigned, and this is where the partial type definitions would apply. If you simply want to side-step the TypeScript type checking (why are you using TypeScript and not JavaScript?), you could assign it as such: const category: Category = {} as any. I do not recommend this and won't add it to my answer. Nov 2, 2021 at 12:24
  • "some segment of the source code that does not have the properties assigned" sure, this should be a problem if I try to use the object before I assign all the properties, but if the properties are assigned on the very next line, ibwould expect typescript to not complain. Again, I am talking about expectations, I understand it might not be possible for typescript to do that by design
    – gaurav5430
    Nov 2, 2021 at 18:00
  • I think easier solution is just let category = <Category>{ }; (just if you are sure, that you'll add all the properties)
    – RamoFX
    Dec 18, 2021 at 13:22
46

If you don't want to change your definition from interface to class, you could also do:

let category = <Category>{ };

Otherwise, you could follow other answers and change your Category to be a class.

edit: as per ruffin's comment below, if the interface is

export interface ITiered { one: { two: { three: function (x) {...} } } } 

and you try let x = {} as ITiered, then you'll have an error when you call something like x.one.two.three()

6
  • 1
    Isn't that dangerous if the interface isn't single-tiered and nullable like the one in this example? That is, if the interface is export interface ITiered { one: { two: { three: function (x) {...} } } } and you try let x = {} as ITiered, wouldn't x.one.two.three() blow up with no defined two? Guess I should go set up a simplest case... ;^)
    – ruffin
    May 18, 2020 at 17:57
  • 2
    Yeah, that blows up. main.ts:11 ERROR TypeError: Cannot read property 'two' of undefined You've been warned. ;^D
    – ruffin
    May 18, 2020 at 18:07
  • 1
    Good to know, I'll add that disclaimer to my answer. :) May 18, 2020 at 19:41
  • Awesome solution! Why this is not the most up-voted answer? ...
    – RamoFX
    Dec 18, 2021 at 13:17
  • Could you explain what's the syntax means? I think <GenericType> means a generic type. What is JUST a generic type mean?
    – Jimmy Chu
    May 20 at 4:53
21

In Typescript if you want to use Object Initializer you need to define all properties in the class.

let category: Category = {
    name: '',
    description: ''
};

With this way your model still can be remain as an interface.

16
export interface Category {
  name: string;
  description: string;
}


category = {} as Category ;

Edit: Wanted to put the comment below in the answer so people know why my answer is wrong. I was assuming you would always assign right after, but that's not a good assumption to make.

now you have an object in your system that is assumed to be of some type, but with some required properties missing. this is just bad advice causing errors somewhere down the line.

1
  • 1
    now you have an object in your system that is assumed to be of some type, but with some required properties missing. this is just bad advice causing errors somewhere down the line.
    – chpio
    Jan 4, 2021 at 15:31
6

Your object literal must match the interface. Since your interface has two required properties (name and description) they must both be declared when the object is instantiated.

const category: Category = {
    name: 'foo',
    description: 'bar'
};

If you cannot construct the entire object up front you can use the builtin Partial type to build the object.

const builder: Partial<Category> = {};
builder.name = 'foo';
builder.description = 'bar';

const category: Category = builder as Category;
6

Like C# class:

export class Category {
    category: number = null;
    description: string = null;
    name: string = null;

  public constructor(init?: Partial<Category>) {
        Object.assign(this, init);
}
}

Now when you create a new instance all field names are disponible and empty.

 const instance_of_category: Category = new Category();

now you have emty class object with all fields defined like c#:

instance_of_category{
    "category": null,
    "description": null,
    "name": null
}
2

If you already have a class and you want to create new instance and initialize properties at the same time you can try this

return Object.assign(new Person(), {
    name:"Your Name"
});
1
interface Person{
    id: number; 
    name: string;
}

let x: Person = {
    id : 0,
    name :"JOHN"
};

alert(x.name);
0

You can use Record type as well.

{
    category: Record<string, string>;
}
0
let category = <Category>{ };

This is the way when you don't want to change the definition of either interface or class.

In this way will be generic type of object which isn't dependent on the data type and is also reusable.

0

Other ways to initialize an object would be by using pipe (|) to define multiple types which is best if you expect the object to be filled out in the future say by a callback or rest call.

But you may have to handle the cases of nullability here else you will end up with null ref exception.

Here is a sample usage:

export class MyClass{
    myObject : MyObject | null = null;
}

Note : myObject field is expected by compiler to be initialized by values or null

Another way is to use the undefined fields, this way the compiler won't expect an initializer

export class MyClass{
    rates : MyObject | undefined; //compiler doesn't expect it to be initalized
}
-4

You can do :

interface Person{
    id: number; 
    name: string;
}

person : Person = new Person;

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