It's probably beginner question but I'm going through documentation for longer time already and I can't find any solution. I thought I could use implode for each dimension and then put those strings back together with str_split to make new simple array. However I never know if the join pattern isn't also in values and so after doing str_split my original values could break.

Is there something like combine($array1, $array2) for arrays inside of multi-dimensional array?

19 Answers 19

up vote 41 down vote accepted

Use array_walk_recursive

<?php

$aNonFlat = array(
    1,
    2,
    array(
        3,
        4,
        5,
        array(
            6,
            7
        ),
        8,
        9,
    ),
    10,
    11
);

$objTmp = (object) array('aFlat' => array());

array_walk_recursive($aNonFlat, create_function('&$v, $k, &$t', '$t->aFlat[] = $v;'), $objTmp);

var_dump($objTmp->aFlat);

/*
array(11) {
  [0]=>
  int(1)
  [1]=>
  int(2)
  [2]=>
  int(3)
  [3]=>
  int(4)
  [4]=>
  int(5)
  [5]=>
  int(6)
  [6]=>
  int(7)
  [7]=>
  int(8)
  [8]=>
  int(9)
  [9]=>
  int(10)
  [10]=>
  int(11)
}
*/

?>

Tested with PHP 5.5.9-1ubuntu4.24 (cli) (built: Mar 16 2018 12:32:06)

  • Does anyone know why this doesn't work unless I use the (depreciated) call-time pass by reference. i.e. array_walk_recursive($array, create_function('&$v, $k, &$t', '$t[] = $v;'), &$flattened); The function definition is correctly defined as pass by reference. but doesn't work unless I pass by reference during call-time. – jskulski Apr 28 '10 at 20:21
  • 2
    @jskilski Objects ($objTmp in this example) are passed by reference automatically; arrays are not. Try using an anonymous function (php.net/manual/en/functions.anonymous.php) instead of create_function. – dave1010 Aug 31 '11 at 11:57
  • 1
    this doesnt work in php 5.3.3 due to a bug in array_walk_recursive - bugs.php.net/bug.php?id=52719 – crazyphoton Jul 23 '12 at 5:09
  • 1
    @crazyphoton The kink says also This bug has been fixed in SVN. – Luc M Jul 23 '12 at 5:53
  • 10
    Why does this answer mention using array_values()? I can't see any use of that function involved in the answer at all. – thomasrutter Sep 14 '16 at 5:21
$array  = your array

$result = call_user_func_array('array_merge', $array);

echo "<pre>";
print_r($result);

REF: http://php.net/manual/en/function.call-user-func-array.php

Here is another solution (works with multi-dimensional array) :

function array_flatten($array) {

   $return = array();
   foreach ($array as $key => $value) {
       if (is_array($value)){ $return = array_merge($return, array_flatten($value));}
       else {$return[$key] = $value;}
   }
   return $return;

}

$array  = Your array

$result = array_flatten($array);

echo "<pre>";
print_r($result);

This is a one line, SUPER easy to use:

$result = array();
array_walk_recursive($original_array,function($v) use (&$result){ $result[] = $v; });

It is very easy to understand, inside the anonymous function/closure. $v is the value of your $original_array.

  • 1
    This is the only one that worked for me in a two level array. – Ciprian Tepes Jan 17 '17 at 15:54
// $array = your multidimensional array

$flat_array = array();

foreach(new RecursiveIteratorIterator(new RecursiveArrayIterator($array)) as $k=>$v){

$flat_array[$k] = $v;

}

Also documented: http://www.phpro.org/examples/Flatten-Array.html

  • 2
    Note: Only use for arrays of primitives. "RecursiveArrayIterator treats all objects as having children, and tries to recurse into them." php.net/manual/en/class.recursivearrayiterator.php#106519 – ReactiveRaven Jan 31 '12 at 9:49
  • 2
    There is also iterator_to_array – hakre Jun 21 '12 at 10:52
  • @hakre: +1 agreed: adding iterator_to_array() to this answer would negate the need for the foreach loop. It could be a simple one-liner function. (albeit a somewhat long one-line) – SDC Jul 19 '12 at 12:14
  • 2
    I know this is old but still useful, however the $k needs to be replaced by something unique, such as a counter. Just using $k causes elements to be removed if the names are the same in inner arrays as the main one. – Austin Best Oct 8 '14 at 20:19
function flatten_array($array, $preserve_keys = 0, &$out = array()) {
    # Flatten a multidimensional array to one dimension, optionally preserving keys.
    #
    # $array - the array to flatten
    # $preserve_keys - 0 (default) to not preserve keys, 1 to preserve string keys only, 2 to preserve all keys
    # $out - internal use argument for recursion
    foreach($array as $key => $child)
        if(is_array($child))
            $out = flatten_array($child, $preserve_keys, $out);
        elseif($preserve_keys + is_string($key) > 1)
            $out[$key] = $child;
        else
            $out[] = $child;
    return $out;
}
  • Sorry but it doesn't seem to handle multidimensional arrays properly - Demo – Álvaro González Sep 15 '15 at 11:27

Another method from PHP's user comments (simplified) and here:

function array_flatten_recursive($array) { 
   if (!$array) return false;
   $flat = array();
   $RII = new RecursiveIteratorIterator(new RecursiveArrayIterator($array));
   foreach ($RII as $value) $flat[] = $value;
   return $flat;
}

The big benefit of this method is that it tracks the depth of the recursion, should you need that while flattening.
This will output:

$array = array( 
    'A' => array('B' => array( 1, 2, 3)), 
    'C' => array(4, 5) 
); 
print_r(array_flatten_recursive($array)); 

#Returns: 
Array ( 
    [0] => 1 
    [1] => 2 
    [2] => 3 
    [3] => 4 
    [4] => 5 
)

A non-recursive solution (but order-destroying):

function flatten($ar) {
    $toflat = array($ar);
    $res = array();

    while (($r = array_shift($toflat)) !== NULL) {
        foreach ($r as $v) {
            if (is_array($v)) {
                $toflat[] = $v;
            } else {
                $res[] = $v;
            }
        }
    }

    return $res;
}

In PHP>=5.3 and based on Luc M's answer (the first one) you can make use of closures like this

array_walk_recursive($aNonFlat, function(&$v, $k, &$t){$t->aFlat[] = $v;}, $objTmp);

I love this because I don't have to surround the function's code with quotes like when using create_function()

  • 1
    if you're using anonymous functions, you might as well use a captured closure variable directly rather than this objTemp stuff – user102008 Jun 9 '12 at 8:02
  • 1
    There is a bug in PHP5.3.3 which causes this to crash - bugs.php.net/bug.php?id=52719 – crazyphoton Jul 23 '12 at 5:08

With PHP 7, you can use generators and generator delegation (yield from) to flatten an array:

function array_flatten_iterator (array $array) {
    foreach ($array as $value) {
        if (is_array($value)) {
            yield from array_flatten_iterator($value);
        } else {
            yield $value;
        }
    }
}

function array_flatten (array $array) {
    return iterator_to_array(array_flatten_iterator($array), false);
}

Example:

$array = [
    1,
    2,
    [
        3,
        4,
        5,
        [
            6,
            7
        ],
        8,
        9,
    ],
    10,
    11,
];    

var_dump(array_flatten($array));

http://3v4l.org/RU30W

Using higher-order functions (note: I'm using inline anonymous functions, which appeared in PHP 5.3):

function array_flatten($array) {
    return array_reduce(
        $array,
        function($prev, $element) {
            if (!is_array($element))
                $prev[] = $element;
            else
                $prev = array_merge($prev, array_flatten($element));
            return $prev;
        },
        array()
    );
}

A new approach based on the previous example function submited by chaos, which fixes the bug of overwritting string keys in multiarrays:

# Flatten a multidimensional array to one dimension, optionally preserving keys.
# $array - the array to flatten
# $preserve_keys - 0 (default) to not preserve keys, 1 to preserve string keys only, 2 to preserve all keys
# $out - internal use argument for recursion

function flatten_array($array, $preserve_keys = 2, &$out = array(), &$last_subarray_found) 
{
        foreach($array as $key => $child)
        {
            if(is_array($child))
            {
                $last_subarray_found = $key;
                $out = flatten_array($child, $preserve_keys, $out, $last_subarray_found);
            }
            elseif($preserve_keys + is_string($key) > 1)
            {
                if ($last_subarray_found)
                {
                    $sfinal_key_value = $last_subarray_found . "_" . $key;
                }
                else
                {
                    $sfinal_key_value = $key;
                }
                $out[$sfinal_key_value] = $child;
            }
            else
            {
                $out[] = $child;
            }
        }

        return $out;
}

Example:
$newarraytest = array();
$last_subarray_found = "";
$this->flatten_array($array, 2, $newarraytest, $last_subarray_found);
/*consider $mArray as multidimensional array and $sArray as single dimensional array
this code will ignore the parent array
*/

function flatten_array2($mArray) {
    $sArray = array();

    foreach ($mArray as $row) {
        if ( !(is_array($row)) ) {
            if($sArray[] = $row){
            }
        } else {
            $sArray = array_merge($sArray,flatten_array2($row));
        }
    }
    return $sArray;
}

you can try this:

function flat_an_array($a)
{
    foreach($a as $i)
    {
        if(is_array($i)) 
        {
            if($na) $na = array_merge($na,flat_an_array($i));
            else $na = flat_an_array($i);
        }
        else $na[] = $i;
    }
    return $na;
}

If you're okay with loosing array keys, you may flatten a multi-dimensional array using a recursive closure as a callback that utilizes array_values(), making sure that this callback is a parameter for array_walk(), as follows.

<?php  

$array = [1,2,3,[5,6,7]];
$nu_array = null;
$callback = function ( $item ) use(&$callback, &$nu_array) {
    if (!is_array($item)) {
    $nu_array[] = $item;
    }
    else
    if ( is_array( $item ) ) {
     foreach( array_values($item) as $v) {
         if ( !(is_array($v))) {
             $nu_array[] = $v;
         }
         else
         { 
             $callback( $v );
         continue;
         }    
     }
    }
};

array_walk($array, $callback);
print_r($nu_array);

The one drawback of the preceding example is that it involves writing far more code than the following solution which uses array_walk_recursive() along with a simplified callback:

<?php  

$array = [1,2,3,[5,6,7]];

$nu_array = [];
array_walk_recursive($array, function ( $item ) use(&$nu_array )
                     {
                         $nu_array[] = $item;
                     }
);
print_r($nu_array);

See live code

This example seems preferable to the previous one, hiding the details about how values are extracted from a multidimensional array. Surely, iteration occurs, but whether it entails recursion or control structure(s), you'll only know from perusing array.c. Since functional programming focuses on input and output rather than the minutiae of obtaining a result, surely one can remain unconcerned about how behind-the-scenes iteration occurs, that is until a perspective employer poses such a question.

You can use the flatten function from Non-standard PHP library (NSPL). It works with arrays and any iterable data structures.

assert([1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9] === flatten([[1, [2, [3]]], [[[4, 5, 6]]], 7, 8, [9]]));

Simple approach..See it via recursion..

<?php

function flatten_array($simple){
static $outputs=array();
foreach ( $simple as $value)
{
if(is_array($value)){
    flatten_array($value);
}
else{
    $outputs[]=$value;
}

}
return $outputs;
}

$eg=['s'=>['p','n'=>['t']]];
$out=flatten_array($eg);
print_r($out);

?>
  • Why is using static a potentially bad idea for this task? Unintended data retention. This will certainly catch programmers by surprise if they don't know/expect this behavior. Look at this demonstration. – mickmackusa Jul 16 at 0:52
  • You have posted a "code-only" answer -- these are low value on StackOverflow because they fail to educate the OP and future researchers. Please take a moment to improve this answer by including how your answer works and why you feel it is a better idea versus the earlier answers. – mickmackusa Jul 16 at 0:54

If you're interested in just the values for one particular key, you might find this approach useful:

function valuelist($array, $array_column) {
    $return = array();
    foreach($array AS $row){
        $return[]=$row[$array_column];
    };
    return $return;
};

Example:

Given $get_role_action=

array(3) {
  [0]=>
  array(2) {
    ["ACTION_CD"]=>
    string(12) "ADD_DOCUMENT"
    ["ACTION_REASON"]=>
    NULL
  }
  [1]=>
  array(2) {
    ["ACTION_CD"]=>
    string(13) "LINK_DOCUMENT"
    ["ACTION_REASON"]=>
    NULL
  }
  [2]=>
  array(2) {
    ["ACTION_CD"]=>
    string(15) "UNLINK_DOCUMENT"
    ["ACTION_REASON"]=>
    NULL
  }
}

than $variables['role_action_list']=valuelist($get_role_action, 'ACTION_CD'); would result in:

$variables["role_action_list"]=>
  array(3) {
    [0]=>
    string(12) "ADD_DOCUMENT"
    [1]=>
    string(13) "LINK_DOCUMENT"
    [2]=>
    string(15) "UNLINK_DOCUMENT"
  }

From there you can perform value look-ups like so:

if( in_array('ADD_DOCUMENT', $variables['role_action_list']) ){
    //do something
};
  • This is a PHP knock-off of a CFML function by the same name. – Jeromy French Jul 23 '14 at 20:45
  • I have downvoted because it is the right answer to the wrong question. – mickmackusa Jul 16 at 1:01

any of this didnt work for me ... so had to run it myself. works just fine:

function arrayFlat($arr){
$out = '';
    foreach($arr as $key => $value){

        if(!is_array($value)){
            $out .= $value.',';
        }else{
            $out .= $key.',';
            $out .= arrayFlat($value);
        }

    }
    return trim($out,',');
}


$result = explode(',',arrayFlat($yourArray));
echo '<pre>';
print_r($result);
echo '</pre>';
  • This code-only answer doesn't work as desired. 3v4l.org/U3bfp <-- proof This is the reason for my downvote. – mickmackusa Jul 16 at 1:03

Given multi-dimensional array and converting it into one-dimensional, can be done by unsetting all values which are having arrays and saving them into first dimension, for example:

function _flatten_array($arr) {
  while ($arr) {
    list($key, $value) = each($arr); 
    is_array($value) ? $arr = $value : $out[$key] = $value;
    unset($arr[$key]);
  }
  return (array)$out;
}
  • I have downvoted this answer because it doesn't work on any version. 3v4l.org/7cO9N (Proof) Also, each() is deprecated from php7.2. – mickmackusa Jul 16 at 0:59

Your Answer

 

By clicking "Post Your Answer", you acknowledge that you have read our updated terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy, and that your continued use of the website is subject to these policies.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.