9

I have a templated struct that has a variant with an extra float, like this:

template <bool HasFloat>
struct Foo {
   std::vector<int> a;
   float b; // Not needed if HasFloat is false
};

To save memory (yes it is significant) I'd like to omit that float if HasFloat is false. Since there is a lot of other stuff in the struct the best way would be something like this:

using B = typename std::conditional<HasFloat, float, ZeroSizedType>::type;
B b;

Except there is no such thing as a zero sized type in C++ as far as I can tell. The only exception seems to be "Flexible Array Members", so I could maybe do something like this:

using B = typename std::conditional<HasFloat, float, float[]>::type;

Except they are only supported in C99, not C++.

The standard solution to this seems to be to use inheritance, since base classes can be zero-sized, however my struct is also accessed by assembly and to make the assembly simpler it is better if the float b; is at the end of the struct rather than the beginning, and anyway that isn't guaranteed.

So this seems to leave template specialisation as the only option but my class is actually rather long and I'd like to avoid duplicating everything. Is there another solution that I'm missing?

  • You can put everything that is not dependent on specialization into base class, and than have two versions which inherit from that - one specialized for false case, and another not. – SergeyA Oct 8 '18 at 14:11
  • I can't - see the penultimate paragraph. – Timmmm Oct 8 '18 at 14:12
  • 1
    You seem to be somewhere on the fence. You want guaranteed layout (which standard doesn't really guarantee), but at the same time, you seem to be want strict standard conformance (otherwise you could just use your fav compiler's extension for flexible array member or zero-size arrays) – SergeyA Oct 8 '18 at 14:40
  • 4
    Not an answer, but C++20 will have the [[no_unique_address]] attribute to allow an empty struct member to have zero size. – aschepler Oct 8 '18 at 14:41
  • 1
    @Timmmm not really, for example, there can be unspecified padding between members. – SergeyA Oct 8 '18 at 14:43
2

One of my colleagues came up with a fairly nice solution. It does require copy & pasting the data members but at least I don't have to duplicate my methods.

template <bool HasFloat>
struct Foo {
  struct State {
    std::vector<int> a;
  };

  struct StateWithFloat {
    std::vector<int> a;
    float k;
  };

  using FooState = std::conditional_t<HasFloat, StateWithFloat, State>;
  FooState state;
};

You could do:

  struct StateWithFloat {
    State state;
    float k;
  };

But then you have to add template functions to avoid the state.a vs state.state.a problem and copy & pasting seems easier at that point.

Also @aschepler pointed out that in C++20 you will be able to use [[no_unique_address]].

-2

You can create a struct specializing for has float or not, and then use it in your struct forwarding the template parameter. Something like this:

template <bool HasFloat>
struct PerhapsFloat;

template <>
struct PerhapsFloat<true>
{
    float b;
};

template <>
struct PerhapsFloat<false>
{

};

template <bool HasFloat>
struct Foo {
   std::vector<int> a;
   PerhapsFloat<HasFloat> b;
};

Here, you have a demo: https://godbolt.org/z/7zPto9

  • 2
    This is still going to use at least 1 byte, OP is well aware of that. This adds nothing to the question. – SergeyA Oct 8 '18 at 14:37
  • Why you did not check your own code. For me both structs have size 32. If you prepare an example, also on godbolt, why you did not run it? – Klaus Oct 8 '18 at 17:11
-3

Try to extract the specialization to a base/member class.

template <bool B>
struct Foo {};

template <>
struct Foo<true>
{
    float f;    
};

template <bool HasFloat>
class Bar 
{
    Foo<HasFloat> b;
};

class Empty {};

int main()
{
    std::cout << sizeof(Bar<true>) << std::endl; // 4
    std::cout << sizeof(Bar<false>) << std::endl; // 1
    std::cout << sizeof(Empty) << std::endl; // 1
}
  • 2
    Empty structs are not zero-sized. – Timmmm Oct 8 '18 at 14:43

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.