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I would like to build graph with some random values in it. Then I would like to evaluate the graph with different seeds. Here is an example what I'm trying to achieve:

import tensorflow as tf
seed = tf.placeholder(dtype=tf.int32, shape=(), name="seed")
randoms = tf.random_normal(shape=[8], seed=seed)

Then I was hoping to do something like this where first two calls would return same result:

sess = tf.InteractiveSession()
sess.run(randoms, {seed: 1})
sess.run(randoms, {seed: 1})
sess.run(randoms, {seed: 2})

Is there any way to work around this problem?

  • Random operations have an internal random number generator that is initialized when the session is created. TensorFlow need to know the specific seed values by then so, these must be primitive Python numbers, they cannot be tensors to be evaluated later. As far as I know, there is (currently) no way to reinitialize the random number generator in a random op within the same session. If you really need this ability you could implement your own random operations in C++, although that is a nontrivial amount of work (see this post). – jdehesa Oct 5 '18 at 10:21
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    How come I'm only one who needs this. There are many applications where in serving time the result needs to be somehow random (exploration) but this randomness needs to be controlled (e.g by customer). It feels amazingly stupid to generate random numbers outside tensorflow and then feed them into the model. But currently that seems to be the only way? Unless I do the non-trivial work with C++ you mentioned :(( – Pekka Oct 5 '18 at 10:27
  • Well, you can use multiple seeds, but you need different graphs, not just different sessions actually. Random ops use two seeds that get fixed on op creation, even if you call tf.set_random_seed later previous ops will not change the seed. For example, for the output of tf.random_normal, check random.op.inputs[0].op.inputs[0].op.get_attr('seed') and random.op.inputs[0].op.inputs[0].op.get_attr('seed2') (graph seed and op seed, 0 by default, which means random seed, see tf.set_random_seed). These cannot be changed. – jdehesa Oct 5 '18 at 10:39
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    The tf.contrib.stateless module exists for exactly this purpose: https://www.tensorflow.org/api_docs/python/tf/contrib/stateless – Jacob Buckman Jan 17 at 0:29
3

This can be done with https://www.tensorflow.org/api_docs/python/tf/random/stateless_normal

Example:

import tensorflow as tf

seed = tf.placeholder(dtype=tf.int32, shape=[2], name="seed")
randoms = tf.random.stateless_normal(shape=[3], seed=seed)

sess = tf.InteractiveSession()
print(sess.run(randoms, {seed: [1, 0]}))
print(sess.run(randoms, {seed: [1, 0]}))
print(sess.run(randoms, {seed: [2, 0]}))
[ 0.1266503  -0.49301657  0.6311907 ]
[ 0.1266503  -0.49301657  0.6311907 ]
[-0.6394294  -0.18700573 -0.82845527]

However, warning-note from documentation:

The output is consistent across multiple runs on the same hardware (and between CPU and GPU), but may change between versions of TensorFlow or on non-CPU/GPU hardware.

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