#include <fstream> 
#include <vector>
#include <iostream>

int main()
{
    bool bWriteConsole = true;
    std::streambuf *buf;
    std::ofstream outfile;

    if (bWriteConsole)
        buf = std::cout.rdbuf();
    else
    {
        outfile.open("./hello.bin", std::ofstream::binary | std::ofstream::out);
        buf = outfile.rdbuf();
    }

    std::ostream outstream(buf);
    std::vector<char> m_tableBuffer;
    double dValue = 1.2345;
    const void* dBytes = &dValue;
    std::copy(static_cast<const char *>(dBytes), static_cast<const char *>(dBytes) + sizeof(double), std::back_inserter(m_tableBuffer));

    outstream.write((char*)m_tableBuffer.data(), m_tableBuffer.size());

    if (!bWriteConsole)
        outfile.close();
    else
        std::cout << std::flush;

    return 0;
}

I need to add a function to my existing application so that it can output the binary stream to stdout instead of file. The prototype is shown above.

Question> Is there any issue with this implementation? Is there an elegant solution without considering RAII?

Thank you

== Updated based on comments from luk32

void function2()
{
    bool bWriteConsole = true;
    std::ofstream outfile;

    if (!bWriteConsole)
        outfile.open("./hello.bin", std::ofstream::binary | std::ofstream::out);

    std::vector<char> m_tableBuffer;
    double dValue = 1.2345;
    const void* dBytes = &dValue;
    std::copy(static_cast<const char *>(dBytes), static_cast<const char *>(dBytes) + sizeof(double), std::back_inserter(m_tableBuffer));

    if (!bWriteConsole)
    {
        outfile.write((char*)m_tableBuffer.data(), m_tableBuffer.size());
        outfile.close();
    }
    else
    {
        std::cout.write((char*)m_tableBuffer.data(), m_tableBuffer.size());
        std::cout.flush();
    }
}
  • Why not have the funciton simply take std::ostream& and pass in either a std::ofstream, or std::cout? – Angew Oct 11 at 15:29
  • What's wrong with simply using std::ostream::write(reinterpret_cast<char*>(T&), sizeof T)? You have no buffer and no copy, and no need for making a half-copy of cout by creating another ostream with same rdbuf. cout is an ostream already. Is there a reason you copy memory content into intermediary buffer? – luk32 Oct 11 at 15:33
  • @luk32, for output directly to stdout, I have no reason to buffer the result. However, for output directly to file, I have to buffer the result in memory first, then flush all contents to file in the end. – q0987 Oct 11 at 15:36
  • @luk32, I was reading this post stackoverflow.com/questions/366955/… – q0987 Oct 11 at 15:37
  • Why? There is essentially no difference between ofstream in cout. The question you linked has this line "Although this invalid for many reasons, I would like to achieve [...]". I tend to agree with the sentiment. It might be an XY problem. ofstream and cout(because it's ostream) are both buffered. They both provide flush. – luk32 Oct 11 at 15:38
up vote 1 down vote accepted

My version would something more akin to this:

#include <iostream>
#include <fstream>

void function2(bool bWriteConsole)
{
    std::ofstream outfile;

    if (!bWriteConsole)
        outfile.open("./hello.bin", std::ofstream::binary | std::ofstream::out);

    double dValue = 1.2345;

    // writing out
    std::ostream& out = bWriteConsole ? std::cout : outfile;
    out.write(reinterpret_cast<char*>(&dValue), sizeof dValue);
    out.flush();
}

Writing code is 2 lines, 3 if you really want to flush. outfile.close() would flush as well, so there is no harm in flushing unconditionally versus your approach. File will get closed when outfile goes out of scope so it doesn't have to be written unless you really want to manually close the file before some further processing. Here it's superfluous (RAII goodness comes into play here).

Aaand maybe refactor writing:

template<typename T>
void dump(T val, std::ostream& out ) {
    out.write(reinterpret_cast<char*>(&val), sizeof val);
    out.flush();
}

void function2(bool bWriteConsole)
{
    std::ofstream outfile;

    if (!bWriteConsole)
        outfile.open("./hello.bin", std::ofstream::binary | std::ofstream::out);

    double dValue = 1.2345;
    dump(dValue, bWriteConsole ? std::cout : outfile);
    // writing out
}

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