0

When I run the python code below, the results are 0, 5

#file name main1.py
def getZ(x,y):
    global Z
    Z=x*x+y*y
    return Z

global X,Y,Z

X=1 
Y=2
Z=0
print(Z)
getZ(X,Y);
print(Z)

but when I run the file below

#file name main2.py
import getZ

global X,Y,Z
X=1     
Y=2
Z=0
print(Z)
getZ.getZ(X,Y);
print(Z)

with new user define function ,

#file name getZ.py
def getZ(x,y):
    global Z
    Z=x*x+y*y
    return Z

the results are 0, 0

I cannot understand this situation.

Can anyone give me a help?

Thank you for your advice.

  • 1
    global Z only gives the function access to the global variable Z from that file. It knows nothing of the Z in the file(s) it gets imported into. To have a Z which is truly global across all files, you'd need to from ... import Z in every file where you want to use it - except that this (having variables you can change the value of across all files) is really bad design, which is why Python makes it hard for you to do this. – Robin Zigmond Oct 9 '18 at 15:00
  • 1
    global doesn't do anything at the global scope; it's only use is to change function-local variables to global variables in the function. – chepner Oct 9 '18 at 15:02
2

Python doesn't have true globals, only module-level globals. The Z that getZ accesses is getZ.Z, not __main__.Z which you set in main2.py.

This would work:

#file name main2.py
import getZ

X=1     
Y=2
getZ.Z = 0  # Set the value of the variable `getZ.getZ` looks for.
print(getZ.Z)
getZ.getZ(X, Y)
print(getZ.Z)
| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    This would work indeed, but rebinding globals is still evil. – bruno desthuilliers Oct 9 '18 at 15:06
  • It depends on how the module is defined. It's perfectly reasonable to allow, even encourage, the value of a module-level global to be changed if the functions that use it are designed to expect it. It's not that different from defining a function to take a parameter to configure its behavior. – chepner Oct 9 '18 at 15:12
  • "Golden rules" are meant to be broken indeed but only once you fully understand the implications... and from experience there are very very few cases where rebinding a global makes for better code (better = more robust and easier to understand) – bruno desthuilliers Oct 9 '18 at 15:41
1

Python "globals" are only globals to the module, there's no process-wide globals , so getZ.getZ() sets getZ.Z, not main2.Z. This is by design, and this is a GoodThing(tm), process-wide globals are both pure evil and totally useless. FWIW, even rebinding module globals is evil and should be avoided as much as possible (globals should be considered as constants if you value your mental sanity).

| improve this answer | |

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