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I am working since more than a year with React and i have read Thinking in react, Lifting state up, and State and lifecycle.

I have learned that React's concept with data flow is is One-way data flow.

Citates from these pages:

React’s one-way data flow (also called one-way binding) keeps everything modular and fast.

Remember: React is all about one-way data flow down the component hierarchy. It may not be immediately clear which component should own what state. This is often the most challenging part for newcomers to understand, so follow these steps to figure it out:...

If you imagine a component tree as a waterfall of props, each component’s state is like an additional water source that joins it at an arbitrary point but also flows down.

As i understand this, following example is not allowed because i am passing child state data to the parent. But i see some developers working like that:

class Parent extends React.Component {
    constructor(props) {
        super(props);
        this.state = { fromParent: null };
    }

    addSomething(stateValueFromChild) {
        this.setState({fromParent: stateValueFromChild});
    }

    render() {
        return <Child
                addSomething={(stateValueFromChild) => this.addSomething(stateValueFromChild)}>
                 // ...
        </Child>;
    }
}

class Child extends React.Component {
    constructor(props) {
        super(props);
        this.state = { fromChild: 'foo' };
    }

    render() {
        return <Form onSubmit={() => this.props.addSomething(this.state.fromChild)}>
                 // ...
        </Form>;
    }
}

My questions now are:

  • Is this really not allowed?
  • Why should this not be modular and fast?
  • Is this really braking the one-way-dataflow, becoming a two way dataflow?
  • What other problems could happen with this way?
  • When i would lift the state up, how would you solve following case; 50 concrete parents that uses that child component, should every parent have a same initialized sub-state for the same child that they are using?
2
  • 1
    This looks fine to me - one-way data flow doesn't mean no child-to-parent communication, it just means you shouldn't have the same piece of state being stored/modified in multiple places. In your example, the data stored in the parent and child state aren't quite the same - your child component stores the form's current state (whether the user has submitted or not), and the parent stores the concrete data that the user has submitted.
    – Joe Clay
    Oct 3, 2018 at 14:41
  • 3
    In your scenario with the 50 parents, I'd say it depends whether the 50 parents need to know about each other - if not, you could maybe get away with storing the data in the parents directly, but if they all need to be aware of all of the submitted data, you'd be better off just passing it up another layer (again via callback props) to the common parent.
    – Joe Clay
    Oct 3, 2018 at 14:48

3 Answers 3

3

Is this really not allowed? Why should this not be modular and fast?

Excellent questions. This is allowed. It's just a bit tricky to make it work right because you've got state synchronization here. In the modern frontend world, the state synchronization is believed to be a very challenging task.

The problem will appear when you'll need to sync the state in two directions. For instance, if this child form is used to edit some element of the list, and you're changing the current element of the list. You'll need the child component to detect that situation and sync its local state with the new element from props during the particular UI update. As long as you don't have that, you're fine.

Is this really braking the one-way-dataflow, becoming a two way dataflow?

Nah, it's not. It's still unidirectional data flow because React can't work in any other way by design; UI updates always coming from top to bottom. In your example, your child triggers an event which causes the parent to update its state (it's totally fine), which will cause the UI update of the parent and the child. If you really violate "unidirectional data flow", you'll feel it. You will get an infinite loop or something similar.

When i would lift the state up, how would you solve following case; 50 concrete parents that uses that child component, should every parent have a same initialized sub-state for the same child that they are using?

Yep, that's what they mean by "lifting the state". You organize your root state as a tree reflecting the state of the children, then pass down elements of the state to children along with callbacks to modify the root state.

2
  • Okay so my example seems to be a one-way-state-value-synchronization from child to parent, and that should be allowed. But when i would pass a parent state value to the child as prop, set that prop in the child's state, then passing this child's state value back to its parent with a callback, setting it to the parent's state, that would be a problem because that would be state-synching-in-two-directions. Correct?
    – fabpico
    Oct 5, 2018 at 6:19
  • 1
    I don't think it would be a problem, because to propagate values from child to parent you always have to trigger an event and propagation from parent to child goes automatically by react's design. So you can not end up with infinite loop
    – ramusus
    Oct 5, 2018 at 14:31
1

It's allowed and there is nothing wrong with your code, but I would not call it passing state from child to parent. All you do is invoking method passed in props and triggered by event with some argument, which in your example is child's state value, but it could be any other variable. Parent component knows nothing about nature of this argument, it just receives the value and able to do anything with it, for example change it's own state to another. If Child's state will change, Parent is not going to receive this update without onSubmit event fired again. But children always receive updates from the parent and automatically get rerendered, when props get changed. And of course some of the props could be states of some parents. Here is the major difference in behavior.

There is a good article explaining this in details: Props down, Events Up

1
  • Thanks alot, but to the article Props down, Events Up, this is an example of many that shows up how to pass (click) event data to parent, not state data to parent. For me as i initially understood the docs, state data from child to parent should not be passed like event data. So i am not really sure that if we are missing something, although your own state argumentation sounds valid.
    – fabpico
    Oct 4, 2018 at 6:46
0

Your question is absolutely correct, many times developer (including myself) struggled for passing child's components state or props to parent component.

I always do logic for getting next state or next props in child component and pass next state or next props to parent component by using handler functions of parent component.

import React, { Component } from "react";
import { render } from "react-dom";

class Parent extends Component {
  constructor(props) {
    super(props);
    this.handleSomething = this.handleSomething.bind(this); // binding method
    this.state = {
      fromParent: "foo"
    };
  }

  handleSomething(value) {
    this.setState(prevState => {
      return {
        fromParent: value
      };
    });
  }

  render() {
    return (
      <div>
        <h1>State: {this.state.fromParent}</h1>
        <Child handleSomething={this.handleSomething} />
      </div>
    );
  }
}

class Child extends Component {
  constructor(props) {
    super(props);
    this.state = {
      fromChild: "bar"
    };
  }

  render() {
    return (
      <div>
        <button
          onClick={e => {
            const { fromChild } = this.state;
            // do whatever as per your logic for get value from child pass to handleSomething function
            // you can also do same for handling forms
            this.props.handleSomething(fromChild);
          }}
        >
          Click Me
        </button>
      </div>
    );
  }
}

render(<Parent />, document.getElementById("app"));
2
  • What is your opinion/experience, why you are using nextStete/nextProps and why is this better than the example in the question? You are still passing child state data to the parent.
    – fabpico
    Oct 4, 2018 at 7:00
  • Best practice is to always use a single source of truth for data, it means that the only way to change your data in UI. I have more than 2 years of experience in React. That's why I'm showing you this my approach for handling state.
    – Sagar
    Oct 4, 2018 at 8:16

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