In my public method #recalculate, calling the private method1. This method throw exception 'ActiveRecord::StaleObjectError'.

def recalculate
  method_1
  self.save!
end

private
def method_1
    begin
      ####
      ####
      if self.lock_version == Product.find(self.id).lock_version
         Product.where(:id => self.id).update_all(attributes)
      else
         raise ActiveRecord::StaleObjectError.new(self, "test")
      end
    rescue ActiveRecord::StaleObjectError => e
        if tries < 3
           tries += 1
           sleep(1 + tries)
           self.reload
           retry
        else
           raise Exception.new(timeout.inspect)
        end
    end
end

Rspec Test case:

  it 'if car is updated then ActiveRecord::StaleObjectError should be raised' do
    prod_v1 =Product.find(@prod.id)
    prod_v2 = Car.find(@prod.id)
    prod_v1.recalculate
    prod_v1.reload  # will make lock_version of prod_v1 to 1

    prod_v2.recalculate # howvever lock_version of prod_v2 is still 0.

    expect{ prod_v2.send(:method1)}.to raise_error(ActiveRecord::StaleObjectError)

Error:

Failure/Error: expect(prod_v2.send(:method1)).to raise_error(ActiveRecord::StaleObjectError) expected ActiveRecord::StaleObjectError but nothing was raised

Please suggest how to write the unit test case for an exception which is raised in private method. I have used send based on the link:

Note: Exception was raised for in the first time because self.lock_version == Product.find(self.id) was false . And in retry self.lock_version == Product.find(self.id) is true so exception is not capture.

  • For raise expectations, use block form of expect: expect { something }.to raise SomeError – Sergio Tulentsev Oct 4 at 8:24
  • 2
    try to comment the expect line in the test and run it; if you don't see any exception the exception is not raised – mdesantis Oct 4 at 9:10
  • 1
    but aren't you rescuing from that exception? If you rescue from it the exception can not be caught by rspec, nor seen by you when running the spec. – trueunlessfalse Oct 4 at 9:13
  • 1
    @mdesantis You are correct. But an exception is raised only one time, the second time it was handled. Can you suggest how to write the test case for this, when an exception was raised for the first time? – geeks Oct 4 at 9:24
  • 1
    @geeks I think your best bet is to split this method, and tests part individually. Move the part before the rescue in to a separate method and test under what circumstances it raises the 'StaleObject' error. When testing method_1 you can stub a way that separate method to raise and exception, and that way test your rescue block is doing what it should... – trueunlessfalse Oct 4 at 9:27

Here's a simpler version of what your code is actually doing:

class StaleObjectError < Exception
end

class MyClass
  def initialize
    @tries = 0
  end

  def method_1
    begin
      raise StaleObjectError.new("I'm the more specific exception")
    rescue StaleObjectError => e
      if @tries < 3
        @tries += 1
        sleep(1 + @tries)
        retry
      else
        raise Exception.new("I'm the failure case")
      end
    end
  end

end

myObject = MyClass.new

begin
  myObject.method_1
rescue Exception => e
  # in the error condition, this is always #<Exception: I'm the failure case>
  puts e.inspect
end

Which results in

#<Exception: I'm the failure case>

You won't be able to expect the ActiveRecord::StaleObjectError because you mask it with your rescue else- you've converted the StaleObjectError into an Exception

If you want to preserve the StaleObjectError then you can raise e in your rescue else instead. So to use my example code again:

if @tries < 3
  @tries += 1
  sleep(1 + @tries)
  retry
else
  raise e
end

Which would result in

#<StaleObjectError: I'm the more specific exception>

Then your rspec example should be able to expect the code to raise the correct exception type.

  • Thanks you for the answer, you mean to say that I will never able to write test case specific to StaleObjectError – geeks Oct 4 at 11:33
  • @geeks can you be more specific about what and why you want to test, that is not yet covered by this answer or any of our comments above? Or maybe you could try to implement some of the suggestions people gave you, and then update your question, including your changed code as well as the test case. – trueunlessfalse Oct 4 at 11:44
  • I'd say that with your current code structure, no you won't be able to test for that specific exception because you are masking it in your code. The rescue effectively hides it from any outside observer and then a different exception is raised. You can infer what happened from the second exception as that's all the outside caller will receive. – Peter Mellett Oct 5 at 14:48

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