I have the following objective that I want to accomplish:

I have two tables. One of the tables (Table_one) has a column called 'Sentence'. It has the values as follows below:

SENTENCE
I live in New York
A bad day
A very good day

I have another table (Table_two) with a column called 'Text' in the form:

TEXT
New York
good day
very good day

I wan to match phrases in 'Text' to sentences in 'Sentences' to see if they are contained in any of the 'sentences' observations. I want to output those sentences that do contain the text.

I understand that this s not difficult in and of itself, but I have a unique case that I could not find much info online.

What I want is a table that results in:

MATCH
I live in New York
A very good day
A very good day

I've tried the following code:

proc sql;
create table match as 
select a.* from table_one as a, table_two as b
where find(a.Sentence, b.Text)>0
;
run; 

What I get is the below result:

MATCH
I live in New York
A very good day

In other words, since the observations in Table_two: 'good day' & 'very good day' both are contained in the sentence of Table_one: 'A very good day', it is treated like a single observation and returned only once in the output.

I however would like both of the phrases to be treated like individual observations and be output twice like my desired output.

I have tried both the FIND() and INDEX() functions. But both give me the same results.

Is there anyway to avoid the single observation output and get two separate observations even if there are phrases in the same sentence?

Any help would be greatly appreciated.

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Not sure why you are getting distinct results when you are not requesting them. You might have variable length issues, or require TRIM of the find sub-string The following example shows the query results are what you want when trim is used.

data phrases;
length sentence $200;
input; SENTENCE = _infile_; datalines;
I live in New York
A bad day
A very good day
data terms;
length text $30;
input; text = _infile_; datalines;
New York
good day
very good day
run;

proc sql;
create table match as 
select 
  phrases.*, text as matched_on
from 
  phrases, terms
where 
  find(phrases.Sentence, trim(terms.Text))>0
;
quit;

Remove the , text as matched_on and you will get the same number of rows in the result

  • FIND has a modifier t or T trims trailing blanks from string and substring. – data _null_ Oct 8 at 17:58
  • This fixed my issue! I was reading the input from datasets that may have had unique encodings. As @Richard mentioned, the culprit was variable length related. using the TRIM() function fixed the issue. Thank you so much for pointing out the right fix! – Vinay Ashokkumar Oct 8 at 19:40

If I understand correctly this should give you what you want. Search each SENTENCE for TEXT if and when a match is found output and stop looking.

data SENTENCE;
   input sentence $80.;
   cards;
I live in New York
A bad day
A very good day
;;;;
   run;
data text;
   infile cards eof=eof;
   input text $80.;
   return;
 eof:
   call symputx('obs',_n_-1);
   cards;
New York
good day
very good day
;;;;
   run;
%put NOTE: &=obs;
data found;
   if _n_ eq 1 then do;
      array txt[&obs] $80 _temporary_;
      do i = 1 to dim(txt) while(not eof);
         set text end=eof;
         txt[i]=text;
         end;
      end;
   set sentence;
   do i = 1 to dim(txt);
      if find(sentence,txt[i],1,'T') then do;
         text=txt[i];
         output;
         leave;
         end;
      end;
   drop i;
   run;
proc print;
   run;
  • Thanks so much into looking into the issue! I tried this code out, and it does give me what I want. But the answer above was a much easier fix. But thank you once again for your efforts! – Vinay Ashokkumar Oct 8 at 19:42

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