9

I'm looking for ways to add variables (or LaTeX macros) to the YAML header or soon after such that they can be used in external .tex files that are a part of my (modularised) report.

My .rmd file

---
output:
  pdf_document:
    latex_engine: xelatex
    includes:
      before_body: some.tex
params:
  cat: "Felix"
  numb: 14
---

# chapter
Oh my \textbf{`r params$cat`}. 
$x = `r 2*params$numb`^2$

<!-- Trying again to get the parameter -->
\input{some.tex}

My some.tex file:

`r params\$cat`

Output

enter image description here

Hoped-for output

I want to be able to somehow pass the variables from the YAML header (or even just below it) to be used by LaTeX so that all important and regularly updated parameters can be viewed and changed in one place.

  • In some cases I could use just include the tex file as a child instead of \include, but if I wanted to use in in the preamble (in header)... – sindri_baldur Oct 8 '18 at 16:36
  • May I ask why you are sourcing external LaTeX files? If you want to make an R Markdown document from multiple files, you could look at using bookdown: bookdown.org/yihui/rmarkdown/books.html – Michael Harper Oct 11 '18 at 21:22
  • @MichaelHarper Thanks for pointer (will look into bookdown). It was an effort to keep things (a highly customized report) modularised and manageable. It would be a bit messy to have all the content of include>in_header (> 100 lines of code) in the original markdown document. – sindri_baldur Oct 12 '18 at 9:59
6
+100

If you are looking for something which perhaps is most in keeping with the R Markdown workflow, you can customise the template which is used to build the LaTeX output and add all the extra LaTeX code directly to this.

1. Copying Template

Firstly, we must make a copy of the template used by R Markdown. The following code will create this in your current working directory:

file.copy(system.file("rmd/latex/default-1.17.0.2.tex",
          package = "rmarkdown"), "template.tex")

2. Adding Variables

With our copy, we can define our own pandoc variables which will be inserted into the output document. This allows us to specify parameters in the YAML section of the document and they will be updated in the output format. It is exactly the same mechanism which allows us to add title, author, date and for them to be added to the output format.

I have added some code to the front matter of the document at lines 253-255. The exact location doesn't matter, but I also tend to put my customisations before the \begin{document} argument:

\usepackage{fancyhdr}
\pagestyle{fancy}
\fancyhead[LO, LE]{$params.value$}
\fancyhead[RO, RE]{$yourParam$}

3. Calling Template from R Markdown

We can reference the custom template to our R Markdown document as explained here. Here is my minimal example:

---
output:
  pdf_document:
    template: template.tex
params:
  value: Text
yourParam: "`r Sys.Date()`"
---

`r params$value`

The two parameters will be added to the output replacing the $params.value$ and $yourParam$, and result in the output below:

enter image description here

The example highlights how the YAML parameters don't have to be nested within the params argument, as specified in your original question. Having them specified within the parameters mainly has benefits if you want to build a parameterized report

Note: the approach of replacing variables using the pandoc notation $variable$ is only possible for the main template file defined under the template option. It won't work for any of the includes arguments or any other external LaTeX files. See here for more details.

  • Brilliant. If I am not misunderstanding (?!) then the Note explains it all you CAN reference Rmd YAML parameters but ONLY in the template. – sindri_baldur Oct 16 '18 at 13:00
  • 1
    Yes, you are correct. I should make this a little clearer. This approach is used extensively by the rticles package: github.com/rstudio/rticles . Let me know if you have any more queries about my answer :) – Michael Harper Oct 16 '18 at 18:14
  • 1
    While other answers are show a lot of ingenuity - I think this is how it is intended to be done. – sindri_baldur Oct 17 '18 at 10:40
  • Using rmd/latex/default-1.17.0.2.tex in the template argument seems to be different from when no template is stated: package geometry seems not to be loaded automatically anymore + fig.height and fig.height on chunks seem to be ignored. – sindri_baldur Oct 17 '18 at 11:17
  • 1
    You can see how the rmarkdown package selects the relevant template here. Looks like you are good using the original file. Something else must be going on, so maybe best opening another question. – Michael Harper Oct 17 '18 at 14:23
6

This comes only half-way. Still no file as header-input...

Maybe this answer will give someone else an idea to build on..

---
output:
  pdf_document:
    latex_engine: xelatex
params:
  cat: "Felix"
  numb: 14
header-includes:
- \usepackage{fancyhdr}
- \pagestyle{fancy}
- \fancyhead[CO,CE]{`r params$cat`}
---

# CHAPTER 1
Oh my \textbf{`r params$cat`}. 
$x = `r 2*params$numb`^2$

```{r child = 'some.tex'}
```

screenshot pdf

enter image description here

4

I'm sure you can code something together using lua-filters.

First come up with your own include-mechanism (since this needs to happen before variable-substitution, so you cannot use latex's \input), but e.g. this filter:

function Para (elem)
  if #elem.content == 1 and elem.content[1].t == "Image" then
    local img = elem.content[1]
    if img.classes[1] == "markdown" then
      local f = io.open(img.src, 'r')
      local blocks = pandoc.read(f:read('*a')).blocks
      f:close()
      return blocks
    end
  end
end

Then do the variable substitution with e.g. this filter:

local vars = {}

function get_vars (meta)
  for k, v in pairs(meta) do
    if v.t == 'MetaInlines' then
      vars["$" .. k .. "$"] = {table.unpack(v)}
    end
  end
end

function replace (el)
  if vars[el.text] then
    return pandoc.Span(vars[el.text])
  else
    return el
  end
end

return {{Meta = get_vars}, {Str = replace}}

This should then work like:

---
output:
  pdf_document:
    latex_engine: xelatex
    pandoc_args:
      - '--lua-filter=include.lua'
      - '--lua-filter=substitution.lua'
name: Samuel
---

Look, I can include files:

![](include.md){.markdown}

And in include.md:

Look, I can use variables: \$name\$
  • Nice. I think I will not use this for now but a great reference for others and perhaps my future self. – sindri_baldur Oct 16 '18 at 13:02
3

You can create a TeX or LaTeX macro in the YAML header, and use that in your some.tex file.

For example, put this in your main file:

---
output:
  pdf_document:
    latex_engine: xelatex
      includes:
        before_body: some.tex
header-includes:
- \def\thecat{`r params$cat`}
params:
  cat: "Felix"
  numb: 14
---


# chapter
Oh my \textbf{`r params$cat`}. 
$x = `r 2*params$numb`^2$

\input{some.tex}

and put this in some.tex:

\thecat

and things will display the way you want.

enter image description here

  • Great option but header-includes is already used to reference an external file in my case. – sindri_baldur Oct 16 '18 at 13:03
  • You can have multiple lines there. Just prefix each of them with the hyphen. See @Wimpel's answer. – user2554330 Oct 16 '18 at 13:41
1

Let me rephrase the question: The goal is to write a parametrized report. This report uses \input to embed a TEX file (e.g. some.tex). You are looking for a way to access the YAML parameters in some.tex.

One way to do this is to define LaTeX macros according to the YAML parameters, e.g. the YAML parameter cat: "Felix" becomes \newcommand{\cat}{Felix}. These TEX macros can then be used throughout the document. (In the main file, r params$cat would work as well, but as some.tex is not being knitted, here only \cat works.)

First, the R code is evaluated. It reads all YAML parameters and writes corresponding macros into myparams.tex.1 Via header-includes the generated file myparams.tex is included in the intermediate TEX file, which is finally being compiled to PDF.

Main RMD file:

---
output: pdf_document
header-includes: "\\input{myparams.tex}"
params:
  cat: "Felix"
  numb: 14
---

```{r, include = FALSE}
if (file.exists("myparams.tex")) {
  file.remove("myparams.tex") # CAUTION: this will DELETE any existing file "myparams.tex"
}
for (param in names(params)) {
  cat(sprintf("\\newcommand{\\%s}{%s}\n", param, params[param]), file = "myparams.tex", append = TRUE)
}
```

Oh my \cat. 
$x = 2 \cdot \numb^2$

Or alternatively: Oh my `r params$cat`. 

\input{some.tex}

some.tex:

Oh my \cat. % Here, `r params$cat` won't work.

Output:

Oh my Felix. x = 2 · 14²

Or alternatively: Oh my Felix.

Oh my Felix, again.

Contents of myparams.tex (dynamically generated):

\newcommand{\cat}{Felix}
\newcommand{\numb}{14}

1 It might be a good idea to use a unique prefix for all new LaTeX macros to avoid clashes between build-in LaTeX commands and YAML parameters with the same name.

  • This might to be what I am looking for. My report is modularised (to keep the main rmd clean), and some.tex is specialized fronmatter such as frontpage, table of cotenents and similar which will vary only very slightly between reports. Unfortunately I have less time to review all the solutions thoroughly than I had expected. – sindri_baldur Oct 16 '18 at 12:49
  • @snoram I updated my answer. Regarding time to review answers: Well, this is the burden of getting too many good answers ;-) (By the way, maybe you cold try to rephrase the question a little bit? At least I found it quite difficult to figure out what you actually need. In fact, this is why I didn't upvote the question yet: it's a good question but – at least to me – not very clear.) – CL. Oct 16 '18 at 15:18
  • Brilliant. Thanks so much! – sindri_baldur Oct 16 '18 at 15:21

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