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In the following code, how would I get the function the base class function clocks::increment() to increment the derived class object thing2.hrs without modifying main()? If I add temporary cout statements in increment(), the call "thing2.increment()" seems to be incrementing a base class object's member or a random memory spot if I haven't created a base object. Without modifying the call in main() to pass a variable (and modifying the function), is the only solution to override the function with a new definition in the derived class?

   class clocks
{
public:
    clocks();
    void increment();

private:
    int hrs;
};
clocks::clocks()
{
    hrs = 1;
}
void clocks::increment()
{
    hrs++;
}



class childClock : public clocks
{
public:
    childClock();
    int hrs;
};
childClock::childClock()
{
    hrs = 2;
}


int main()
{
    clocks thing;
    childClock thing2;

    cout << thing2.hrs<<" ";
    thing2.increment();
    cout << thing2.hrs;

    return 0;
}
  • What do you mean by 'have't created base object'? – SergeyA Oct 3 '18 at 18:56
  • You're shadowing the hrs member in the derived class. Did you mean to make it protected instead? To access the base member, you could use thing2.clocks::hrs if it wasn't private. – Bartek Banachewicz Oct 3 '18 at 18:57
  • childClock has two hrs members. Is that the intent? – alter igel Oct 3 '18 at 18:59
  • The answer below cleared up my misunderstanding, but SergeyA - I meant that if I ran the program with the first line in main (clocks thing) commented out that the program still ran, but even weirder. Bartek - This was a small part of an assignment and the class was defined for me as well as main(), and I was not to modify them. Alter and Rivasa(below in the answer) cleared up my misunderstanding. Thanks all. – user8212489 Oct 3 '18 at 20:39
0

Few things.

  1. You don't need a second hrs in the child class, as the base class has already declared this member.
  2. hrs should be protected, so the child class can access/set it, and you can use a getter to access the value instead.

Following these notes, we can edit your code a bit as follows:

#include <iostream>

class clocks{
public:
    clocks();
    void increment();
    int getHrs();
protected:
    int hrs;
};

clocks::clocks(){
    hrs = 1;
}

int clocks::getHrs(){
  return hrs;
}

void clocks::increment(){
    hrs++;
}

class childClock : public clocks{
  public:
  childClock();
};

childClock::childClock(){
  hrs = 2;
}

int main(){
    clocks thing;
    childClock thing2;
    std::cout << thing2.getHrs() <<" ";
    thing2.increment();
    std::cout << thing2.getHrs();
    return 0;
}
  • Ahh, much thanks for clearing up my misunderstanding - I mistakenly thought that if the base class declaration was private that the member wouldn't exist in derived classes at all. – user8212489 Oct 3 '18 at 20:36

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