1

I created a Class called Parameter, which can hold a generic value as an object. The parameter object also has a Unit object associated with it, that can provide information about the unit of measure for conversion purposes elsewhere in my program. What I want to do is be able to directly assign common datatype values to the class and have it use an indirect cast to assign the correct internal parameter. Here's a simplified structure of the class as an example:

/// <summary>
/// Class represnting a single parameter, which contains a value and a unit of measure
/// </summary>
public class Parameter
{
    #region Operators

    /// <summary>
    /// Conversion from Parameter to double
    /// </summary>
    static public implicit operator double(Parameter p)
    {
        return Convert.ToDouble(p.BaseValue);
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Conversion from Parameter to int
    /// </summary>
    static public implicit operator int(Parameter p)
    {
        return Convert.ToInt32(p.BaseValue);
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Conversion from Parameter to bool
    /// </summary>
    static public implicit operator bool(Parameter p)
    {
        return (bool)p.BaseValue;
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Conversion from Parameter to DateTime
    /// </summary>
    static public implicit operator DateTime(Parameter p)
    {
        return (DateTime)p.BaseValue;
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Conversion from Parameter to TimeSpan
    /// </summary>
    static public implicit operator TimeSpan(Parameter p)
    {
        return (TimeSpan)p.BaseValue;
    }

    #endregion

    #region Properties

    /// <summary>
    /// Gets/Sets the name label for the parameter
    /// </summary>
    public string Name { get; set; }

    /// <summary>
    /// Gets/Sets the Unit object representing the current unit of measure for the parameter.
    /// </summary>
    public Unit CurrentUnit { get; set; }

    /// <summary>
    /// Gets/Sets the value for the parameter in terms of it's base unit of measure
    /// </summary>
    public object BaseValue { get; set; }

    /// <summary>
    /// Gets/Sets the value for the parameter in terms of it's converted unit of measure (depending on the currentUnit setting)
    /// </summary>
    public object UnitValue
    {
        get
        {
            // Perform unit conversion only if the value is numeric and the CurrentUnit value is not null
            if (!(this.CurrentUnit == null) && (this.BaseValue is double || this.BaseValue is int))
            {
                return Convert.ToDouble(this.BaseValue) * this.CurrentUnit.ConversionFactor;
            }
            else
            {
                return this.BaseValue;
            }
        }

        set
        {
            // Perform unit conversion only if the value is numeric and the CurrentUnit value is not null
            if (!(this.CurrentUnit == null) && (this.BaseValue is double || this.BaseValue is int))
            {
                this.BaseValue = Convert.ToDouble(value) / CurrentUnit.ConversionFactor;
            }
            else
            {
                this.BaseValue = value;
            }
        }
    }

    #endregion
}

Looking at the Operators region of the code, I currently have functions that allow the current value of the parameter object to be assigned directly to double, int, bool, DateTime, and TimeSpan objects in the following fashion:

Parameter foo;
double aNumber;

// This part works just fine
aNumber = foo;

But what I would also like to be able to do is the following:

foo = aNumber;

From what I understand, I would have to initialize a new version of the object to assign the value of aNumber to the BaseValue property, and then return the newly created object. The problem is that I want to preserve all the settings of the current instance and simply update the property and assign the current instance back to itself (or some other way). But since the implicit cast needs to be a static method, I'm not sure how to access the instance values directly to simply make the needed edit to the BaseValue and return. Is there an alternative way to get around this without using more complex syntax? I basically want to avoid having to do:

foo.BaseValue = aNumber;

so I can treat the object more like a simple variable, as there are many places in the code where many parameters need to be updated and it would be great to simplify these assignment statements.

-1

What you are looking to do is not possible.

To understand this, you need to realize there are two different types of casting.

For Value types (e.g. double), you are casting the actual value. It is now a different thing with a different identity. Because of this, Value type user defined cast operators that preserve identity are not allowed by the compiler.

For Reference types (e.g. Parameter), you are casting the reference, not the actual value so it is technically possible to preserve the identity (since the object itself has not changed). However, this is only allowed via casts provided by the type system. User defined casts do not preserve identity and always return a new object.

Which brings us to your statement:

foo = aNumber;

You are trying to assign a value type to a reference type.

As you have indirectly realized, there is no "instance" because you are converting from a value type to a reference type. Your operator would look something like this:

static public implicit operator Parameter(double p)
{
    return new Parameter() { BaseValue = p };
}

As you can see, it is obvious that you must create a new instance if you wish to convert between these types.

Lastly, since you want to preserve all other properties, you are essentially describing a setter, which you already have:

foo.BaseValue = aNumber;

Just type .BaseValue. You will be fine.

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