I have an array of objects

let myArray = [
    {
        id: 'first',
        name: 'john',
    },
    {
        id: 'second',
        name: 'Emmy',
    },
    {
        id: 'third',
        name: 'Lazarus',
    }
]

and an array

let sorter = ['second', 'third', 'first']

I would like to use lodash sorting method to sort my objects according to their position in sorter. So that the output would be

let mySortedArray = [
    {
        id: 'second',
        name: 'Emmy',
    },
    {
        id: 'third',
        name: 'Lazarus',
    },
    {
        id: 'first',
        name: 'john',
    }
]

Is it possible to do so?

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You can achieve this by using map and find:

let myArray = [
  {
    id: "first",
    name: "john"
  },
  {
    id: "second",
    name: "Emmy"
  },
  {
    id: "third",
    name: "Lazarus"
  }
];

let sorter = ["second", "third", "first"];

let mySortedArray = sorter.map(x => myArray.find(y => y.id === x));

console.log(mySortedArray);

Using lodash you can use _.sortBy

let myArray = [
    {
        id: 'first',
        name: 'john',
    },
    {
        id: 'second',
        name: 'Emmy',
    },
    {
        id: 'third',
        name: 'Lazarus',
    }
]

let sorter = ['second', 'third', 'first']

console.log(_.sortBy(myArray,(i) => {return sorter.indexOf(i.id)})) 
.as-console-wrapper { max-height: 100% !important; top: 0; }
<script src="https://cdnjs.cloudflare.com/ajax/libs/lodash.js/2.4.1/lodash.min.js"></script>

  • 1
    Sorry, that was me not approving cloudflare in umatrix. – Andy Oct 11 at 12:58

If you want to sort the array in-place, you don't need Lodash, you can easily do it with vanilla JavaScript

let myArray = [
    {
        id: 'first',
        name: 'john',
    },
    {
        id: 'second',
        name: 'Emmy',
    },
    {
        id: 'third',
        name: 'Lazarus',
    }
]

let sorter = ['second', 'third', 'first']

//create a lookup table (map) to save looking through the array
const sortLookup = new Map(); 
//populate with element as key - index as value
sorter.forEach((id, index) => sortLookup.set(id, index));

//sort using the indexes of sorter 
myArray.sort((a, b) => sortLookup.get(a.id) - sortLookup.get(b.id))

console.log(myArray)

This is using a Map but the same can easily be accomplished with a plain JavaScript Object {}. You don't even need to pre-compute the lookup myArray.sort((a, b) => sorter.indexOf(a.id) - sorter.indexOf(b.id)) would give the exact same output but it would mean that instead of traversing sorter once for a complexity of O(n), you potentially have O(n^m)or O(n^n) (if both arrays are the same length)

  • This is exactly what I was using, unfortunately, the sort methods behaves differently from one browser to the other, resulting in different sorted arrays. Therefore, using lodash (or any other method that doesn't rely on sort) would solve this issue – Pierre Olivier Tran Oct 11 at 14:40
  • Yes - different browsers do use different sorting algorithms. However, you shouldn't actually be getting different results - the algorithm of choice would still produce the same order, as long as the comparator provides consistent results. If you tried returning logically different values for the same comparison (e.g., compare(a, b) -> 1 compare(b, a) -> 0), then that's inconsistent and you are breaking the sorting interface. The only other issue is that sorting is not necessarily stable - do you items that are equal (according to the comparator) that you still need in specific order? – vlaz Oct 11 at 15:16

Since you have an index array in the case of the sorter you can _.keyBy the main array and then use the sorter to access by index:

let myArray = [ { id: 'first', name: 'john', }, { id: 'second', name: 'Emmy', }, { id: 'third', name: 'Lazarus', } ]
let sorter = ['second', 'third', 'first']

const idMap = _.keyBy(myArray, 'id')
const result = _.map(sorter, x => idMap[x])

console.log(result)
<script src="https://cdnjs.cloudflare.com/ajax/libs/lodash.js/4.17.11/lodash.min.js"></script>

This should perform better since you only do the idMap once and then access it by index.

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