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I do not want to encode the password because then it is as simple as passing that encoded text through a decoder to return the original value. Instead, I want my Python program to pass its windows credentials for whoever is running the script.

Is this possible?

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    It's not clear what you're trying to do. What service are you trying to access that requires a password? – Jonathon Reinhart Oct 11 '18 at 5:32
  • The script I wrote will execute a query on an oracle database using the cx_Oracle package which requires user authentication. In our company, if you have read access to the db, you can authenticate with your windows network ID. I would like to share this script with other folks on my team, so they can schedule tasks to run these queries and pull the data they need, but I'd prefer they didn't store their passwords in a file or need to enter it manually as that would eliminate the possibility of scheduling the task. – Jeff Bagley Oct 12 '18 at 16:31
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    You should consider using kerberos authentication rather than username/password. It's much more secure. See stackoverflow.com/q/44020986/119527. Ask your Oracle database administrator if it supports kerberos auth. – Jonathon Reinhart Oct 13 '18 at 4:07
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I do not want to encode the password because then it is as simple as passing that encoded text through a decoder to return the original value.

Assuming an attacker had access to your encoding method, this is technically correct, but not really relevant. You don't encode (or encrypt) passwords for storage, you hash them, and a hash is not reversible; while there are ways to brute force a hash, a good hashing algorithm (see bcrypt) will produce hashes that are infeasible to crack.

If this is the sole reason for wanting some sort of Windows authentication integration, I would say it's unnecessary. All you need to do is brush up on password hashing.

Instead, I want my Python program to pass its windows credentials for whoever is running the script.

os.getlogin() should get the user currently logged in. If you mean you actually want to provide a user's username and password, you'll need to prompt them for that and pass it on to whatever service you're accessing, as no operating system is going to hand your script a user's password (which almost certainly isn't stored a human-readable format anyway).

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