9

I have a Context struct:

struct Context {
    name: String,
    foo: i32,
}

impl Context {
    fn get_name(&self) -> &str {
        &self.name
    }
    fn set_foo(&mut self, num: i32) {
        self.foo = num
    }
}

fn main() {
    let mut context = Context {
        name: "MisterMV".to_owned(),
        foo: 42,
    };
    let name = context.get_name();
    if name == "foo" {
        context.set_foo(4);
    }
}

In a function, I need to first get the name of the context and update foo according to the name I have:

let name = context.get_name();
if (name == "foo") {
    context.set_foo(4);
}

The code won't compile because get_name() takes &self and set_foo() takes &mut self. In other words, I have an immutable borrow for get_name() but I also have mutable borrow for set_foo() within the same scope, which is against the rules of references.

At any given time, you can have either (but not both of) one mutable reference or any number of immutable references.

The error looks like:

error[E0502]: cannot borrow `context` as mutable because it is also borrowed as immutable
  --> src/main.rs:22:9
   |
20 |     let name = context.get_name();
   |                ------- immutable borrow occurs here
21 |     if name == "foo" {
22 |         context.set_foo(4);
   |         ^^^^^^^ mutable borrow occurs here
23 |     }
24 | }
   | - immutable borrow ends here

I'm wondering how can I workaround this situation?

3
  • 2
    Just as a note, I corrected your &String -> &str which is the borrow type for String. I'm not going to change your method names, but just know that in general the Rust style for getters is just the name of the variable rather than get_variable, so Context::name(&self) rather than Context::get_name(&self). NBD, just thought you may want to know.
    – Linear
    Commented Oct 8, 2018 at 20:38
  • @LinearZoetrope Thanks for the comment. Just curious is there any convention in Rust for the setter as well?
    – xxks-kkk
    Commented Oct 8, 2018 at 20:41
  • I think set_x is the standard, but I'm not sure. Personally I see x_mut which returns a mutable reference to the variable more often. (But obviously there are reasons you may want a setter and not to expose the raw variable).
    – Linear
    Commented Oct 8, 2018 at 20:42

3 Answers 3

14

This is a very broad question. The borrow checker is perhaps one of the most helpful features of Rust, but also the most prickly to deal with. Improvements to ergonomics are being made regularly, but sometimes situations like this happen.

There are several ways to handle this and I'll try and go over the pros and cons of each:

I. Convert to a form that only requires a limited borrow

As you learn Rust, you slowly learn when borrows expire and how quickly. In this case, for instance, you could convert to

if context.get_name() == "foo" {
    context.set_foo(4);
}

The borrow expires in the if statement. This usually is the way you want to go, and as features such as non-lexical lifetimes get better, this option gets more palatable. For instance, the way you've currently written it will work when NLLs are available due to this construction being properly detected as a "limited borrow"! Reformulation will sometimes fail for strange reasons (especially if a statement requires a conjunction of mutable and immutable calls), but should be your first choice.

II. Use scoping hacks with expressions-as-statements

let name_is_foo = {
    let name = context.get_name();
    name == "foo"
};

if name_is_foo {
    context.set_foo(4);
}

Rust's ability to use arbitrarily scoped statements that return values is incredibly powerful. If everything else fails, you can almost always use blocks to scope off your borrows, and only return a non-borrow flag value that you then use for your mutable calls. It's usually clearer to do method I. when available, but this one is useful, clear, and idiomatic Rust.

III. Create a "fused method" on the type

   impl Context {
      fn set_when_eq(&mut self, name: &str, new_foo: i32) {
          if self.name == name {
              self.foo = new_foo;
          }
      }
   }

There are, of course, endless variations of this. The most general being a function that takes an fn(&Self) -> Option<i32>, and sets based on the return value of that closure (None for "don't set", Some(val) to set that val).

Sometimes it's best to allow the struct to modify itself without doing the logic "outside". This is especially true of trees, but can lead to method explosion in the worst case, and of course isn't possible if operating on a foreign type you don't have control of.

IV. Clone

let name = context.get_name().clone();
if name == "foo" {
    context.set_foo(4);
}

Sometimes you have to do a quick clone. Avoid this when possible, but sometimes it's worth it to just throw in a clone() somewhere instead of spending 20 minutes trying to figure out how the hell to make your borrows work. Depends on your deadline, how expensive the clone is, how often you call that code, and so on.

For instance, arguably excessive cloning of PathBufs in CLI applications isn't horribly uncommon.

V. Use unsafe (NOT RECOMMENDED)

let name: *const str = context.get_name();
unsafe{
    if &*name == "foo" {
        context.set_foo(4);
    }
}

This should almost never be used, but may be necessary in extreme cases, or for performance in cases where you're essentially forced to clone (this can happen with graphs or some wonky data structures). Always, always try your hardest to avoid this, but keep it in your toolbox in case you absolutely have to.

Keep in mind that the compiler expects that the unsafe code you write upholds all the guarantees required of safe Rust code. An unsafe block indicates that while the compiler cannot verify the code is safe, the programmer has. If the programmer hasn't correctly verified it, the compiler is likely to produce code containing undefined behavior, which can lead to memory unsafety, crashes, etc., many of the things that Rust strives to avoid.

19
  • With non-lexical lifetimes, you won't need to convert the code to a form that only requires a limited borrow. The OP's code compiles without modification with NLLs enabled, since the minimum time a borrow is required is figured out automatically. Commented Oct 8, 2018 at 21:07
  • Rust can have some subtle bugs — No, Rust doesn't have these bugs — your code has undefined behavior and every guarantee is thrown out the window.
    – Shepmaster
    Commented Oct 8, 2018 at 21:20
  • @Shepmaster I mean, IMO it's semantics. The Rust team is trying to work on intuiting when it's not allowed to pass noalias which could be considered an ergonomics feature or a bug fix depending on perspective.
    – Linear
    Commented Oct 8, 2018 at 21:21
  • Maybe a better phrasing would be "the compiler can introduce unexpected subtle bugs into the compiled code"
    – Linear
    Commented Oct 8, 2018 at 21:23
  • 1
    My point is that if your code uses raw pointers to introduce mutable aliasing, that is your code's fault. There is no bug in the compiler, there is a bug in the code fed into the compiler. This code would erroneously claim "this code upholds the guarantees required of a valid Rust program, just trust me". The compiler does not introduce anything, it trusts the code as it is instructed.
    – Shepmaster
    Commented Oct 8, 2018 at 21:37
4

There is problably some answer that will already answer you, but there is a lot of case that trigger this error message so I will answer your specific case.

The easier solution is to use #![feature(nll)], this will compile without problem.

But you could fix the problem without nll, by using a simple match like this:

fn main() {
    let mut context = Context {
        name: "MisterMV".to_owned(),
        foo: 42,
    };
    match context.get_name() {
        "foo" => context.set_foo(4),
        // you could add more case as you like
        _ => (),
    }
}
3
  • 1
    I'm not sure I'd bring in feature gates for something this simple unless you're already working in nightly. Also, purely IMO, due to the _ => (), case this really is more of an if situation than a match one though that's a preference thing.
    – Linear
    Commented Oct 8, 2018 at 20:32
  • @LinearZoetrope Well, that really opinion-based, nll require nightly but that not "unsafe". I just said that it was the simplest solution (and also to said that the code itself is ok just that compiler without nll don't allow it). And yes if... only one test is require a if is more fast to write than a match. There is always a lot of solution to one problem. I didn't claim to have list all of them, primary because I don't know all of them ;)
    – Stargateur
    Commented Oct 8, 2018 at 20:39
  • @LinearZoetrope no feature gates needed, just use Beta and edition 2018. NLL is on by default there and will be the default come December and edition 2018.
    – Shepmaster
    Commented Oct 8, 2018 at 23:17
2

Prior to seeing @Stargateur's comment, I came up with the below which compiles fine, but does clone the name string:

struct Context {
    name: String,
    foo: i32,
}

impl Context {
    fn get_name(&self) -> String {
        self.name.clone()
    }
    fn set_foo(&mut self, num: i32) {
        self.foo = num
    }
}

fn main() {
    let mut context = Context {
        name: String::from("bill"),
        foo: 5,
    };

    let name = context.get_name();
    if name == "foo" {
        context.set_foo(4);
    }
    println!("Hello World!");
}

Working with @Stargateur's sample, it turns out there is a surprisingly simple solution to this particular problem - combine with the get_name with the if, e.g.

struct Context {
    name: String,
    foo: i32,
}

impl Context {
    fn get_name(&self) -> &String {
        &self.name
    }
    fn set_foo(&mut self, num: i32) {
        self.foo = num
    }
}

fn main() {
    let mut context = Context {
        name: "MisterMV".to_owned(),
        foo: 42,
    };
    if context.get_name() == "foo" {
        context.set_foo(4);
    }
}

I believe that this is because the variable for the get_name part has its lifetime clearly delineated, whereas when the name variable was separate, it essentially could have its value suddenly changed without an explicit mutation.

1
  • @LinearZoetrope beat me to it by a minute. Looks like a much better answer, however.
    – Jarak
    Commented Oct 8, 2018 at 20:28

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