yesterday I stumbled upon some strange Java/Spring/IntelliJ behavior that I was not able to explain.

This is a Spring Boot application made with jdk1.8.0_152.

I ran this simple SQL to fill my DB:

CREATE TABLE TEST_ORGANIZATION
(
    ID NUMBER(19) NOT NULL,
    NAME VARCHAR(255) NOT NULL
);

INSERT INTO TEST_ORGANIZATION (ID, NAME) VALUES ('1', 'test1');
INSERT INTO TEST_ORGANIZATION (ID, NAME) VALUES ('2', 'test2');

Here's my Entity class:

@Data
@NoArgsConstructor
@Entity
public class TestOrganization {

    @Id
    private Long id;

    @NotNull
    private String name;
}

And my JPA Repository:

public interface TestOrganizationRepository extends JpaRepository<TestOrganization, Long> {

    @Query("SELECT new map(id as key, name as value) FROM TestOrganization")
    List<Map<String, String>> findAllAndMapById();
}

And this is where things get confusing. I've written a simple unit test to check for the values, but turns out it fails on second assert:

@Test
public void shouldGetDocumentByName() {
    List<String> values = testOrganizationRepository.findAllAndMapById()
            .stream()
            .flatMap( m -> m.values().stream() )
            .collect( Collectors.toList() );

    assertThat( values ).isNotEmpty();
    assertThat( values ).allMatch( n -> n instanceof String );
}

When debugging with IntelliJ, it shows values like this:

enter image description here

How is this possible? Why am I able to have Long values within a List of String?

Also:

 values.add(1L) // fails to compile
 values.get(0).getClass().name // returns java.lang.String
 values.get(1).getClass().name // returns java.lang.Long
up vote 4 down vote accepted

This is possible because of type erasure in Java. In short, this means that in the runtime Java doesn't know about your generic type, so any List object operates with Object type. The generics are made to have the compile-type safety. But you can read about type erasure in more details, for example here.

The same behavior you can emulate by yourself:

public static void main(String[] args) {
    List<String> list = new ArrayList<>();
    addToList(list);
    System.out.println(list);
}

private static void addToList(List list) {
    list.add(1L);
    list.add(42);
    list.add("String");
    list.add(new Runnable() {
        @Override
        public void run() {}
    });
}

This code works fine as long as you don't try to operate with the list entries as a Strings. But when you add something like:

for (String s : list) {
    System.out.println(s);
}

You will get java.lang.ClassCastException.

So in compile time, you work with List<String>, but in the runtime, Java only knows about List.

  • Thanks! Somehow I forgot about type erasure. Hoped I finally managed to break Java :D – Patryk Krawczyk Oct 11 at 8:32
  • @PatrykKrawczyk no problems! Always glad to help! :) – Sergii Bishyr Oct 11 at 9:12

yes you can, here is small example

public static void main(String args) {
        List objects = new ArrayList();
        objects.add("string");
        objects.add(1L);

        List<String> onlyStrings = objects;

    }

you can cast your non generic list to List if you wish so (you get bunch of compiler warnings).

Consider the following example :

public static void main(String[] args) {
    List a = new ArrayList();
    a.add("a");
    a.add(1L);

    List<String> b = new ArrayList(a);

    System.out.println(b);
}

This outputs

[a, 1]

The above is legal, as java performs type erasure, thus discarding the element type information at runtime. This means that every List is essentially a List and can contain multiple class instances.

public interface List<E> extends Collection<E>

gets converted to

public interface List extends Collection

at compile time.

If E was bound, i.e. E extends MyClass, it would be converted to MyClass.

In your case, you are instantiating a map for every row, without type bounds, you are flatmapping it and then collecting it to a List, which is effectively the same as my example, and thus, legal.

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