9

I need to add a default method to an interface some classes implement, but my IDE complains (bean may not have been initialized). Code would be something like this:

public interface IValidator {

    MyValidationBean beanToBeAutowired;
    ...
    default Boolean doSomeNewValidations(){
        return beanToBeAutowired.doSomeNewValidations();
    }
}

Is it just that autowiring into interfaces is not allowed or there's something wrong with the code? Using @Component on the interface doesn't make any difference.

I'd rather keep this design instead of using an abstract class.

2
  • 6
    dependency injection in an interface won't work cause you can't instantiate an interface so you wont be able to inject anything.
    – Amit Naik
    Oct 3, 2018 at 7:10
  • Use the annotation in the implementation class.
    – Sumesh TG
    Oct 3, 2018 at 7:19

3 Answers 3

5

Adding a Variable into interface is not possible in Java. It will be by default a public static final constant. So you have to do either the following:

MyValidationBean beanToBeAutowired = new MyValidationBeanImpl();

or the following:

MyValidationBean beanToBeAutowired();

default Boolean doSomeNewValidations(){
    return beanToBeAutowired().doSomeNewValidations();
}

And you can override the beanToBeAutowired method in the implementation class.

1
  • 2
    Thanks for the advice, but it will be cleaner to switch to an abstract class (in my case). Oct 3, 2018 at 7:14
3

i can think of solution as below -

public interface IValidator {

   public Service getBeanToBeAutowired();

   default Boolean doSomeNewValidations(){
    return getBeanToBeAutowired().doSomeNewValidations();
   }

}

public class ValidatorClass implements IValidator {

    @Autowire private Service service;

    @Override
    public Service getBeanToBeAutowired() {
        return service;
    }

}
2
  • I was thinking the same thing... I'd recommend providing a basic implementation to this answer to demonstrate how this might work
    – shinjw
    Oct 3, 2018 at 7:13
  • Same as with shazin's answer, would work but it's be easier in my case to switch to an abstract class. Thanks for the input Oct 3, 2018 at 7:17
2

Just an idea, send validation bean to interface as parameter;

public interface IValidator {

    default Boolean doSomeNewValidations(MyValidationBean beanToBeAutowired){
        return beanToBeAutowired.doSomeNewValidations();
    }
}

Your callerClass;

public class CallerClass implements IValidator{

    @Autowired
    MyValidationBean beanToBeAutowired;
    ...

    doSomeNewValidations(beanToBeAutowired);

}

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