The type given by ReturnType seems to depend on the order the overload signatures are written

function applyChanges1(input: string): number
function applyChanges1(input: number): string
function applyChanges1(input: number | string): number | string {
  return typeof input === "number" ? input.toString() : input.length
}

function applyChanges2(input: number): string
function applyChanges2(input: string): number
function applyChanges2(input: number | string): number | string {
  return typeof input === "number" ? input.toString() : input.length
}

type Ret1 = ReturnType<typeof applyChanges1> // string
type Ret2 = ReturnType<typeof applyChanges2> // number

It seems to take the return type of the last overload signature which seems quite arbitrary. I was expecting both Ret1 and Ret2 to be string | number. Is there a reason for this behaviour?

up vote 2 down vote accepted

As Matt McCutchen points this is a limitation of ReturnType and in general conditional types and multiple overload signatures.

We can however construct a type that will return all overloaded return types for up to an arbitrary number of overloads:

function applyChanges1(input: string): number
function applyChanges1(input: number): string
function applyChanges1(input: number | string): number | string {
return typeof input === "number" ? input.toString() : input.length
}

function applyChanges2(input: number): string
function applyChanges2(input: string): number
function applyChanges2(input: number | string): number | string {
return typeof input === "number" ? input.toString() : input.length
}


type OverloadedRetrunType<T> = 
    T extends { (...args: any[]) : infer R; (...args: any[]) : infer R; (...args: any[]) : infer R ; (...args: any[]) : infer R } ? R  :
    T extends { (...args: any[]) : infer R; (...args: any[]) : infer R; (...args: any[]) : infer R } ? R  :
    T extends { (...args: any[]) : infer R; (...args: any[]) : infer R } ? R  :
    T extends (...args: any[]) => infer R ? R : any


type RetO1 = OverloadedRetrunType<typeof applyChanges1> // string | number 
type RetO2 = OverloadedRetrunType<typeof applyChanges2> // number | string

The version above will work for up to 4 overload signatures (whatever they may be) but can easily (if not prettily) be extended to more.

We can even get a union of possible argument types in the same way:

type OverloadedArguments<T> = 
    T extends { (...args: infer A1) : any; (...args: infer A2) : any; (...args: infer A3) : any ; (...args: infer A4) : any } ? A1|A2|A3|A4  :
    T extends { (...args: infer A1) : any; (...args: infer A2) : any; (...args: infer A3) : any } ? A1|A2|A3 :
    T extends { (...args: infer A1) : any; (...args: infer A2) : any } ? A1|A2  :
    T extends (...args: infer A) => any ? A : any


type RetO1 = OverloadedArguments<typeof applyChanges1> // [string] & [number]
type RetO2 = OverloadedArguments<typeof applyChanges2>  // [number] & [string]
  • Extremely interesting. I've seen a lot of your responses to other typescript questions around which are consistently enlightening. I am curious as to how you acquired all this knowledge haha. – Lionel Tay Oct 11 at 14:02
  • 1
    @LionelTay Not sure .. happened in time. I used to tinker with the compiler a while back and that helped, I also read the PR as each realese comes out, they are very enlightening. Also answering question hears helps me acumulate knowledge :) – Titian Cernicova-Dragomir Oct 11 at 14:05
  • Hmm, so I think that OverloadedRetrunType<F> always passes the first "four overload" test if F is a function type, even if it has fewer than four overload signatures. It's almost a coincidence that the inferred type of R is the right value (it becomes a union of the successfully inferred types). If you tried to break it into separate return types infer R ... infer S ... , you'd get a lot of {} returns. This is frustrating... – jcalz Dec 2 at 1:30

This is a known limitation. The TypeScript team's recommendation is to include a "most general" overload signature as your last overload signature, e.g.:

function applyChanges1(input: string): number
function applyChanges1(input: number): string
function applyChanges1(input: number | string): number | string
function applyChanges1(input: number | string): number | string {
  return typeof input === "number" ? input.toString() : input.length
}

Titian Cernicova-Dragomir has a nicer alternate solution in his answer.

  • Yes, but it can be done without the extra overload, I suggested a way that got picked up in one of the GitHub tickes you commented on: github.com/Microsoft/TypeScript/issues/26048. Is there a reason this is not recommended that you know of ? Except the ugliness :) – Titian Cernicova-Dragomir Oct 11 at 13:38
  • 1
    I guess I was just answering the question about ReturnType and not thinking about alternative solutions, and I had forgotten about your solution anyway. Thanks for posting it. – Matt McCutchen Oct 11 at 13:42

Your Answer

By clicking "Post Your Answer", you acknowledge that you have read our updated terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy, and that your continued use of the website is subject to these policies.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.