37

I am getting ESlint error for the following line this.state.items.map(item => (

The error is Must use destructuring state assignment

{
            this.state.items.map(item => (
              <div key={item}>
                {
                item.links.map(thing => (
                  <NavLink
                    key={thing.link.id}
                    exact
                    to={thing.link.url}
                  >
                    {thing.link.text}
                  </NavLink>
                ))
                }
              </div>
            ))
          }

I am using "eslint-config-airbnb"

Also, this is my componentDidMount function if this is related

componentDidMount() {
  fetch('./data/data_arr.js')
  .then(results => results.json())
  .then(results => this.setState({ items: results }));
}

Any help to try and understand this would be great. thank you

3
  • 2
    You don't need to ask a question about linter warnings each time you get one :) Just use your linter warning line. There will be some hints, URLs that directing you to the right place like @Nguyễn Thanh Tú did their provided answer. Or, at least Google it :)
    – devserkan
    Oct 4, 2018 at 3:20
  • 2
    Details of this lint rule GitHub - Enforce consistent usage of destructuring assignment of props, state, and context
    – RBT
    May 2, 2019 at 6:49
  • 1
    @devserkan Greetings from Google!
    – Software2
    Feb 10, 2021 at 3:06

1 Answer 1

40

That's called:

Enforce consistent usage of destructuring assignment of props, state, and context (react/destructuring-assignment)

More details are available here: destructuring-assignment

In order to make that warning/error disappear, you could do like this:

      ...
      const { items }= this.state;
      ...
      {
        items.map(item => (
          <div key={item}>
            {
            item.links.map(thing => (
              <NavLink
                key={thing.link.id}
                exact
                to={thing.link.url}
              >
                {thing.link.text}
              </NavLink>
            ))
            }
          </div>
        ))
      }
5
  • 20
    My confusion is... why is this a rule? It seems like the documentation should make a case for itself, maybe recognize trade-offs.
    – M. Herold
    Jan 17, 2019 at 19:13
  • 7
    I also wonder why it is so in most practices? Because in good coding practice, where I read from the book Clean Code by Robert Cecil Martin it is better to keep as near as possible the source of the variable (from where it comes) to avoid unnecessary scrolls up and down. Can anyone inform me please, if there is a serious issue about this?
    – Abdulbosid
    Jul 9, 2019 at 5:36
  • 4
    It's simply to avoid redundant this.props / this.state in the code, and to improve readability. It is not very relevant with this exemple, but it is so much cleaner in real world. Dec 3, 2019 at 12:53
  • yeah if I'm looking at a component for the first time, I kind of like to obviously see if things are bound from state or props right in the markup
    – jumpdart
    Dec 17, 2019 at 16:38
  • Its almost a pointless rule, is the only reason to stop you setting state directly accidentally?
    – MaxPower
    Feb 17, 2020 at 9:33

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