I have a List<object> that I want to access in my class.

The list is a property, and has a get and set.

When I want a single item from the list, I want it to lazy load in the single item I am requesting from a database.

To do this - I want to check if the item being requested exists in the list, if not, I want to add it to the list from the database (if it exists in the database) - then I return the list.

The problem is, I don't think the getter knows what items are being 'gotten', it just knows that the list itself is being requested. So while I can easily lazy load in the entire list, I can't "download and cache as you go".

It was looking very neat too - I could expose the list as a property, and let the property handle all of the loading logic.

In less trivial examples, it's a bit more useless I suppose - like if I wanted to run a query - I would always have to do it against the whole data set otherwise I'd miss results.

Currently, I just download and cache every result from the database when the property is called.

Is there a better approach?

  • Right now you ARE running a query that uses "Select *" to get every items in the datatable. So you just need to add a WHERE to your existing query!!! – jdweng Oct 11 at 4:52
  • @jdweng Not all databases are under our control - I never said I could run custom queries on the database. – Gry- Oct 11 at 5:04
  • @Gry-: Clarify this, please: "When I want a single item from the list". What is the criteria to get an item? Is this indexed acces (e.g., myObj.MyList[3]), or something else (e.q. LINQ myObj.MyList.Single(_ => _.Name == "Mary"))? – Dennis Oct 11 at 5:31
  • @Dennis was just accessing by index: MyList[3]. Was thinking mainly about pagination. I.e. want items 0-9, items 10-19, etc. For queries I was just going to get all. – Gry- Oct 11 at 5:57
  • @Gry-: well, pagination isn't "I want a single item from the list". It isn't indexed list access too. Pagination means that you fetch "pages" (small sequences of data) from database each time user navigates to page. So, what exaclty is your question about? – Dennis Oct 11 at 7:01

Was thinking mainly about pagination. I.e. want items 0-9, items 10-19, etc

Since we're talking about pagination, we must understand, that pagination is neither retrieving single item from the list, nor indexed list access.

Pagination usually allows user to:

  • fetch data from data source using small portions (pages);
  • set page size;
  • fetch next page (next N pages);
  • fetch previous page (previous N pages);
  • fetch particular page (go to page N).

Note, that pagination is about reading data, not about inserting new one.

Basically, pagination requires:

  • paged data source. This can be database, file, in-memory data, that allows to get data portion. E.g. SQL Server allows this via OFFSET... FETCH NEXT in TSQL;
  • paged data source API to access particular page. E.g. IQueryable<T> and its extensions Skip and Take;
  • pagination service. It implements pagination logic;
  • pagination UI controls.

There can be many specific things. Pagination service and UI depends on what framework do you use (ASP .NET, WPF, etc).

Here's the simple pagination service implementation:

/// <summary>
/// Represents paged data source.
/// </summary>
/// <typeparam name="T">
/// Data item type.
/// </typeparam>
public interface IPagedDataSource<T>
{
    /// <summary>
    /// Fetches particular page from data source.
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="pageNumber">
    /// Page number.
    /// </param>
    /// <param name="pageSize">
    /// Page size.
    /// </param>
    /// <returns></returns>
    IReadOnlyList<T> GetPage(int pageNumber, int pageSize);
}

/// <summary>
/// Represents paged data source, built on top of <see cref="IQueryable{T}"/> instance.
/// </summary>
/// <typeparam name="T">
/// Data item type.
/// </typeparam>
public sealed class QueryablePagedDataSource<T> : IPagedDataSource<T>
{
    private readonly IQueryable<T> query;

    /// <summary>
    /// Initializes <see cref="QueryablePagedDataSource{T}"/> instance.
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="query">
    /// <see cref="IQueryable{T}"/> to use as paged data source.
    /// </param>
    public QueryablePagedDataSource(IQueryable<T> query)
    {
        this.query = query;
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Fetches particular page from data source.
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="pageNumber">
    /// Page number.
    /// </param>
    /// <param name="pageSize">
    /// Page size.
    /// </param>
    /// <returns></returns>
    public IReadOnlyList<T> GetPage(int pageNumber, int pageSize) => query
        .Skip(pageNumber * pageSize)
        .Take(pageSize)
        .ToList();
}

/// <summary>
/// Implements basic pagination logic.
/// </summary>
/// <typeparam name="T">
/// Data item type.
/// </typeparam>
public sealed class Paginator<T>
{
    private readonly int pageSize;
    private readonly IPagedDataSource<T> dataSource;
    private readonly IDictionary<int, IReadOnlyList<T>> pages;

    /// <summary>
    /// Initializes <see cref="Paginator{T}"/> instance.
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="dataSource">
    /// Paged data source.
    /// </param>
    /// <param name="pageSize">
    /// Page size.
    /// </param>
    public Paginator(IPagedDataSource<T> dataSource, int pageSize)
    {
        this.dataSource = dataSource;
        this.pageSize = pageSize;
        pages = new Dictionary<int, IReadOnlyList<T>>();
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Gets current page number.
    /// </summary>
    public int CurrentPageNumber { get; private set; }

    /// <summary>
    /// Gets current page.
    /// </summary>
    public IReadOnlyList<T> CurrentPage
    {
        get
        {
            if (pages.Count == 0)
            {
                NavigateTo(0);
            }

            return pages[CurrentPageNumber];
        }
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Navigates to particular page.
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="pageNumber">
    /// Page number to navigate to.
    /// </param>
    public void NavigateTo(int pageNumber)
    {
        CurrentPageNumber = pageNumber;

        if (!pages.ContainsKey(CurrentPageNumber))
        {
            var page = dataSource.GetPage(CurrentPageNumber, pageSize);

            pages.Add(CurrentPageNumber, page);
        }
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Navigates to the next page.
    /// </summary>
    public void Next() => NavigateTo(CurrentPageNumber + 1);

    /// <summary>
    /// Navigates to the previous page.
    /// </summary>
    public void Previous()
    {
        if (CurrentPageNumber > 1)
        {
            NavigateTo(CurrentPageNumber - 1);
        }
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Exports fetched data as a list.
    /// </summary>
    /// <returns>
    /// A list, containing fetched data. Data is ordered by page number.
    /// </returns>
    public List<T> ToList() => pages
        .OrderBy(_ => _.Key)
        .SelectMany(_ => _.Value)
        .ToList();
}

Try to play with it (e.g. create data source from collection using AsQueryable extension). Maybe it will be useful for you.

Note, that there are no null-checking and range-checking.

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