14

The kubernetes go client has tons of methods and I can't find how I can get the current CPU & RAM usage of a specific (or all pods).

Can someone tell me what methods I need to call to get the current usage for pods & nodes?

My NodeList:

nodes, err := clientset.CoreV1().Nodes().List(metav1.ListOptions{})

Kubernetes Go Client: https://github.com/kubernetes/client-go

Metrics package: https://github.com/kubernetes/kubernetes/tree/master/staging/src/k8s.io/metrics

As far as I got the metrics server implements the Kubernetes metrics package in order to fetch the resource usage from pods and nodes, but I couldn't figure out where & how they do it: https://github.com/kubernetes-incubator/metrics-server

3 Answers 3

24
+50

It is correct that go-client does not have support for metrics type, but in the metrics package there is a pregenerated client that can be used for fetching metrics objects and assign them right away to the appropriate structure. The only thing you need to do first is to generate a config and pass it to metrics client. So a simple client for metrics would look like this:

package main


import (
    "k8s.io/client-go/tools/clientcmd"
    metrics "k8s.io/metrics/pkg/client/clientset/versioned"
    metav1 "k8s.io/apimachinery/pkg/apis/meta/v1"
)



func main() {
    var kubeconfig, master string //empty, assuming inClusterConfig
    config, err := clientcmd.BuildConfigFromFlags(master, kubeconfig)
    if err != nil{
        panic(err)
    }

    mc, err := metrics.NewForConfig(config)
    if err != nil {
        panic(err)
    }

    mc.MetricsV1beta1().NodeMetricses().Get("your node name", metav1.GetOptions{})
    mc.MetricsV1beta1().NodeMetricses().List(metav1.ListOptions{})
    mc.MetricsV1beta1().PodMetricses(metav1.NamespaceAll).List(metav1.ListOptions{})
    mc.MetricsV1beta1().PodMetricses(metav1.NamespaceAll).Get("your pod name", metav1.GetOptions{})
}

Each of the above methods from metric client returns an appropriate structure (you can check those here) and an error (if any) which you should process according to your requirements.

4
  • Thank you very much! Could you explain how I could have found this?
    – kentor
    Oct 29, 2018 at 9:59
  • 1
    Unfortunately there is no an easy way to find this kind of information. In general if you have an official k8s type there are high chances that a client code will be generated for it as well, but it can be only find by crawling k8s source code or godoc (godoc.org/k8s.io/metrics/pkg/client/clientset/versioned/typed/…).
    – Ottovsky
    Oct 29, 2018 at 16:13
  • Your solution work but how do you manage when you don't know your pod name, you need to find it first then?
    – Emixam23
    Nov 29, 2019 at 19:17
  • Sorry for late reply, but it really depends on your application logic and what pods exactly you want to monitor and how to get their names. I imagine you could just list all pods and then filter them based on your conditions.
    – Ottovsky
    Apr 16, 2020 at 9:05
9

here is an example.

package main

import (
    "fmt"

    metav1 "k8s.io/apimachinery/pkg/apis/meta/v1"
    "k8s.io/client-go/tools/clientcmd"
    metrics "k8s.io/metrics/pkg/client/clientset/versioned"
)

func main() {
    var kubeconfig, master string //empty, assuming inClusterConfig
    config, err := clientcmd.BuildConfigFromFlags(master, kubeconfig)
    if err != nil {
        panic(err)
    }

    mc, err := metrics.NewForConfig(config)
    if err != nil {
        panic(err)
    }
    podMetrics, err := mc.MetricsV1beta1().PodMetricses(metav1.NamespaceAll).List(metav1.ListOptions{})
    if err != nil {
        fmt.Println("Error:", err)
        return
    }
    for _, podMetric := range podMetrics.Items {
        podContainers := podMetric.Containers
        for _, container := range podContainers {
            cpuQuantity, ok := container.Usage.Cpu().AsInt64()
            memQuantity, ok := container.Usage.Memory().AsInt64()
            if !ok {
                return
            }
            msg := fmt.Sprintf("Container Name: %s \n CPU usage: %d \n Memory usage: %d", container.Name, cpuQuantity, memQuantity)
            fmt.Println(msg)
        }

    }
}
2

The API you're looking for in new versions of Kubernetes (tested on mine as of 1.10.7) is the metrics.k8s.io/v1beta1 API route.

You can see it locally if you run a kubectl proxy and check http://localhost:8001/apis/metrics.k8s.io/v1beta1/pods and /nodes on your localhost.

I see where your confusion is though. At the time of writing, it does not look like the metrics/v1beta1 has a generated typed package (https://godoc.org/k8s.io/client-go/kubernetes/typed), and doesn't appear in the kubernetes.ClientSet object.

You can hit all available endpoints directly though the rest.RestClient object, and just specify metrics/v1beta1 as the versionedAPIPath, which will be more work and less convenient than the nicely wrapped ClientSet, but I'm not sure how long it'll take before that API shows up in that interface.

3
  • 1
    Hey @Andrew, thanks for digging into the library. I get your point, but I am absolutely new to Golang so a code sample to achieve the RestClient approach (without a typed response) is highly appreciated. PS: I am a bit confused it has no typed response because kubectl get top pods or kubectl get nodes also returns the resource usage of pods/nodes
    – kentor
    Oct 26, 2018 at 6:56
  • Honestly I find the RestClient a royal pain to use. It's "generic" and doesn't assume you're talking to the actual k8s API, so it requires a whole bunch of additional work to make it happy. You might actually be best pulling the auth tokens and TLS config out of the config you were using for your ClientSet and using it directly with a plain http request.
    – Andrew
    Oct 27, 2018 at 3:27
  • 1
    The way kubectl top works in older versions is to talk to the heapster service directly with this util package. I don't know how it works in the latest versions, haven't dived through the code.
    – Andrew
    Oct 27, 2018 at 3:29

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