2

I was looking into SslSplit code. And I faced some unfamiliar, strange function declarations in opts.h file. Definition of those functions are quite straightforward but I could use some help about declarations. Here it is:

opts.h:

char *proxyspec_str(proxyspec_t *) NONNULL(1) MALLOC;
void opts_set_crl(opts_t *, const char *) NONNULL(1,2);

opts.c:

void
opts_set_crl(opts_t *opts, const char *optarg)
{
    if (opts->crlurl)
        free(opts->crlurl);
    opts->crlurl = strdup(optarg);
    log_dbg_printf("CRL: %s\n", opts->crlurl);
}

char *
proxyspec_str(proxyspec_t *spec)
{
    char *s;
    char *lhbuf, *lpbuf;
    char *cbuf = NULL;

    // Some code..

    return s;
}

attrib.h:

#define WUNRES          __attribute__((warn_unused_result))
#define MALLOC          __attribute__((malloc)) WUNRES
#define NONNULL(...)    __attribute__((nonnull(__VA_ARGS__)))

My question is, what are the meanings of NONNULL and MALLOC at the end of the function declarations?

6
  • 3
    Well, just search the documentation of GCC: gcc.gnu.org/onlinedocs/gcc-4.7.2/gcc/Function-Attributes.html – Jack Oct 8 '18 at 22:23
  • They're preprocessor symbols. Do you know what preprocessor symbols are? If not, please consider reading a book, as most books cover the preprocessor... and C shouldn't be learnt without some kind of guidance. – autistic Oct 8 '18 at 22:43
  • @autistic any particular motivation on removing the C tag from this question? – sidyll Oct 8 '18 at 22:56
  • 1
    @sidyll I added it back – Eziz Durdyyev Oct 8 '18 at 22:59
  • 2
    @autistic The question is clearly about C to my eyes. Function attributes are also not exclusively GCC specific, other compilers feature them. Just because it's not in the language standard, doesn't mean it has nothing to do with the language itself. Moreover, the question targets a C code the questioner didn't understand. Anyway, you're welcome to bring this discussion to meta to check this possibility of interpretation. I'd be happy to correct myself in case I interpreted it wrong. – sidyll Oct 9 '18 at 1:49
3

As you pointed out yourself, NONNULL and MALLOC are just macros. Their replacement starts with __attribute__ which is a compiler extension keyword, used to define attributes in a function.

The __VA_ARGS__ is the replacement for the variable number of arguments in a macro (declared with the ...). So this declaration:

void opts_set_crl(opts_t *, const char *) NONNULL(1,2);

Is transformed by the preprocessor (before the compiler sees it) into:

void opts_set_crl(opts_t *, const char *) __attribute__((nonnull(1,2)));

What this effectively does is preventing the first and second parameters of being NULL. If you check the documentation of a compiler which supports this extension, such as gcc or clang you will find the complete description.

The other attribute, malloc, from the GNU manual:

This tells the compiler that a function is malloc-like, i.e., that the pointer P returned by the function cannot alias any other pointer valid when the function returns, and moreover no pointers to valid objects occur in any storage addressed by P.

Using this attribute can improve optimization. Functions like malloc and calloc have this property because they return a pointer to uninitialized or zeroed-out storage. However, functions like realloc do not have this property, as they can return a pointer to storage containing pointers.

5
  • "the memory has undefined content. ... Standard functions with this property include malloc and calloc" - wait, what? The content of the memory returned by calloc is completely defined. There has to be a doc error here. – user2357112 supports Monica Oct 8 '18 at 22:40
  • Looks like later docs say something different (and more sensible): "This tells the compiler that a function is malloc-like, i.e., that the pointer P returned by the function cannot alias any other pointer valid when the function returns, and moreover no pointers to valid objects occur in any storage addressed by P." – user2357112 supports Monica Oct 8 '18 at 22:43
  • @user2357112 Thank you for noticing this and updating it. I grabbed the first documentation search result without realizing it was so outdated. – sidyll Oct 8 '18 at 22:54
  • I double-checked to see C17/annex J.5 (common extensions) doesn't even seem to make a mention... so it doesn't even seem to be recognised as a common extension... I think there are probably only two implementations that support this... – autistic Oct 9 '18 at 9:49
  • 1
    As the author of the code in question I may just add to this fine answer that I introduced the macros so that the __attribute__ decorators can be removed on compilers that do not support them. Also, I find the __attribute__ syntax to be unreadable and hard to type. – Daniel Roethlisberger Nov 8 '18 at 10:06

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.