154

For Example I have the date: "23/2/2010" (23th Feb 2010). I want to pass it to a function which would return the day of week. How can I do this?

In this example, the function should return String "Tue".

Additionally, if just the day ordinal is desired, how can that be retrieved?

23 Answers 23

300

Yes. Depending on your exact case:

  • You can use java.util.Calendar:

    Calendar c = Calendar.getInstance();
    c.setTime(yourDate);
    int dayOfWeek = c.get(Calendar.DAY_OF_WEEK);
    
  • if you need the output to be Tue rather than 3 (Days of week are indexed starting at 1), instead of going through a calendar, just reformat the string: new SimpleDateFormat("EE").format(date) (EE meaning "day of week, short version")

  • if you have your input as string, rather than Date, you should use SimpleDateFormat to parse it: new SimpleDateFormat("dd/M/yyyy").parse(dateString)

  • you can use joda-time's DateTime and call dateTime.dayOfWeek() and/or DateTimeFormat.

  • 16
    Days of week start from 1 which is Sunday, so I think Tue would be 3. – Mohammad Banisaeid Aug 7 '13 at 12:03
  • 9
    In other things to be careful of, if you set the date in the Calendar object using integers (not via parsing a string), then be aware that the month number is zero-based, so January is 0 and December is 11. – RenniePet Aug 17 '13 at 19:46
  • 4
    @RenniePet: Good one. Also you can use constants in Calendar class, such as Calendar.SUNDAY or Calendar.JANUARY. – Mohammad Banisaeid Aug 18 '13 at 10:01
  • 1
    This answer was a great answer when it was written. Today you will want to the now outdated classes Calendar, Date and DateTimeFormat (and Joda time too) and use the Java 8 java.time classes, for instance YearMonth or LocalDate. See more in this answer. – Ole V.V. Feb 10 '17 at 19:43
  • 2
    FYI, the troublesome old date-time classes such as java.util.Date, java.util.Calendar, and java.text.SimpleDateFormat are now legacy, supplanted by the java.time classes built into Java 8 & Java 9. See Tutorial by Oracle. – Basil Bourque Nov 3 '17 at 21:25
55
  String input_date="01/08/2012";
  SimpleDateFormat format1=new SimpleDateFormat("dd/MM/yyyy");
  Date dt1=format1.parse(input_date);
  DateFormat format2=new SimpleDateFormat("EEEE"); 
  String finalDay=format2.format(dt1);

Use this code for find the Day name from a input date.Simple and well tested.

24

Simply use SimpleDateFormat.

SimpleDateFormat sdf = new SimpleDateFormat("dd/MM/yyyy", java.util.Locale.ENGLISH);
Date myDate = sdf.parse("28/12/2013");
sdf.applyPattern("EEE, d MMM yyyy");
String sMyDate = sdf.format(myDate);

The result is: Sat, 28 Dec 2013

The default constructor is taking "the default" Locale, so be careful using it when you need a specific pattern.

public SimpleDateFormat(String pattern) {
    this(pattern, Locale.getDefault(Locale.Category.FORMAT));
}
18

tl;dr

Using java.time

LocalDate.parse(                               // Generate `LocalDate` object from String input.
             "23/2/2010" ,
             DateTimeFormatter.ofPattern( "d/M/uuuu" ) 
         )                                    
         .getDayOfWeek()                       // Get `DayOfWeek` enum object.
         .getDisplayName(                      // Localize. Generate a String to represent this day-of-week.
             TextStyle.SHORT_STANDALONE ,      // How long or abbreviated. Some languages have an alternate spelling for "standalone" use (not so in English).
             Locale.US                         // Or Locale.CANADA_FRENCH and such. Specify a `Locale` to determine (1) human language for translation, and (2) cultural norms for abbreviation, punctuation, etc.
         ) 

Tue

See this code run live at IdeOne.com (but only Locale.US works there).

java.time

See my example code above, and see the correct Answer for java.time by Przemek.

Ordinal number

if just the day ordinal is desired, how can that be retrieved?

For ordinal number, consider passing around the DayOfWeek enum object instead such as DayOfWeek.TUESDAY. Keep in mind that a DayOfWeek is a smart object, not just a string or mere integer number. Using those enum objects makes your code more self-documenting, ensures valid values, and provides type-safety.

But if you insist, ask DayOfWeek for a number. You get 1-7 for Monday-Sunday per the ISO 8601 standard.

int ordinal = myLocalDate.getDayOfWeek().getValue() ;

Joda-Time

UPDATE: The Joda-Time project is now in maintenance mode. The team advises migrating to the java.time classes. The java.time framework is built into Java 8 (as well as back-ported to Java 6 & 7 and further adapted to Android).

Here is example code using the Joda-Time library version 2.4, as mentioned in the accepted answer by Bozho. Joda-Time is far superior to the java.util.Date/.Calendar classes bundled with Java.

LocalDate

Joda-Time offers the LocalDate class to represent a date-only without any time-of-day or time zone. Just what this Question calls for. The old java.util.Date/.Calendar classes bundled with Java lack this concept.

Parse

Parse the string into a date value.

String input = "23/2/2010";
DateTimeFormatter formatter = DateTimeFormat.forPattern( "d/M/yyyy" );
LocalDate localDate = formatter.parseLocalDate( input );

Extract

Extract from the date value the day of week number and name.

int dayOfWeek = localDate.getDayOfWeek(); // Follows ISO 8601 standard, where Monday = 1, Sunday = 7.
Locale locale = Locale.US;  // Locale specifies the human language to use in determining day-of-week name (Tuesday in English versus Mardi in French).
DateTimeFormatter formatterOutput = DateTimeFormat.forPattern( "E" ).withLocale( locale );
String output = formatterOutput.print( localDate ); // 'E' is code for abbreviation of day-of-week name. See Joda-Time doc.
String outputQuébécois = formatterOutput.withLocale( Locale.CANADA_FRENCH ).print( localDate );

Dump

Dump to console.

System.out.println( "input: " + input );
System.out.println( "localDate: " + localDate ); // Defaults to ISO 8601 formatted strings.
System.out.println( "dayOfWeek: " + dayOfWeek );
System.out.println( "output: " + output );
System.out.println( "outputQuébécois: " + outputQuébécois );

Run

When run.

input: 23/2/2010
localDate: 2010-02-23
dayOfWeek: 2
output: Tue
outputQuébécois: mar.

About java.time

The java.time framework is built into Java 8 and later. These classes supplant the troublesome old legacy date-time classes such as java.util.Date, Calendar, & SimpleDateFormat.

The Joda-Time project, now in maintenance mode, advises migration to the java.time classes.

To learn more, see the Oracle Tutorial. And search Stack Overflow for many examples and explanations. Specification is JSR 310.

Where to obtain the java.time classes?

The ThreeTen-Extra project extends java.time with additional classes. This project is a proving ground for possible future additions to java.time. You may find some useful classes here such as Interval, YearWeek, YearQuarter, and more.

11

java.time

Using java.time framework built into Java 8 and later.

The DayOfWeek enum can generate a String of the day’s name automatically localized to the human language and cultural norms of a Locale. Specify a TextStyle to indicate you want long form or abbreviated name.

import java.time.LocalDate
import java.time.format.DateTimeFormatter
import java.time.format.TextStyle
import java.util.Locale
import java.time.DayOfWeek;

DateTimeFormatter formatter = DateTimeFormatter.ofPattern("d/M/yyyy");
LocalDate date = LocalDate.parse("23/2/2010", formatter); // LocalDate = 2010-02-23
DayOfWeek dow = date.getDayOfWeek();  // Extracts a `DayOfWeek` enum object.
String output = dow.getDisplayName(TextStyle.SHORT, Locale.US); // String = Tue
6

You can try the following code:

import java.time.*;

public class Test{
   public static void main(String[] args) {
      DayOfWeek dow = LocalDate.of(2010,Month.FEBRUARY,23).getDayOfWeek();
      String s = String.valueOf(dow);
      System.out.println(String.format("%.3s",s));
   }
}
  • How does this answer add value beyond that of the two or three prior answers using LocalDate? Did you read those before posting? – Basil Bourque Jun 24 '16 at 1:33
  • 1
    This is a good answer, and it IS different from all previous ones. It uses LocalDate.of() API to construct date, and it is much shorter than most other answers (sometimes short answer is better than long)... – Alexey Aug 2 '16 at 2:26
6
public class TryDateFormats {
    public static void main(String[] args) throws ParseException {
        String month = "08";
        String day = "05";
        String year = "2015";
        String inputDateStr = String.format("%s/%s/%s", day, month, year);
        Date inputDate = new SimpleDateFormat("dd/MM/yyyy").parse(inputDateStr);
        Calendar calendar = Calendar.getInstance();
        calendar.setTime(inputDate);
        String dayOfWeek = calendar.getDisplayName(Calendar.DAY_OF_WEEK, Calendar.LONG, Locale.US).toUpperCase();
        System.out.println(dayOfWeek);
    }
}
5

Another "fun" way is to use Doomsday algorithm. It's a way longer method but it's also faster if you don't need to create a Calendar object with a given date.

import java.text.ParseException;
import java.text.SimpleDateFormat;
import java.util.ArrayList;
import java.util.Calendar;
import java.util.HashMap;
import java.util.Map;
import java.util.Random;

/**
 *
 * @author alain.janinmanificat
 */
public class Doomsday {

    public static HashMap<Integer, ArrayList<Integer>> anchorDaysMap = new HashMap<>();
    public static HashMap<Integer, Integer> doomsdayDate = new HashMap<>();
    public static String weekdays[] = new DateFormatSymbols(Locale.FRENCH).getWeekdays();

    /**
     * @param args the command line arguments
     */
    public static void main(String[] args) throws ParseException, ParseException {

        // Map is fed manually but we can use this to calculate it : http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Doomsday_rule#Finding_a_century.27s_anchor_day
        anchorDaysMap.put(Integer.valueOf(0), new ArrayList<Integer>() {
            {
                add(Integer.valueOf(1700));
                add(Integer.valueOf(2100));
                add(Integer.valueOf(2500));
            }
        });

        anchorDaysMap.put(Integer.valueOf(2), new ArrayList<Integer>() {
            {
                add(Integer.valueOf(1600));
                add(Integer.valueOf(2000));
                add(Integer.valueOf(2400));
            }
        });

        anchorDaysMap.put(Integer.valueOf(3), new ArrayList<Integer>() {
            {
                add(Integer.valueOf(1500));
                add(Integer.valueOf(1900));
                add(Integer.valueOf(2300));
            }
        });

        anchorDaysMap.put(Integer.valueOf(5), new ArrayList<Integer>() {
            {
                add(Integer.valueOf(1800));
                add(Integer.valueOf(2200));
                add(Integer.valueOf(2600));
            }
        });

        //Some reference date that always land on Doomsday
        doomsdayDate.put(Integer.valueOf(1), Integer.valueOf(3));
        doomsdayDate.put(Integer.valueOf(2), Integer.valueOf(14));
        doomsdayDate.put(Integer.valueOf(3), Integer.valueOf(14));
        doomsdayDate.put(Integer.valueOf(4), Integer.valueOf(4));
        doomsdayDate.put(Integer.valueOf(5), Integer.valueOf(9));
        doomsdayDate.put(Integer.valueOf(6), Integer.valueOf(6));
        doomsdayDate.put(Integer.valueOf(7), Integer.valueOf(4));
        doomsdayDate.put(Integer.valueOf(8), Integer.valueOf(8));
        doomsdayDate.put(Integer.valueOf(9), Integer.valueOf(5));
        doomsdayDate.put(Integer.valueOf(10), Integer.valueOf(10));
        doomsdayDate.put(Integer.valueOf(11), Integer.valueOf(7));
        doomsdayDate.put(Integer.valueOf(12), Integer.valueOf(12));

        long time = System.currentTimeMillis();
        for (int i = 0; i < 100000; i++) {

            //Get a random date
            int year = 1583 + new Random().nextInt(500);
            int month = 1 + new Random().nextInt(12);
            int day = 1 + new Random().nextInt(7);

            //Get anchor day and DoomsDay for current date
            int twoDigitsYear = (year % 100);
            int century = year - twoDigitsYear;
            int adForCentury = getADCentury(century);
            int dd = ((int) twoDigitsYear / 12) + twoDigitsYear % 12 + (int) ((twoDigitsYear % 12) / 4);

            //Get the gap between current date and a reference DoomsDay date
            int referenceDay = doomsdayDate.get(month);
            int gap = (day - referenceDay) % 7;

            int result = (gap + adForCentury + dd) % 7;

            if(result<0){
                result*=-1;
            }
            String dayDate= weekdays[(result + 1) % 8];
            //System.out.println("day:" + dayDate);
        }
        System.out.println("time (ms) : " + (System.currentTimeMillis() - time)); //time (ms) : 80

         time = System.currentTimeMillis();
        for (int i = 0; i < 100000; i++) {
            Calendar c = Calendar.getInstance();
            //I should have used random date here too, but it's already slower this way
            c.setTime(new SimpleDateFormat("dd/MM/yyyy").parse("12/04/1861"));
//            System.out.println(new SimpleDateFormat("EE").format(c.getTime()));
            int result2 = c.get(Calendar.DAY_OF_WEEK);
//            System.out.println("day idx :"+ result2);
        }
        System.out.println("time (ms) : " + (System.currentTimeMillis() - time)); //time (ms) : 884
    }

    public static int getADCentury(int century) {
        for (Map.Entry<Integer, ArrayList<Integer>> entry : anchorDaysMap.entrySet()) {
            if (entry.getValue().contains(Integer.valueOf(century))) {
                return entry.getKey();
            }
        }
        return 0;
    }
}
4
...
import java.time.LocalDate;
...
//String month = in.next();
int mm = in.nextInt();
//String day = in.next();
int dd = in.nextInt();
//String year = in.next();
int yy = in.nextInt();
in.close();
LocalDate dt = LocalDate.of(yy, mm, dd);
System.out.print(dt.getDayOfWeek());
3
private String getDay(Date date){

    SimpleDateFormat simpleDateFormat = new SimpleDateFormat("EEEE");
    //System.out.println("DAY "+simpleDateFormat.format(date).toUpperCase());                       
    return simpleDateFormat.format(date).toUpperCase();
}

private String getDay(String dateStr){
    //dateStr must be in DD-MM-YYYY Formate
    Date date = null;
    String day=null;

    try {
        date = new SimpleDateFormat("DD-MM-YYYY").parse(dateStr);

        SimpleDateFormat simpleDateFormat = new SimpleDateFormat("EEEE");
        //System.out.println("DAY "+simpleDateFormat.format(date).toUpperCase());
        day = simpleDateFormat.format(date).toUpperCase();


    } catch (ParseException e) {
        // TODO Auto-generated catch block
        e.printStackTrace();
    }


    return day;
}
3

Can use the following code snippet for input like (day = "08", month = "05", year = "2015" and output will be "WEDNESDAY")

Calendar calendar = Calendar.getInstance();
calendar.set(Calendar.DAY_OF_MONTH, Integer.parseInt(day));
calendar.set(Calendar.MONTH, (Integer.parseInt(month)-1));
calendar.set(Calendar.YEAR, Integer.parseInt(year));
String dayOfWeek = calendar.getDisplayName(Calendar.DAY_OF_WEEK, Calendar.LONG, Locale.US).toUpperCase();
  • 1
    This Answer is ill-advised, using troublesome old date-time that are now legacy, supplanted by the modern java.time classes. – Basil Bourque Dec 19 '17 at 6:41
  • 1
    This is the question asked on Hackerrank. – Prathamesh More Aug 16 '18 at 14:51
3

One line answer:

return LocalDate.parse("06/02/2018",DateTimeFormatter.ofPattern("dd/MM/yyyy")).getDayOfWeek().name();

Usage Example:

public static String getDayOfWeek(String date){
  return LocalDate.parse(date, DateTimeFormatter.ofPattern("dd/MM/yyyy")).getDayOfWeek().name();
}

public static void callerMethod(){
   System.out.println(getDayOfWeek("06/02/2018")); //TUESDAY
}
2
import java.text.SimpleDateFormat;
import java.util.Scanner;

class DayFromDate {

    public static void main(String args[]) {

        System.out.println("Enter the date(dd/mm/yyyy):");
        Scanner scan = new Scanner(System.in);
        String Date = scan.nextLine();

        try {
            boolean dateValid = dateValidate(Date);

            if(dateValid == true) {
                SimpleDateFormat df = new SimpleDateFormat( "dd/MM/yy" );  
                java.util.Date date = df.parse( Date );   
                df.applyPattern( "EEE" );  
                String day= df.format( date ); 

                if(day.compareTo("Sat") == 0 || day.compareTo("Sun") == 0) {
                    System.out.println(day + ": Weekend");
                } else {
                    System.out.println(day + ": Weekday");
                }
            } else {
                System.out.println("Invalid Date!!!");
            }
        } catch(Exception e) {
            System.out.println("Invalid Date Formats!!!");
        }
     }

    static public boolean dateValidate(String d) {

        String dateArray[] = d.split("/");
        int day = Integer.parseInt(dateArray[0]);
        int month = Integer.parseInt(dateArray[1]);
        int year = Integer.parseInt(dateArray[2]);
        System.out.print(day + "\n" + month + "\n" + year + "\n");
        boolean leapYear = false;

        if((year % 4 == 0) && (year % 100 != 0) || (year % 400 == 0)) {
            leapYear = true;
        }

        if(year > 2099 || year < 1900)
            return false;

        if(month < 13) {
            if(month == 1 || month == 3 || month == 5 || month == 7 || month == 8 || month == 10 || month == 12) {
                if(day > 31)
                    return false;
            } else if(month == 4 || month == 6 || month == 9 || month == 11) {
                if(day > 30)
                    return false;
            } else if(leapYear == true && month == 2) {
                if(day > 29)
                    return false;
            } else if(leapYear == false && month == 2) {
                if(day > 28)
                    return false;
            }

            return true;    
        } else return false;
    }
}
1
Calendar cal = Calendar.getInstance(desired date);
cal.setTimeInMillis(System.currentTimeMillis());
int dayOfWeek = cal.get(Calendar.DAY_OF_WEEK);

Get the day value by providing the current time stamp.

1
LocalDate date=LocalDate.now();

System.out.println(date.getDayOfWeek());//prints THURSDAY
System.out.println(date.getDayOfWeek().getDisplayName(TextStyle.SHORT, Locale.US) );  //prints Thu   
java.time.DayOfWeek is a enum which returns the singleton instance for the day-of-week of the weekday of the date.
1

There is a challenge on hackerrank Java Date and Time

personally, I prefer the LocalDate class.

  1. Import java.time.LocalDate
  2. Retrieve localDate by using "of" method which takes 3 arguments in "int" format.
  3. finally, get the name of that day using "getDayOfWeek" method.

There is one video on this challenge.

Java Date and Time Hackerrank solution

I hope it will help :)

  • If any other coming here for HackerRank Java Date and Time and want to use that Calendar Class, Please note that the set method in Calendar takes months starting from 0. ie, 0 for January. Thank you! – Sagar Devkota Jan 3 at 12:30
1

Adding another way of doing it exactly what the OP asked for, without using latest inbuilt methods:

public static String getDay(String inputDate) {
    String dayOfWeek = null;
    String[] days = new String[]{"Mon", "Tue", "Wed", "Thu", "Fri", "Sat", "Sun"};

    try {
        SimpleDateFormat format1 = new SimpleDateFormat("dd/MM/yyyy");
        Date dt1 = format1.parse(inputDate);
        dayOfWeek = days[dt1.getDay() - 1];
    } catch(Exception e) {
        System.out.println(e);
    }

    return dayOfWeek;
}
  • 1
    While this code may answer the question, providing additional context regarding why and/or how this code answers the question improves its long-term value. – Alex Riabov Jul 15 '18 at 10:31
  • 1
    This is in more than one way the discouraged way of doing it. Your code cannot be compiled. You shouldn’t use the long outdated and poorly designed classes SimpleDateFormat and Date. In particular you should not use the deprecated getDay method, it’s not reliable. And you shouldn’t use if-else for selecting among 7 values, this what we have switch for, or you may use an array. All in all your code is both longer and more complicated than it needs be. – Ole V.V. Jul 15 '18 at 14:11
  • 1
    And use the built-in month abbreviations rather than supplying your own. Simpler and less error-prone. – Ole V.V. Jul 15 '18 at 17:26
  • 1
    The troublesome classes used here were supplanted years ago by the java.time classes. Suggesting their use in 2018 is poor advice. – Basil Bourque Jul 15 '18 at 23:48
0

You can use below method to get Day of the Week by passing a specific date,

Here for the set method of Calendar class, Tricky part is the index for the month parameter will starts from 0.

public static String getDay(int day, int month, int year) {

        Calendar cal = Calendar.getInstance();

        if(month==1){
            cal.set(year,0,day);
        }else{
            cal.set(year,month-1,day);
        }

        int dow = cal.get(Calendar.DAY_OF_WEEK);

        switch (dow) {
        case 1:
            return "SUNDAY";
        case 2:
            return "MONDAY";
        case 3:
            return "TUESDAY";
        case 4:
            return "WEDNESDAY";
        case 5:
            return "THURSDAY";
        case 6:
            return "FRIDAY";
        case 7:
            return "SATURDAY";
        default:
            System.out.println("GO To Hell....");
        }

        return null;
    }
  • 2
    This Answer is ill-advised, using terrible old date-time classes that are now legacy, supplanted by the java.time classes. Also, this code ignores the crucial issue of time zone after awkwardly applying a date-time class to a date-only problem. Instead, see the correct Answer for java.time by Przemek. – Basil Bourque Nov 3 '17 at 14:55
0

Calendar class has build-in displayName functionality:

Calendar.getInstance().getDisplayName(Calendar.DAY_OF_WEEK, Calendar.SHORT, Locale.getDefault()); // Thu   

Calendar.SHORT -> Thu
Calendar.LONG_FORMAT -> Thursday

Available since Java 1.6. See also Oracle documentation

0
//to get day of any date

import java.util.Scanner; 
import java.util.Calendar; 
import java.util.Date;

public class Show {

    public static String getDay(String day,String month, String year){


            String input_date = month+"/"+day+"/"+year;

            Date now = new Date(input_date);
            Calendar calendar = Calendar.getInstance();
            calendar.setTime(now);
            int final_day = (calendar.get(Calendar.DAY_OF_WEEK));

            String finalDay[]={"SUNDAY","MONDAY","TUESDAY","WEDNESDAY","THURSDAY","FRIDAY","SATURDAY"};

            System.out.println(finalDay[final_day-1]);

    }

    public static void main(String[] args) { 
            Scanner in = new Scanner(System.in); 
            String month = in.next(); 
        String day = in.next();
            String year = in.next();

            getDay(day, month, year);
    }

}
  • 2
    It would be useful to add some explanation of the answer to compliment the code. – ritlew Jul 12 '18 at 15:35
0

This works correctly...

java.time.LocalDate; //package related to time and date

It provides inbuilt method getDayOfWeek() to get the day of a particular week:

int t;
Scanner s = new Scanner(System.in);
t = s.nextInt();
s.nextLine();
 while(t-->0) { 
    int d, m, y;
    String ss = s.nextLine();
    String []sss = ss.split(" ");
    d=Integer.parseInt(sss[0]);
    m = Integer.parseInt(sss[1]);
    y = Integer.parseInt(sss[2]);

    LocalDate l = LocalDate.of(y, m, d); //method to get the localdate instance
    System.out.println(l.getDayOfWeek()); //this returns the enum DayOfWeek

To assign the value of enum l.getDayOfWeek() to a string, you could probably use the method of Enum called name() that returns the value of enum object.

  • 2
    Answers on Stack Overflow are better if they include some explanation as well as code snippet. – Basil Bourque Nov 18 '18 at 16:58
  • @David, I have been looking for difference in my edit and yours, I can't find it. Would be nice to get the info how to edit. – OrdinaryDraft Mar 4 at 12:46
  • @OrdinaryDraft you added a listHolidays.add(LocalDate.of(year, 1, 1)); to the answer. If you want to improve the answer, you should add your own. Hope that helps – David Mar 5 at 11:53
  • Yes, I later checked my edit to compare with your version. It seems I copied that line by mistake. – OrdinaryDraft Mar 5 at 12:15
0

Program to find the day of the week by giving user input date month and year using java.util.scanner package:

import java.util.Scanner;

public class Calender {
    public static String getDay(String day, String month, String year) {

        int ym, yp, d, ay, a = 0;
        int by = 20;
        int[] y = new int[]{6, 4, 2, 0};
        int[] m = new int []{0, 3, 3, 6, 1, 4, 6, 2, 5, 0, 3, 5};

        String[] wd = {"Sunday", "Monday", "Tuesday", "Wednesday", "Thursday", "Friday", "Saturday"};

        int gd = Integer.parseInt(day);
        int gm = Integer.parseInt(month);
        int gy = Integer.parseInt(year);

        ym = gy % 100;
        yp = ym / 4;
        ay = gy / 100;

        while (ay != by) {
            by = by + 1;
            a = a + 1;

            if(a == 4) {
                a = 0;
            }
        }

        if ((ym % 4 == 0) && (gm == 2)) {
            d = (gd + m[gm - 1] + ym + yp + y[a] - 1) % 7;
        } else
            d = (gd + m[gm - 1] + ym + yp + y[a]) % 7;

        return wd[d];
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) {

        Scanner in = new Scanner(System.in);

        String day = in.next();
        String month = in.next();
        String year = in.next();

        System.out.println(getDay(day, month, year));
    }
}
-3

Below is the two line of snippet using Java 1.8 Time API for your Requirement.

LocalDate localDate = LocalDate.of(Integer.valueOf(year),Integer.valueOf(month),Integer.valueOf(day));
String dayOfWeek = String.valueOf(localDate.getDayOfWeek());
  • 1
    The approach shown here has been covered already in at least 4 good Answers posted long ago. I see no value added by this duplicate. – Basil Bourque Dec 24 '17 at 17:31

protected by Mohammad Usman Jul 15 '18 at 10:29

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