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I am new into blockchain technology and I'd like to start my project with product authentication. I am curious if it would be good choice to make use of it.

For example lets say I got some real physical products and I want to check their originality. They got their unique serial number or attached electronic identifier (RFID for example).

According to this simple python blockchain: https://medium.com/crypto-currently/lets-build-the-tiniest-blockchain-e70965a248b

In the block class

class Block:
  def __init__(self, index, timestamp, data, previous_hash):
    self.index = index
    self.timestamp = timestamp
    self.data = data
    self.previous_hash = previous_hash
    self.hash = self.hash_block()

We would create new block every time some product will be scanned (for example by phone). What info should be in data then? Product name, serial number, action type?

At the start, right after all the products have been created, everyone will be initial scanned. So for example for 100 first initial products and theirs scans, there would be 100 blocks in blockchain.

How the authentication process can works here? Is there a way to scan some product (its ID) and use this blockchain database to make sure its original one? Is that technology useful in that situation?

  • I think you mean product verification. Authentication doesn't make any sense. Did you mean verification everywhere instead of authentication? – DaveIdito Oct 9 '18 at 8:55
  • I think I want to do an authentication orginality some product by verification it using blockchain technology – Piodo Oct 9 '18 at 11:37
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Yes, the use-case is actually a pretty standard one. There are many such examples in the supply-chain management industry regarding such uses. Everledger for instance, verifies diamond pieces and their origin.

How the authentication process can works here? Is there a way to scan some product (its ID) and use this blockchain database to make sure its original one? Is that technology useful in that situation?

I think you should refer to it as product (origin) verification. It is quite simple as long as you abstract out the blockchain technology itself. This is what I mean by abstracting out the blockchain technology- think of a blockchain as an immutable ledger (database) in which data can be inserted once, but then can never be changed or removed from the middle, and you can always read from it.

Just assume there is a blockchain technology (I'll add the details about the blockchain in the end.) Now, by definition, you can always add data to it, in your case some tracking number/ QR/ ID, etc. When you have to verify the product, you have to make sure that the entry exists in the blockchain for the corresponding product. Simple as that. And yes, this is one of the best known use cases of the blockchain, especially in a shared data ecosystem with multiple systems interacting with the same database.

The article that you're referring to is a very simple explanation of a blockchain from a programmer's perspective. Block time, block frequency are all variables that vary for different use cases. I'd suggest you look into already mature blockchain technologies and deploy them, and focus on your use case. You can use Ethereum technology as a local node. You can then use web3.py, a very mature Python library to interact with your blockchain. Or you can simply use distributed ledger, Hyperledger Projects would be an example, or even simpler (and in my opinion, much better) BigchainDB. With all these technolgies, you can store any kind of information you like on the blockchain.

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