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I am using GCC to build a bare metal application for an ARMv7 core that supports native divides. I have removed all library dependencies.

The GCC C compiler will sometimes reference __aeabi_uidiv(). Other times it will choose to use hardware divides (for unsigned integer division). I haven't been able to find a compiler flag that would force it to use hardware divides (instead of the __aeabi_* lib calls). Is anyone aware of such flag?

EDIT: I should clarify that I am appropriately using compiler flags -mtune=cortex-a7, and -march=armv7-a for an i.MX6ULL.

Example error:

uint32_t GenerateError(uint32_t num, uint32_t den) {
    return num / den; //generates undefined reference to __aeabi_uidiv
}
1

gcc is such a compiler.

uint8_t fun_u8 ( uint8_t a, uint8_t b )
{
    return(a/b);
}
uint16_t fun_u16 ( uint16_t a, uint16_t b )
{
    return(a/b);
}
uint32_t fun_u32 ( uint32_t a, uint32_t b )
{
    return(a/b);
}
uint64_t fun_u64 ( uint64_t a, uint64_t b )
{
    return(a/b);
}

int8_t fun_s8 ( int8_t a, int8_t b )
{
    return(a/b);
}
int16_t fun_s16 ( int16_t a, int16_t b )
{
    return(a/b);
}
int32_t fun_s32 ( int32_t a, int32_t b )
{
    return(a/b);
}
int64_t fun_s64 ( int64_t a, int64_t b )
{
    return(a/b);
}

build

arm-none-eabi-gcc -O2 -mcpu=cortex-a7 -c so.c -o so.o

result

00000000 <fun_u8>:
   0:   e730f110    udiv    r0, r0, r1
   4:   e12fff1e    bx  lr

00000008 <fun_u16>:
   8:   e730f110    udiv    r0, r0, r1
   c:   e12fff1e    bx  lr

00000010 <fun_u32>:
  10:   e730f110    udiv    r0, r0, r1
  14:   e12fff1e    bx  lr

00000018 <fun_u64>:
  18:   e92d4010    push    {r4, lr}
  1c:   ebfffffe    bl  0 <__aeabi_uldivmod>
  20:   e8bd8010    pop {r4, pc}

00000024 <fun_s8>:
  24:   e730f110    udiv    r0, r0, r1
  28:   e12fff1e    bx  lr

0000002c <fun_s16>:
  2c:   e710f110    sdiv    r0, r0, r1
  30:   e6bf0070    sxth    r0, r0
  34:   e12fff1e    bx  lr

00000038 <fun_s32>:
  38:   e710f110    sdiv    r0, r0, r1
  3c:   e12fff1e    bx  lr

00000040 <fun_s64>:
  40:   e92d4010    push    {r4, lr}
  44:   ebfffffe    bl  0 <__aeabi_ldivmod>
  48:   e8bd8010    pop {r4, pc}

From the arm documentation that is correct, there is hardware support for up to 32 bits / 32 bits. Above that you have to call a library (same goes for multiply) just to confirm expectations can add:

uint8_t fun_m8 ( uint32_t a, uint8_t b )
{
    return(a/b);
}
uint16_t fun_m16 ( uint32_t a, uint16_t b )
{
    return(a/b);
}
uint32_t fun_m32 ( uint32_t a, uint32_t b )
{
    return(a/b);
}

0000004c <fun_m8>:
  4c:   e730f110    udiv    r0, r0, r1
  50:   e6ef0070    uxtb    r0, r0
  54:   e12fff1e    bx  lr

00000058 <fun_m16>:
  58:   e730f110    udiv    r0, r0, r1
  5c:   e6ff0070    uxth    r0, r0
  60:   e12fff1e    bx  lr

00000064 <fun_m32>:
  64:   e730f110    udiv    r0, r0, r1
  68:   e12fff1e    bx  lr

no surprise there.

now that is arm mode often the compilers do thumb mode...

00000000 <fun_u8>:
   0:   fbb0 f0f1   udiv    r0, r0, r1
   4:   4770        bx  lr
   6:   bf00        nop

00000008 <fun_u16>:
   8:   fbb0 f0f1   udiv    r0, r0, r1
   c:   4770        bx  lr
   e:   bf00        nop

...

No change thumb2 on this platform supports a divide as well so its the larger than it supports requirements from the code being compiled that dictates if it can use the hardware instruction and for this test, gcc has chosen the desired hardware instruction rather than a gcclib call (for the ones it can).

If you want the compiler to use hardware instructions then instruct the compiler to use the instruction set you want. And keep your code within the capabilities of that instruction set. And use libraries that are likewise compiled for the instruction set of interest and that code stays within the limits of that instruction set. (and then see if the compiler uses the whole instruction set or at least the instructions of interest, if not then make your own library function for division in assembly and call it).

  • I guess I got lucky when I use cortex-a7 before I saw your edit. – old_timer Oct 8 '18 at 19:56
  • Thanks for your elaborate answer. I am still at a loss to understand what's going on behind the scenes here. – stephen Oct 8 '18 at 22:35
  • arm has a number of architectures post acorn, armv4, armv5...armv8 plus the cortex ms armv6m armv7m armv8m. other than armv8 these are all arm or thumb mode instructions but generally build on the past. there wasnt a divide originally so if you dont specify the core/architecture then you get the default when the compiler was built probably armv4t. so no divide so in order to do a divide gcc has its own internal libraries to cover what the instruction set doesnt have so uses the library when your C code has a divide. – old_timer Oct 8 '18 at 23:06
  • 1
    gcc's backend for arm is such that those folks chose to have all of these options back to the acorn days in a single backend, so you have to be pretty specific to get the instructions you are after, and/or you have to use assembly. – old_timer Oct 8 '18 at 23:10
  • 1
    I tried a 4.x.x a 5.x.x and 8.x.x all produced a divide instruction and not the library call. – old_timer Oct 9 '18 at 18:06
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What you're looking for is -march=armv7ve. That will target Armv7 with the hardware divide instruction. -mcpu=cortex-a15 and cortex-a7 target this architecture, so they'll generate the division instructions.

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