4
L = [random.randint(0,50) for i in range(5) random.randint(0,12) for i in range(2)]

How do I get it to pick 5 random numbers between (0,50), then 2 random numbers between(0,12)?

4
  • whats your desired output? and don't name your list list
    – SuperStew
    Oct 5 '18 at 17:09
  • List comprehensions are just for loops that build a list. If you can express your needs in a regular for loop with a list.append(...) part, then you can probably make it a list comprehension too.
    – Martijn Pieters
    Oct 5 '18 at 17:11
  • It's only named list on here, Not in my actual code. My desired outcome is a list of 7 random numbers, 5 that have been picked from a range of (0,50) and 2 that have been picked from a range of (0,12)
    – Lewis
    Oct 5 '18 at 17:11
  • You may be interested in the timeit results I've added to my answer.
    – PM 2Ring
    Oct 5 '18 at 18:53
8

You can vary the second argument to randint() based on the value of i:

[randint(0, 50 if i < 5 else 12) for i in range(7)]

The 50 if i < 5 else 12 expression will change what is passed to random.randint() for the last two iterations.

There are many more variations you can spell this in. List comprehensions are a bunch of loops and if filters that repeatedly execute the expression at the front. There are lots of ways to spell vary the arguments to a function call based on the iteration values in expressions.

For example, you could record those arguments in functools.partial() objects:

from functools import partial
from random import randint

rint50 = partial(randint, 0, 50)
rint12 = partial(randint, 0, 12)
[rint() for rint in [rint50] * 5 + [rint12] * 2]

The possibilities are endless. Lambdas, randint(0, upperbound), randint(*args), a function that'll vary its results depending on how often it has been called, etc. But I wouldn't argue that any of these are actually more readable or understandable.

For this case, with just 7 values, I'd just concatenate the two lists:

[randint(0, 50) for _ in range(5)] + [randint(0, 12) for _ in range(2)]

as it's just cleaner and more readable. The small performance cost of creating a 3rd list that contains the results of the two list comprehensions is negligible here.

2
  • Nice! I think the only thing I don't like about list comprehension is readability.
    – artomason
    Oct 5 '18 at 17:18
  • 1
    @artomason: that depends on how you are are using them. Here, the expression is easily too ugly.
    – Martijn Pieters
    Oct 5 '18 at 17:19
4

Something like this maybe, concatenating 2 lists:

from random import randint
my_list = [randint(0,50) for i in range(5)] + [randint(0,12) for i in range(2)]
1
  • Perfect man, Thank you! I must have missed it in my frustration!
    – Lewis
    Oct 5 '18 at 17:15
3

Don't reuse the name list. One way would be to loop through an iterable of the bounds, and send those to randint

from random import randint

lst = [randint(*bounds) for bounds in [(0, 50)]*5 + [(0, 12)]*2]

You could also use itertools.chain and itertools.repeat to avoid building that list of bounds

lst = [randint(*bounds) for bounds in chain(repeat((0, 50), 5), repeat((0, 12), 2))]
1
import random
l = [random.randint(0,50) for i in range(5)]
l.extend([random.randint(0,12) for i in range(2)])

print(l)
1

Here's another variation that avoids doing an if test on every iteration. It also uses randrange, which is slightly more efficient than randint.

from random import randrange
lst = [randrange(hi) for num, hi in ((5, 51), (2, 13)) for _ in range(num)]
print(lst)

typical output

[10, 31, 46, 25, 23, 6, 5]

This is equivalent to

lst = []
for num, hi in ((5, 51), (2, 13)):
    for _ in range(num):
        lst.append(randrange(hi))

The outer loop selects num, the number of items in the sublist, and hi the size of the random range for that sublist; the inner loop generates the required amount of random numbers in the desired range.


FWIW, here's some timeit code comparing the various algorithms that have been submitted. It also verifies that they produce the same results when given the same random seed. My simple verification code uses eval, so it can only test expressions, not statements, so it can't test jpp's or Abhishek's code; besides, jpp's Numpy code gives different results anyway, since it uses a different seeding algorithm. Please see the timeit docs for info on what timeit does, and how to interpret the results.

from timeit import Timer
import random
from random import randint, randrange, seed
from itertools import chain, repeat, starmap
from functools import partial
import numpy as np

imports = 'random, randint, randrange, seed, chain, repeat, starmap, partial, np'

commands = (
    ('Martijn', '', '[randint(0, 50 if i < 5 else 12) for i in range(7)]'),
    ('Martijn_partial', 
        'rint50 = partial(randint, 0, 50); rint12 = partial(randint, 0, 12)', 
        '[rint() for rint in [rint50] * 5 + [rint12] * 2]'
    ),
    ('Patrick', '', '[randint(*bounds) for bounds in [(0, 50)]*5 + [(0, 12)]*2]'),
    ('Patrick_chain', '', 
        '[randint(*bounds) for bounds in chain(repeat((0, 50), 5), repeat((0, 12), 2))]'
    ),
    ('Ralf', '', '[randint(0,50) for i in range(5)] + [randint(0,12) for i in range(2)]'),
    ('Abhishek', '', 'l = [random.randint(0,50) for i in range(5)];'
        'l.extend([random.randint(0,12) for i in range(2)])'
    ),
    ('PM 2Ring', '', '[randrange(hi) for num, hi in ((5, 51), (2, 13)) for _ in range(num)]'),
    ('jpp', '', 'A = np.zeros(7); ' 
        'A[:5] = np.random.randint(0, 20, 5); A[5:] = np.random.randint(0, 12, 2)'
    ),
    ('Tanmay jain', '', 
        '[random.randint(0,50) if i < 5 else random.randint(0,12) for i in range(7)]'
    ),
    ('juanpa', '', '[random.randint(a,b) for args in (((0,50) for _ in range(5)),' 
        '((0, 12) for _ in range(2))) for a, b in args]'
    ),
    ('juanpa_starmap', '', 'list(starmap(random.randint,'
        'chain(repeat((0,50),5), repeat((0,12),2))))'
    ),
)

def verify():
    for name, setup, cmd in commands:
        if name in ('jpp', 'Abhishek'):
            continue
        seed(17)
        if setup:
            exec(setup)
        print('{:16}: {}'.format(name, eval(cmd)))
    print()

def time_test(loops):
    timings = []
    print('loops =', loops)
    for name, setup, cmd in commands:
        setup = 'from __main__ import ' + imports + ';' + setup
        t = Timer(cmd, setup=setup)
        result = sorted(t.repeat(3, loops))
        timings.append((result, name))
    timings.sort()
    for result, name in timings:
        print('{:16} : {}'.format(name, result))

verify()
time_test(5000)

typical output

Martijn         : [33, 26, 19, 23, 18, 2, 12]
Martijn_partial : [33, 26, 19, 23, 18, 2, 12]
Patrick         : [33, 26, 19, 23, 18, 2, 12]
Patrick_chain   : [33, 26, 19, 23, 18, 2, 12]
Ralf            : [33, 26, 19, 23, 18, 2, 12]
PM 2Ring        : [33, 26, 19, 23, 18, 2, 12]
Tanmay jain     : [33, 26, 19, 23, 18, 2, 12]
juanpa          : [33, 26, 19, 23, 18, 2, 12]
juanpa_starmap  : [33, 26, 19, 23, 18, 2, 12]

loops = 5000
jpp              : [0.23938178099342622, 0.24184146700281417, 0.3152835669970955]
PM 2Ring         : [0.26918871099769603, 0.27244400099880295, 0.2916741489971173]
Patrick          : [0.34155847399961203, 0.34415175200410886, 0.3531294650019845]
juanpa_starmap   : [0.3417540490045212, 0.34329504700144753, 0.3438059809996048]
Martijn          : [0.3509639670010074, 0.362117896998825, 0.547288200003095]
Martijn_partial  : [0.3511254819968599, 0.35262946599686984, 0.39430355399963446]
Patrick_chain    : [0.3541102219969616, 0.3545923809942906, 0.3555165420038975]
Tanmay jain      : [0.3558294050017139, 0.5510739650053438, 0.7693202439986635]
Ralf             : [0.3678122450000956, 0.44522786799643654, 0.44827762299973983]
juanpa           : [0.4089203829935286, 0.41227930299646687, 0.42410747800022364]
Abhishek         : [0.4811078249986167, 0.4942625819967361, 0.6255962599971099]

As you can see, jpp's Numpy code is the fastest. I expect that the speed difference would be even more apparent if we were generating a longer list of numbers.

These timing were performed on an ancient 32 bit single core 2GHz machine, running Python 3.6.0 on a Debian derivative distro. YMMV.


Here are timings for the production of lists (or arrays) of 50 + 20 = 70 values in the same ranges.

loops = 500
jpp              : [0.025625186994147953, 0.025764200996491127, 0.03122780400008196]
PM 2Ring         : [0.21989007600495825, 0.2200367909972556, 0.22065802400175016]
juanpa_starmap   : [0.3094131350007956, 0.3110805670003174, 0.31563361900043674]
Patrick_chain    : [0.3122365829985938, 0.31262181099737063, 0.3137894630053779]
Patrick          : [0.3130071220002719, 0.31769691400404554, 0.3179219129960984]
Ralf             : [0.31566168300196296, 0.3157304769993061, 0.3234770689959987]
Martijn          : [0.3193310350034153, 0.3275600470005884, 0.35491854500287445]
Martijn_partial  : [0.321399387998099, 0.3226969290044508, 0.32442738999816356]
Abhishek         : [0.32655813400197076, 0.3363869300010265, 0.3657162370000151]
Tanmay jain      : [0.32833286200184375, 0.33107244400162017, 0.39565577400207985]
juanpa           : [0.35968791200139094, 0.3754627199959941, 0.3933205349967466]
1
  • 3
    For 7 values, comparing timings is next to meaningless. Looking at this from a perf perspective really is a premature optimisation.
    – Martijn Pieters
    Oct 5 '18 at 19:05
0

If you are happy using a 3rd party library, you can via NumPy:

import numpy as np

np.random.seed(0) # for consistency / testing

A = np.zeros(7)
A[:5] = np.random.randint(0, 20, 5)
A[5:] = np.random.randint(0, 12, 2)

array([ 12.,  15.,   0.,   3.,   3.,   7.,   9.])

The benefit of this method, memory pre-allocation, will be evident with larger arrays.

0
since you want to pick 5 random values from 0 - 50( exclusive)
i = 0...4
and then you want to pick 2 random values from 0 - 12( exclusive)
i = 5 6


lst = [random.randint(0,50) if i < 5 else random.randint(0,12) for i in range(7)]

print(lst) # [7, 10, 40, 4, 38, 1, 5]
0

You can do this using list-comprehensions and only built-ins, some monstrosity like:

>>> result = [
...     random.randint(a,b)
...     for args in (((0,50) for _ in range(5)), ((0, 12) for _ in range(2)))
...     for a, b in args
... ]
>>> result
[33, 38, 19, 9, 47, 0, 8]

Perhaps, if you want to use itertools, you can do something like:

>>> from itertools import chain, repeat, starmap
>>> list(starmap(random.randint, chain(repeat((0,50),5), repeat((0,12),2))))
[16, 47, 40, 21, 15, 12, 4]

Both of these approaches are hardly readable and simple. Instead, I would personally go with two for-loops, the naive approach. It would be efficient, simple, and readable. Other than showboating, I see no advantage to the above approaches in production code.

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