52

How do I test async code with mocha? I wanna use multiple await inside mocha

var assert = require('assert');

async function callAsync1() {
  // async stuff
}

async function callAsync2() {
  return true;
}

describe('test', function () {
  it('should resolve', async (done) => {
      await callAsync1();
      let res = await callAsync2();
      assert.equal(res, true);
      done();
      });
});

This produces error below:

  1) test
       should resolve:
     Error: Resolution method is overspecified. Specify a callback *or* return a Promise; not both.
      at Context.it (test.js:8:4)

If I remove done() I get:

  1) test
       should resolve:
     Error: Timeout of 2000ms exceeded. For async tests and hooks, ensure "done()" is called; if returning a Promise, ensure it resolves. (/tmp/test/test.js)

1 Answer 1

91

Mocha supports Promises out-of-the-box; You just have to return the Promise to it()'s callback.

If the Promise resolves then the test passes. In contrast, if the Promise rejects then the test fails. As simple as that.

Now, since async functions always implicitly return a Promise you can just do:

async function getFoo() {
  return 'foo'
}

describe('#getFoo', () => {
  it('resolves with foo', () => {
    return getFoo().then(result => {
      assert.equal(result, 'foo')
    })
  })
})

You don't need done nor async for your it.

However, if you still insist on using async/await:

async function getFoo() {
  return 'foo'
}

describe('#getFoo', () => {
  it('returns foo', async () => {
    const result = await getFoo()
    assert.equal(result, 'foo')
  })
})

In either case, DO NOT declare done as a function argument.

If you use any of the methods described above you need to remove done completely from your code. Passing done as an argument to it() callbacks hints to Mocha that you intent to eventually call it.

Mocha has 3 different ways of ending a test. They aren't meant to be used together.
You pick one of the following:

  • Return the Promise to it and use the then/catch handlers.
  • Use async/await
  • Use done. This is a relic from the old days when we had to deal with callbacks. It still has some use cases, mainly testing callback-style code or events.

Using both Promises and done will result in:

Error: Resolution method is overspecified. Specify a callback or return a Promise; not both

Technically speaking, Promises and async/await are one and the same; async/await is syntactic sugar built on top of Promises and Generators. async functions return Promises after all and you are always awaiting Promises.
So it's not really 3 different methods but just 2: callback-style and promise-based. But I digress, just pick a method and go with it all the way.

The done method is only used for testing callback-based or event-based code. You shouldn't use it if you're testing Promise-based or async/await functions. If you find yourself having to use both done and Promise.then/Promise.catch semantics, you've probably misunderstood how Promises work and failing tests would be the least of your worries.

5
  • I want to call multiple async code. That's why I put async under function. Furthermore I want to make assertion after calling it, so I can't return a promise. I edited my question accordingly Oct 4, 2018 at 7:48
  • 1
    Got it; Edited. Either way when I say you don't need done, it means you shouldn't even pass it in the it callback. Remove done completely from your code. Passing done as an argument hints to Mocha that you intent to eventually call it. Oct 4, 2018 at 7:55
  • 1
    I'm doing same as async function getFoo() { return 'foo' } describe('#getFoo', () => { it('returns foo', async () => { const result = await getFoo() assert.equal(result, 'foo') }) }) but it gives me this error. Error: Timeout of 2000ms exceeded. For async tests and hooks, ensure "done()" is called; if returning a Promise, ensure it resolves. Do I still not need done()? What is the workaround?
    – Gowthamss
    Aug 12, 2022 at 10:23
  • I don't understand why it fails for async-await, but it worked using promises.
    – Gowthamss
    Aug 12, 2022 at 10:32
  • @Gowthamss and that's the only test in your test file? It looks OK to me. Can you write up a test JS Fiddle I could copy/paste and run? Aug 13, 2022 at 5:11

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