77

Is there a way to detect or get a notification when user changes the page in a paging-enabled UIScrollView?

17

Implement the delegate of UIScrollView. This method is what you are looking for.

- (void)scrollViewDidScroll:(UIScrollView *)scrollView
  • 26
    detecting pagechange in this method is not efficient, because the code will be run everytime the user swipe. So it is better to do it in scrollViewDidEndDecelerating method. – jianpx Jul 10 '13 at 16:34
  • 2
    @jianpx - This solution has a problem: if user stops scrolling exactly at the end of the page (this is quite possible), this function won't be called! – Maciej Kozieł Jun 13 '14 at 14:24
  • @MaciejKozieł did you find a solution for that issue? – Zorayr Dec 8 '16 at 21:59
  • @Zorayr Yes, I stopped worrying about it ;) I can think of few alternatives (and original answer, while less efficient, is one of them). I needed it for page indicator, and this edge case isn't app breaking problem; it will refresh as soon as any deceleration occurs. – Maciej Kozieł Dec 8 '16 at 22:35
  • @jianpx you solved a very specific issue for me with that comment. Thank you. – StoriKnow Sep 16 '18 at 0:50
192

Use this to detect which page is currently being shown and perform some action on page change:

- (void)scrollViewDidScroll:(UIScrollView *)scrollView {
    static NSInteger previousPage = 0;
    CGFloat pageWidth = scrollView.frame.size.width;
    float fractionalPage = scrollView.contentOffset.x / pageWidth;
    NSInteger page = lround(fractionalPage);
    if (previousPage != page) {
        // Page has changed, do your thing!
        // ...
        // Finally, update previous page
        previousPage = page;
    }
}

If it's acceptable for you to only react to the page change once the scrolling has completely stopped, then it would be best to do the above inside the scrollViewDidEndDecelerating: delegate method instead of the scrollViewDidScroll: method.

  • 4
    I know this is old but maybe it'll help, using this method can return negative numbers and also pages that are out of the bounds of the scrollview. If you are using the page to access an array this can obviously cause problems and therefore checks may be needed on the page. – ScottPetit Apr 12 '12 at 22:52
  • 2
    writing the above code inside this would be much better... - (void)scrollViewDidEndDecelerating:(UIScrollView *)scrollView – Nishant Mar 27 '13 at 17:45
  • 1
    I don't understand why this answer is being up voted. Using the above will be called on every movment of the scroll view. There's really no need for that. Using scrollViewDidEndDecelerating is a better solution but not a complete one. I've added a solution of my own that solved it completely for me. – Segev Dec 16 '13 at 12:55
  • 1
    It depends on when they want to react to a page change. If they only need to know when the scrollview has stopped scrolling then doing it after decelerating is best. Otherwise, the did scroll method is best. – Michael Waterfall Dec 16 '13 at 17:21
  • @segev - scrollViewDidEndDecelerating does not work. – Fattie Nov 26 at 17:37
64

In paging enabled scroll view you can use scrollViewDidEndDecelerating to know when the view is settled on a page (might be the same page).

- (void)scrollViewDidEndDecelerating:(UIScrollView *)scrollView

scrollViewDidScroll gets called on every movement. And in context of paging enabled view can be used to find when it is scrolled enough to move to next page (if dragging is stopped at that point).

  • 1
    This solution has a problem: if user stops scrolling exactly at the end of the page (this is quite possible), this function won't be called! – Maciej Kozieł Jun 13 '14 at 14:23
  • @MaciejKozieł A better solution is giving in another answer by me – Segev Sep 17 '14 at 12:49
  • @Sagev How does it solve that case where - (void)scrollViewWillBeginDecelerating:(UIScrollView *)scrollView and - (void)scrollViewDidEndDecelerating:(UIScrollView *)scrollView are not called at all? – Maciej Kozieł Sep 17 '14 at 13:38
36
+50

How about combining two methods of UIScrollViewDelegate?

In scrollViewDidEndDragging(_:willDecelerate:), if it stops right away, we do the page calculation; if it is decelerating, we let it go and it will be caught by scrollViewDidEndDecelerating(_:).

The code is tested with XCode version 7.1.1, Swift version 2.1

class ViewController: UIViewController, UIScrollViewDelegate {

  // MARK: UIScrollViewDelegate
  func scrollViewDidEndDragging(scrollView: UIScrollView, willDecelerate decelerate: Bool) {
    if decelerate == false {
        let currentPage = scrollView.currentPage
        // Do something with your page update
        print("scrollViewDidEndDragging: \(currentPage)")
    }
  }

  func scrollViewDidEndDecelerating(scrollView: UIScrollView) {
    let currentPage = scrollView.currentPage
    // Do something with your page update
    print("scrollViewDidEndDecelerating: \(currentPage)")
  }

}

extension UIScrollView {
   var currentPage: Int {
      return Int((self.contentOffset.x+ (0.5*self.frame.size.width))/self.frame.width)+1
   }
}
  • the only correct solution – Fattie Nov 26 at 17:55
22

First result on google for page detection so I had to answer this with a better solution in my opinion. (even if this question was asked 2 and a half years ago.)

I'd prefer not to call scrollViewDidScroll just to track the page number. Thats an overkill for something simple as that. Using scrollViewDidEndDecelerating does work and stops on a page change BUT (and it's a big but) if the user will swipe on the screen twice a bit faster than normal scrollViewDidEndDecelerating will be called only once. You can easily go from page #1 to page #3 without processing page #2.

This solved it completely for me:

- (void)scrollViewWillBeginDecelerating:(UIScrollView *)scrollView
{
    scrollView.userInteractionEnabled = NO;
}

- (void)scrollViewDidEndDecelerating:(UIScrollView *)scrollView
{
    //Run your code on the current page
    scrollView.userInteractionEnabled = YES;
}

That way the user can only swipe one page at a time without the risk described above.

  • You are totally right. This is a good solution for infinite scroll. – fabrizotus Dec 28 '13 at 4:58
  • 2
    If the user tries to swipe multiple pages in quick succession, it won't behave as expected. However, while this isn't perfect, it's a quick fix for me until I have more time to devote to a better solution. – Pier-Luc Gendreau Feb 4 '14 at 1:29
  • @Pier-LucGendreau As fas as my tests go there is no such scenario. The user can't swipe twice. Put a break point inside scrollViewWillBeginDecelerating and you will learn that the mil second the user lifts his finger from the first swipe you'll reach that break point. – Segev Feb 4 '14 at 6:01
  • 2
    I know, but if you swipe again before the first swipe animation finishes, that second swipe is lost. – Pier-Luc Gendreau Feb 4 '14 at 22:24
  • 1
    Thank you, kind sir, for taking responsibility in improving an old answer. – TigerCoding Feb 25 '15 at 21:28
11

Swift 4

I found the best way to do this is by using scrollViewWillEndDragging(_:withVelocity:targetContentOffset:). It lets you predict if paging will occur as soon as you lift your finger off the screen. This example is for paging horizontally.

Remember to the assign the scrollView.delegate to the object that adopts UIScrollViewDelegate and implements this method.

var previousPageXOffset: CGFloat = 0.0

func scrollViewWillEndDragging(_ scrollView: UIScrollView, withVelocity velocity: CGPoint, targetContentOffset: UnsafeMutablePointer<CGPoint>) {

    let targetOffset = targetContentOffset.pointee

    if targetOffset.x == previousPageXOffset {
        // page will not change
    } else if targetOffset.x < previousPageXOffset {
        // scroll view will page left
    } else if targetOffset.x > previousPageXOffset {
        // scroll view will page right
    }

    previousPageXOffset = targetOffset.x
    // If you want to track the index of the page you are on just just divide the previousPageXOffset by the scrollView width.
    // let index = Int(previousPageXOffset / scrollView.frame.width)


}
  • This works beautifully, thank you Doug. – Saik Jul 21 '18 at 19:04
  • 2
    That's the correct answer, the other methods are called even if a scrollView don't scroll sufficiently to trigger the paging change. – Romulo BM Dec 28 '18 at 12:31
1

Here is the swift solution for this.

Make two properties currentPage and previousPage in the class where you are implementing your code and initialize them to 0.

Now update currentPage from scrollViewDidEndDragging(:willDecelerate:) and scrollViewDidEndDecelerating(:scrollView:).

And then update previousPage in scrollViewDidEndScrollingAnimation(_:scrollView:)

    //Class Properties
    var currentPage = 0
    var previousPage = 0

func scrollViewDidEndDragging(scrollView: UIScrollView, willDecelerate decelerate: Bool) {
        updatePage(scrollView)
        return
    }

 func scrollViewDidEndDecelerating(scrollView: UIScrollView){
        updatePage(scrollView)
        return
    }


 func updatePage(scrollView: UIScrollView) {
        let pageWidth:CGFloat = scrollView.frame.width
        let current:CGFloat = floor((scrollView.contentOffset.x-pageWidth/2)/pageWidth)+1
        currentPage = Int(current)

        if currentPage == 0 {
              // DO SOMETHING
        }
        else if currentPage == 1{
              // DO SOMETHING

        }
    }

func scrollViewDidEndScrollingAnimation(scrollView: UIScrollView) {
     if previousPage != currentPage {
          previousPage = currentPage
          if currentPage == 0 {
              //DO SOMETHING
             }else if currentPage == 1 {
               // DO SOMETHING
           }
       }
   }
0

For Swift

static var previousPage: Int = 0
func scrollViewDidScroll(_ scrollView: UIScrollView){
let pageWidth: CGFloat = scrollView.frame.width
let fractionalPage: CGFloat = scrollView.contentOffset.x / pageWidth
let page = lround(Double(fractionalPage))
if page != previousPage
{
  print(page)
  // page changed
}
}
0

Cut and paste for 2019

It's not so easy to do this:

var quantumPage: Int = -100 {   // the UNIQUELY LANDED ON, NEVER REPEATING page
    didSet {
        print(">>>>>> QUANTUM PAGE IS \(quantumPage)")
        pageHasActuallyChanged() // your function
    }
}

private var possibleQuantumPage: Int = -100 {
    didSet {
        if oldValue != possibleQuantumPage {
            quantumPage = possibleQuantumPage
        }
    }
}

public func scrollViewDidEndDragging(
                    _ scrollView: UIScrollView, willDecelerate decelerate: Bool) {
    if decelerate == false {
        possibleQuantumPage = currentPageEvenIfInBetween
    }
}

public func scrollViewDidEndDecelerating(_ scrollView: UIScrollView) {
    possibleQuantumPage = currentPageEvenIfInBetween
}

var currentPageEvenIfInBetween: Int {
   return Int((self.contentOffset.x + (0.5 * self.frame.width)) / self.frame.width)
}

Works perfectly.

pageHasActuallyChanged will only be called when the user changes pages in what humans would consider "changing pages".

This is difficult to initialize at bringup time, and will depend on how you are using the paged system.

In any paged system you will very likely have something like "scrollToViewAtIndex..."

open func scrollToViewAtIndexForBringup(_ index: Int) {
    if index > -1 && index < childViews.count {

        let w = self.frame.size.width
        let h = self.frame.size.height

        let frame = CGRect(x: CGFloat(index)*w, y: 0, width: w, height: h)
        scrollRectToVisible(frame, animated: false) // NOTE THE FALSE

        // AND IMPORTANTLY:
        possibleQuantumPage = currentPageEvenIfInBetween
    }
}

So, if the user opens the "book" at page 17, in your boss class you'd be calling that function to set it to "17" on bringup. In such an example, you'd just have to remember that you must set initially our possibleQuantumPage value in any such bringup functions; there's no really generalized way to handle the starting situation. After all you may, just for example, want to "quickly scroll" to the bringup page, and, who knows what that "means" in a quantumPage situation, so, simply initialize your quantum page system carefully based on your situation.

In any event, just copy and paste the five functions at the top to get perfect quantum paging.

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