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Identity Interface was implemented in the system years ago. At this point, we got the necessity that each Identity should be Comparable. One of the options is to add additional & Comparable type to Identity declaration:

interface Identity<K> {

}

class Handler<T extends Identity<?> & Comparable<T>> {

  Handler(T value) {
    Util.<T>handle(value);
  }
}

class Handler2<T extends Identity<?> & Comparable<T>> {

  Handler2(T value) {
    Util.<T>handle(value);
  }
}

interface Util {

  static <T extends Comparable<T>> void handle(T value) {
  }
}

One of the main disadvantages is that a huge amount of code should be enhanced with identical information (e.g. & Comparable). Much elegant solution would be to extend Comparable interface with Identity one:

interface Identity<K> extends Comparable<Identity<K>>{

}

But in this case Handler class will highlight a compilation error:

error: method handle in interface Util cannot be applied to given types; required: T#1 found: T#2 reason: explicit type argument T#2 does not conform to declared bound(s) Comparable where T#1,T#2 are type-variables: T#1 extends Comparable declared in method handle(T#1) T#2 extends Identity declared in class Handler

What are the possible solutions in this situation?

1

After changing Identity to what you suggested

interface Identity<K> extends Comparable<Identity<K>>{

}

You have two options. Either:

class Handler<T, U extends Identity<T>>
{
    Handler(U value) {
        Util.handle(value);
    }
}

Sample usage:

Handler<String, Identity<String>> stringHandler = new Handler<>(new FooIdentity());

or

class Handler<T>
{
    Handler(Identity<T> value)
    {
        Util.handle(value);
    }
}

Sample usage:

final Handler<String> stringHandler = new Handler<>(new FooIdentity());

And Util can remain unchanged.

  • in this case you have a Type recursion. As you would have ConcreteType extends Identity<ConcreteType> to be used for Handler. – edward_wong Oct 3 '18 at 16:16
  • @kvatashydze Right. Fixed it – Michael Oct 3 '18 at 16:24
  • yes this seems to be a solution, but the concern is that we are forced to use the Type inside of Handler, and not the Identity interface. So basically, all handlers should be written for concrete types. – edward_wong Oct 3 '18 at 16:47
  • @kvatashydze I don't understand. Can you give an example? – Michael Oct 3 '18 at 16:54

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