Assume I have a list_a variable with all possible sports played in the world:

football 
tennis 
hockey
cricket
croquet
racquetball
cricket
pingpong
squash
rugby
swimming
swimming
soccer 

Also assume I have another variable list_b of only three sports:

cricket
hockey
swimming

I want to create a new variable Cont, which will equal 1 when the sports in list_a are found in list_b, and equal to 0 when the sport is not in list_b.

This is what variable Cont would look like:

0
0
1
1
0
0
1
0
0
0
1 
1
0

Will the following work:

gen Cont = 0
replace Cont = 1 if  (strmatch( list_a, ( list_b)))

EDIT:

Suppose list_a also contained hoccckey (which is a typo) but I still want it to get counted.

Is there a way to do that?

  • As @PearlySpencer has explained gen cont = strmatch(list_a, list_b) (which is your code simplified down) won't work because list_a will only be compared with list_b in the same observation. Nothing makes that syntax produce a comparison across all possible pairs of values. Experiment should have shown you that. – Nick Cox Oct 10 at 9:10
up vote 2 down vote accepted

The answer is no because your approach will compare the values of the two variables in each observation. Instead, you need to compare the value at each row of list_a, with all values of variable list_b.

Using your toy example:

clear

input strL(list_a list_b)
football cricket
tennis hockey 
hockey swimming 
cricket 
croquet 
racquetball 
cricket
pingpong
squash
rugby
swimming 
swimming
soccer
end

The following illustrates the philosophy:

local obs = _N
generate Cont = 0

forvalues i = 1 / `obs' {
    forvalues j = 1 / `obs' {
        replace Cont = 1 if list_a[`i'] == list_b[`j'] in `i'
    }
}

list
     +-------------------------------+
     |      list_a     list_b   Cont |
     |-------------------------------|
  1. |    football    cricket      0 |
  2. |      tennis     hockey      0 |
  3. |      hockey   swimming      1 |
  4. |     cricket                 1 |
  5. |     croquet                 0 |
     |-------------------------------|
  6. | racquetball                 0 |
  7. |     cricket                 1 |
  8. |    pingpong                 0 |
  9. |      squash                 0 |
 10. |       rugby                 0 |
     |-------------------------------|
 11. |    swimming                 1 |
 12. |    swimming                 1 |
 13. |      soccer                 0 |
     +-------------------------------+

EDIT:

If you have certain typos that you additionally want to take into account, you can combine my solution with @NickCox's. In the above loop use instead:

replace Cont = 1 if inlist(list_a, "hoccckey") | list_a[`i'] == list_b[`j'] in `i'
  • A refinement on this would be to loop over the distinct values of each variable to avoid repeating the same test. There is an overhead in finding those distinct values. – Nick Cox Oct 10 at 7:37
  • Suppose list_a also contained hoccckey (which is a typo) but I still want it to get counted. Is there a way to do that? Perhaps a matchit? – Jyothsna Harithsa Oct 10 at 17:11
  • @JyothsnaHarithsa see my revised answer but in the future please start a new question. – Pearly Spencer Oct 10 at 18:34
  • what if we did not know what the exact typo is in a large dataset? Suppose I want to set Cont = 1 if the entry in list_a is an 80% match to the entry in list_b? – Jyothsna Harithsa Oct 10 at 18:35
  • 2
    This is an entirely different question. You need something like fuzzy matching which is really difficult. – Pearly Spencer Oct 10 at 18:35

There is a simple technique that works fine for your toy example:

clear 
input strL list_a 
football 
tennis 
hockey
cricket
croquet
racquetball
cricket
pingpong
squash
rugby
swimming
swimming
soccer 
end 

gen wanted = inlist(list_a, "cricket", "hockey", "swimming") 

list, sepby(wanted)

     +----------------------+
     |      list_a   wanted |
     |----------------------|
  1. |    football        0 |
  2. |      tennis        0 |
     |----------------------|
  3. |      hockey        1 |
  4. |     cricket        1 |
     |----------------------|
  5. |     croquet        0 |
  6. | racquetball        0 |
     |----------------------|
  7. |     cricket        1 |
     |----------------------|
  8. |    pingpong        0 |
  9. |      squash        0 |
 10. |       rugby        0 |
     |----------------------|
 11. |    swimming        1 |
 12. |    swimming        1 |
     |----------------------|
 13. |      soccer        0 |
     +----------------------+

If you had many more values, you could loop over the distinct values sought, using levelsof if they are in a second variable, or put the candidates in a separate dataset and merge as explained in this FAQ.

All these techniques depend on exact equality of strings, so watch out for variations between upper and lower case, leading and trailing spaces and inconsistencies in spelling.

  • Suppose list_a also contained hoccckey (which is a typo) but I still want it to get counted. Is there a way to do that? Perhaps a matchit? – Jyothsna Harithsa Oct 10 at 18:06
  • 2
    You need different code. @Pearly Spencer is spot on here. You can enlarge the list of acceptable matches but if you relax away from exact matching, it's a different ball game. – Nick Cox Oct 10 at 18:51

Your Answer

 

By clicking "Post Your Answer", you acknowledge that you have read our updated terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy, and that your continued use of the website is subject to these policies.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.