I'm studying web development and now doing the jquery part. I have a question of logic, so that I can understand the logic behind the syntax, so I can understand it better.

Given this logic:

$(document).ready(function() {
  $("p").on({
    mouseenter: function() {
      $(this).css("background-color", "yellow");
    },
    mouseleave: function() {
      $(this).css("background-color", "pink");
    },
    click: function() {
      $(this).css("background-color", "red");
    }
  })
})
  1. Why does the function go inside () after .ready and not like in any other method or function like this: .ready(){ function should be here? }? I mean usually inside () you give a set of arguments and not the code itself, isn't it?

  2. Why do I have to declare an anonymous function and can't simply put the code after mouseenter? It will not be executed anyway before the event occurs, so why do I have to declare anonymous function and have additional set of curly brackets? I mean why do I have to do this:

mouseenter: function() {
  $(this).css("background-color", "yellow");
}

Instead of this:

mouseenter: $(this).css("background-color", "yellow");

Thank you.

up vote 4 down vote accepted

1) Why does the function go inside () after .ready and not like in any other method or function like this: .ready(){ function should be here? }? I mean usually inside () you give a set of arguments and not the code itself, isn't it?

This is because you are providing the anonymous function as an argument to the ready event handler. This function will then be called when the event is fired. This is the callback pattern and is prevalent throughout jQuery.

2) Why do I have to declare an anonymous function and can't simply put the code after mouseenter? It will not be executed anyway before the event occurs, so why do I have to declare anonymous function and have additional set of curly brackets?

If you don't put the logic within a function it will be called immediately, so your assertion is incorrect. If you did it in this manner you would assign the result of the css() call to the mouseenter handler (which is the $(this) jQuery object, which would also be executed in a different scope so this would not be a reference to the element which raised the event, but the object which holds the mouseenter key), instead of the function to run. This is the exact reason you need to wrap the logic in an anonymous function; so that the logic can be executed when required, not immediately.

Both of these questions seem to be due to some confusion over the use of anonymous functions. They can be declared as variables and passed around as such, before being called when needed, for example:

var foo = function() {
  console.log('hello');
}

function doSomethingAfter3Seconds(action) {
  setTimeout(action, 3000);
}

doSomethingAfter3Seconds(foo);

  • Rory thanks a lot. You have directed me in the right path to the callback functions javascriptissexy.com/… . Thank you for the explanation so much. – Undry Oct 11 at 8:51
  • 1
    No problem, glad to help. – Rory McCrossan Oct 11 at 8:51

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