I have the following dataset:

* Example generated by -dataex-. To install: ssc install dataex
clear
input float(MA_234_AAF_US AL_87665_ACH_USA TX_3_GH_US LA_689_KLO_US KY_3435_Z_USA)
  9.96567 10.559998 12.935112 13.142867   9.35608
 9.758375     9.856 10.002945  8.090142 10.313352
11.594983  9.274136 12.486753  6.661111 10.529528
10.354564  9.893115 10.625778 13.265523  7.405652
  12.7978  10.76272 11.527348 10.112844  11.64973
 10.63846 11.040354  8.569465  8.781206 11.448466
 9.254233 13.808356 10.817062  9.545164  8.759109
  11.8417  10.15155  12.72436 11.102546 11.506034
 9.864883  9.864952  14.45111  10.12562  9.753519
 9.965327 11.517155  9.910269  8.988406 11.359774
end

I would like to change the order of the text in the variable names like this:

US_MA_AAF_234   USA_AL_ACH_87665   US_TX_GH_3   US_LA_KLO_689   USA_KY_Z_3435

I have tried the code provided in the answers in this question:

Remove middle character from variable names

However, I could not make it work.

up vote 6 down vote accepted

All three approaches from the other question can work.

The only challenging bit here is that different parts of the variable names have different length.

As such, the best approach is probably the use of the built-in command rename:

rename (*_#_*_*) (*[4]_*[1]_*[3]_#[2])

+-------------------------------------------------------------------------------+
| US_MA_AAF_234   USA_AL_ACH_87665   US_TX_GH_3   US_LA_KLO_689   USA_KY_Z_3435 |
+-------------------------------------------------------------------------------+

You need to study carefully the use of specifiers in help rename group.

Here is an alternative approach. It's inferior to using rename in one line, which addresses the purpose well. Scrutiny will show the necessary correspondence with that approach. It hinges on the names being elements separated by underscores, which are removed and then reinserted.

clear
input float(MA_234_AAF_US AL_87665_ACH_USA TX_3_GH_US LA_689_KLO_US KY_3435_Z_USA)
  9.96567 10.559998 12.935112 13.142867   9.35608
end

foreach name of var * { 
    local new = subinstr("`name'", "_", " ", .) 
    tokenize `new' 
    rename `name' `4'_`1'_`3'_`2' 
}

describe, fullnames 

Contains data
  obs:             1                          
 vars:             5                          
 size:            20                          
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
              storage   display    value
variable name   type    format     label      variable label
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
US_MA_AAF_234   float   %9.0g                 
USA_AL_ACH_87665
                float   %9.0g                 
US_TX_GH_3      float   %9.0g                 
US_LA_KLO_689   float   %9.0g                 
USA_KY_Z_3435   float   %9.0g                 
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

EDIT As @Pearly Spencer points out, the statements within the loop

    local new = subinstr("`name'", "_", " ", .) 
    tokenize `new' 
    rename `name' `4'_`1'_`3'_`2' 

could be replaced by

    tokenize `name', parse(_)
    rename `name' `7'_`1'_`5'_`3' 

where the difference is that the underscores will get placed in local macros 2 4 6.

  • Interesting solution. Can you explain why this line works?>local new = subinstr("`name'", "_", " ", .) – Yan Song 2 days ago
  • Try on a local macro containing say a_b_c_d. – Nick Cox 2 days ago
  • Is there a note explaining why the subinstr works the way you wrote. I checked the manual of subinstr. It did not have this. – Yan Song 2 days ago
  • The function replaces one string by another. This is documented and what people need to show. – Nick Cox 2 days ago

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