-4

I have the below line in a file:

~Test1~, ~Test2~,,,, ~Test3, Test4~, ~Test5~

This should be interpreted 7 columns as the comma between ~Test3 and Test4~ is data, not a delimiter.

I want to have a dynamic script in unix that will check the number of columns (7) based on the field delimiter, in this case ',' and to ignore that in one column exists a text with comma. The separator can be replaced during the process.

I think a solution in sed would be to change the separator from comma into a semicolon ';' which would make the output: ~Test1~; ~Test2~;;;;~Test3, Test4~; ~Test5

closed as unclear what you're asking by tripleee, dawg, RavinderSingh13, Ed Morton, gnat Oct 10 '18 at 8:15

Please clarify your specific problem or add additional details to highlight exactly what you need. As it's currently written, it’s hard to tell exactly what you're asking. See the How to Ask page for help clarifying this question. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

  • Please clarify what is a 'column' or 'row' in your case. Provide example input, desired output, and what you have tried. – dawg Oct 9 '18 at 18:14
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    @dawg My interpretation: It's CSV with ~ as the quoting character (for some reason). OP wants to validate the number of columns using awk (for some reason). – melpomene Oct 9 '18 at 18:18
  • @melpomene: I agree mostly, but the example has 7 rows, not 7 columns. Enough ambiguity to make answering a waste of time – dawg Oct 9 '18 at 18:30
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    @dawg That's just for illustration, showing explicitly what the 7 columns are. – melpomene Oct 9 '18 at 18:35
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    This is a good candidate for using a proper CSV parser, but you need to have only comma as the field separator, not "comma space" – glenn jackman Oct 9 '18 at 18:50
1

IF you had consistent csv, without a space, you can use Ed Morton's FPAT approach with GNU awk:

$ echo '~Test1~,~Test2~,,,,~Test3, Test4~,~Test5~' | 
        gawk -v FPAT='[^,]*|~[^~]+~' '{for (i=1; i<=NF;i++) print i, "<" $i ">"}'
1 <~Test1~>
2 <~Test2~>
3 <>
4 <>
5 <>
6 <~Test3, Test4~>
7 <~Test5~>

For your example, you can modify that regex to take into account the inconsistent spacing by actually capturing then removing the space and the comma:

$ echo "~Test1~, ~Test2~,,,, ~Test3, Test4~, ~Test5~" | 
    gawk -v FPAT="([ ]?~[^~]+~,?)|([^,]*,)" '{for (i=1; i<=NF;i++) {sub(/,$/,"", $i); sub(/^ /,"",$i); print i, "<" $i ">"}}'
1 <~Test1~>
2 <~Test2~>
3 <>
4 <>
5 <>
6 <~Test3, Test4~>
7 <~Test5~>

Since you example does have inconsistent spacing between commas, you could use Ruby's csv parser:

$ ruby -e 'require "csv"
         options={:col_sep=>", ", :quote_char=>"~"}
         CSV.parse($<, options){ |r| p r}' <<<  '~Test1~, ~Test2~, , , , ~Test3, Test4~, ~Test5~'
["Test1", "Test2", nil, nil, nil, "Test3, Test4", "Test5"]

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