Good afternoon all,

I have a string of blank separated words. I need to find the words from that string that matches an alphanumeric pattern, partial or whole word. I need words made only of alphanumeric characters.

To make my purpose clearer I have the string:

'foo bar quux foofoo foobar fooquux barfoo barbar barquux ' .
'quuxfoo quuxbar quuxquux [foo] (foo) {foo} foofoo barfoo ' .
'quuxfoo foo2foo foo2bar foo2quux foo2foo bar2foo quux2foo'

and I want to find all words with 'foo' inside (only once per word) but not those with special characters (non alpha) like "[foo]", "{foo}"...

I have done this with the following piece of code in Perl:

my $s=
'foo bar quux foofoo foobar fooquux barfoo barbar barquux quuxfoo quuxbar quuxquux ' .
'[foo] (foo) {foo} foofoo barfoo quuxfoo foo2foo foo2bar foo2quux foo2foo bar2foo quux2foo';
my @m = ($s=~/(\w+foo|foo\w+|^foo|foo$)/g) ;
say "@m";
say "Number of sub-strings matching the pattern: ", scalar @m;
print( sprintf("%02d: ",$_),
       ($s=~/(\w+foo|foo\w+|^foo|foo$)/g)[$_],
       qq(\n) )
    for (0..@m-1);

I get the result I want:

foo foofoo foobar fooquux barfoo quuxfoo foofoo barfoo quuxfoo foo2foo foo2bar foo2quux foo2foo bar2foo quux2foo
Number of sub-strings matching the pattern: 15 
00: foo
01: foofoo
02: foobar
03: fooquux
04: barfoo
05: quuxfoo
06: foofoo
07: barfoo
08: quuxfoo
09: foo2foo
10: foo2bar
11: foo2quux
12: foo2foo
13: bar2foo
14: quux2foo

But if I need (and I will) to add more patterns to search for in a more complex string it quickly becomes messy and I get confused with the succession of alternate patterns ('|').

Is there is someone to help me writing a shorter/cleaner pattern regexp to delimit the 'foo' (or any other) word/sub-word in a way that it could be written in one single pattern?

Thank you in advance.

GM

Strawberry 5.022 on W7/64, but I think it's fairly generic to any Perl above 5.016 or even 5.008;


I found the solution of dawg (and steffen too) suitable for me. Not the most readable, the grep one is more in accordance with my level of Perl, but I think, as pure regexp based, more able to handle future add of words with word limits handling.

$s=~/(?:(?<=\h)|^)(\w*foo\w*)(?=\h|$)/g


(?:(?<=\h)|^)  Assert either after a \h (horizontal space) or at start of line ^
(\w*foo\w*)    Capture a 'word' with 'foo' and only \w characters (or, [a-zA-Z0-9_] characters)
(?=\h|$)       Assert before either a \h horizontal space or end of line $

I would like to write here down what I understood of it so that you can correct me if I'm wrong before I intend to expand it for my actual needs.

(?:         # You start a non capturing group.
(?<=        # You start a lookbehind (so non capturing BY NATURE, am I right ?, because
            # if not, as it is being enclosed in round-brackets '()' it restarts to be
            # capturing even inside a non capturing group, isn't it?)
 \h         # In the lookbehind you look for an horizontal space (could \s have been used
            # there?)
 ^          # in the non capturing group but outside of the lookbehind you look for the
            # start of string anchor. Must not be present in the lookbehind group because
            # it requires a same length pattern size and ^ has length==0 while \h is
            # non zero.
\w*foo\w*   # You look for foo within an alphanum word. No pb to have '*' rather than '+'
            # because your left (and right, that we'll see it down) bound has been well
            # restricted.
(?=         # You start a lookforward pattern (non capturing by nature here again, right?),
            # to look for:
\h or $     # horiz space or end of string anchor. However the lookaround size is
            # different here as $ is still 0 length (as ^ anchor) and \h still non
            # zero. "AND YET IT MOVES" (I tested your regexp and it worked) because
            # only the lookbehind has the 'same-size' pattern restriction, right?

Thank you for your help, all of you, after that last point I won't bother you any longer with my little problems and consider my question fully answered. G.

  • Do you want to get foobar from (foobar) or shouldn't that match at all? – steffen Oct 11 at 15:40
  • @steffen: no, you are right, I don't want to have (foo) nor [foo] nor {foo} nor ;foo;, etc. – Gilles Maisonneuve Oct 12 at 19:27
  • Hey, move the second part to a new answer and accept it ;) – steffen Oct 15 at 21:12
up vote 4 down vote accepted

It depends: if you want to get foobar from (foobar), it's easy. You just match foo with optional word characters before and after, and then on both sides a word boundary \b (which could be begin of input or some non-word character):

my @m = ($s=~/(\b\w*foo\w*\b)/g);
print( sprintf("%02d: ",$_),
    ($s=~/(\b\w*foo\w*\b)/g)[$_],
    qq(\n) )
for (0..@m-1);

Output:

00: foo
01: foofoo
02: foobar
03: fooquux
04: barfoo
05: quuxfoo
06: foo
07: foo
08: foo
09: foofoo
10: barfoo
11: quuxfoo
12: foo2foo
13: foo2bar
14: foo2quux
15: foo2foo
16: bar2foo
17: quux2foo

If not, then it's a bit more difficult. Here I'd match begin-of-input or a space, then foo surrounded by optional word characters and then we need a (zero-length) assertion which requires a whitespace or end-of-input:

my @m = ($s=~/(?:^|\s)(\w*foo\w*)(?=\s|$)/g);
print( sprintf("%02d: ",$_),
    ($s=~/(?:^|\s)(\w*foo\w*)(?=\s|$)/g)[$_],
    qq(\n) )
for (0..@m-1);

Output:

00: foo
01: foofoo
02: foobar
03: fooquux
04: barfoo
05: quuxfoo
06: foofoo
07: barfoo
08: quuxfoo
09: foo2foo
10: foo2bar
11: foo2quux
12: foo2foo
13: bar2foo
14: quux2foo
  • In order to exclude ( before the word or ) after (so parens as word-boundary) I'd find it clearer to make your own word boundary ([^()...]) in the first example (in a variable with qr) – zdim Oct 11 at 16:32

You can split your string and filter the array:

use strict;
use warnings;

my $s=
'foo bar quux foofoo foobar fooquux barfoo barbar barquux quuxfoo quuxbar quuxquux ' .
'[foo] (foo) {foo} foofoo barfoo quuxfoo foo2foo foo2bar foo2quux foo2foo bar2foo quux2foo';

my @res = grep {/foo/ && !/\W/}  split /\s/, $s;

print join(" ", @res);
  • 1
    This is the right direction. Keep things simple. Just remember that the definition of 'word character' as used by regex is letters, digits, and underscore, so you may need to construct a character class if you have more specific requirements. – Grinnz Oct 11 at 17:27
  • Nice! Thanks. I did not get it at first glance. Now I think I understand it better. I won't make progress in regexps with that but it solves my pb right away. I'm balanced between quick solution and learning. I'll try to do both. Really, as Pelr gurus say, there is more than one way to do it. – Gilles Maisonneuve Oct 12 at 21:23

Perhaps filter the unwanted words first then use grep against the filtered words:

use strict;
use warnings;

my $s=
'foo bar quux foofoo foobar fooquux barfoo barbar barquux quuxfoo quuxbar quuxquux ' .
'[foo] (foo) {foo} foofoo barfoo quuxfoo foo2foo foo2bar foo2quux foo2foo bar2foo quux2foo';

my @words = ( $s=~/(?:(?<=\h)|^)(\w+)(?=\h|$)/g );

my @foos = grep(/foo/, @words);

while (my ($i, $v) = each @foos) {
    printf "%02d: %s\n", $i,$v;
}

Prints:

00: foo
01: foofoo
02: foobar
03: fooquux
04: barfoo
05: quuxfoo
06: foofoo
07: barfoo
08: quuxfoo
09: foo2foo
10: foo2bar
11: foo2quux
12: foo2foo
13: bar2foo
14: quux2foo

Alternatively, you can combine the filtering on a list of the words split by horizontal spaces and testing the resulting word is all alphanumeric:

@foos=grep {/foo/ && /^\w+$/} split /\h/, $s;  # same result

Or,

@foos=grep {/^\w*foo\w*$/} split /\h/, $s; 

Or, in a single regex:

@foos=($s=~/(?:(?<=\h)|^)(\w*foo\w*)(?=\h|$)/g);

As requested in comments, with:

$s=~/(?:(?<=\h)|^)(\w*foo\w*)(?=\h|$)/g


(?:(?<=\h)|^)  Assert either after a \h (horizontal space) or at start of line ^
(\w*foo\w*)    Capture a 'word' with 'foo' and only \w characters (or, [a-zA-Z0-9_] characters)
(?=\h|$)       Assert before either a \h horizontal space or end of line $

The only tricky part is (?:(?<=\h)|^). It is illegal in Perl to have a non-fixed width lookback such as (?<=\h|^) since ^ is a zero width and \h is not. (The regex (?<=\h|^) is legal in the PCRE library interestingly.) So (?:(?<=\h)|^) breaks the two assertion into one group.

  • Thank you for @foos=($s=~/(?:(?<=\h)|^)(\w*foo\w*)(?=\h|$)/g); It worked for me. However I honestly did not understand half of your regexp... Would you be kind enough to explain it a little so that I can modify it for my own use(s) it in the future? TIA. – Gilles Maisonneuve Oct 11 at 20:10
  • @GillesMaisonneuve: Explanation added. – dawg Oct 11 at 21:11

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