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I have a file: file.txt with data:

24/9/2018 15:35:19.380 B63201C<br>
24/9/2018 15:35:22.350 ES0101C(hour_start)<br>
24/9/2018 15:36:13.231 Execute service next : 0003<br>
24/9/2018 15:38:13.664 Result of the execution 0003 Result: 0003<br>
24/9/2018 15:39:10.664 Executing the transaction PE20<br>
24/9/2018 15:35:26.773 ES0101C(hour_end)<br>
24/9/2018 15:36:12.164 B63201C<br>
- 1 bloque -<br>
24/9/2018 17:16:17.428 B63201C<br>
24/9/2018 17:16:29.031 ES0101C(hour_start)<br>
24/9/2018 17:16:13.231 Execute service next : 0003<br>
24/9/2018 17:18:13.664 Result of the execution 0003 Result: 0003<br>
24/9/2018 17:19:10.664 Executing the transaction BE15<br>
24/9/2018 17:25:26.773 ES0101C(hour_end)<br>
24/9/2018 17:26:12.164 B63201C<br>
- 2 bloque -<br>

I need to extract the data in CSV format with these fields:

date,hour_start,hour_end,B63201C-ES0101C,transaction

In other words, the data captured would be:

> 24/9/2018,15:35:22.350,15:35:26.773,B63201C-ES0101C,PE20
> 24/9/2018,17:16:29.031,17:25:26.773,B63201C-ES0101C,BE15

Any way to do it in Bash or with AwK?

  • 1
    please always wrap your samples in code tags. Please do add more details in your post as it is not clear and do let us know on same then. – RavinderSingh13 Oct 5 '18 at 14:16
  • @RaviderSingh13 ... apologies – kdetony Oct 5 '18 at 14:29
  • What do B63201C and ES0101C have to do with parsing this file? Will there be different values, or do you want to filter on these, or ... what? – glenn jackman Oct 5 '18 at 15:04
  • B63201C and ES0101C are repetitive words in the order they comment, so they are generated in the log, after placing that combination, I must extract the requested data – kdetony Oct 9 '18 at 16:01
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#!awk -f
/Executing the transaction / {
  sub("<br>","")
  transaction=$NF
}
/\(hour_start\)/ {
  date=$1
  hour_start=$2
  id1=prev
}
/\(hour_end\)/ {
  hour_end=$2
  split($3,a,"(")
  id2=a[1]
  printf "%s,%s,%s,%s-%s,%s\n", date, hour_start, hour_end, id1, id2, transaction
}
{
  sub("<br>","")
  prev=$3
}

Example with the code in an executable file named script and your example input in input:

$ ./script input
24/9/2018,15:35:22.350,15:35:26.773,B63201C-ES0101C,PE20
24/9/2018,17:16:29.031,17:25:26.773,B63201C-ES0101C,BE15
  • regards, one a question, and if the words B63201C-ES0101C were in column 15, would replace $ 3 for $ 15? – kdetony Oct 9 '18 at 17:08
  • Yes. You can also use $NF if it's the last column. – Camusensei Oct 11 '18 at 6:37

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