In an array that starts with 1,9,9,0,9,7,5,1 each number after the 4th one is the last digit of the sum of the previous 4 numbers ( 1 + 9 + 9 + 0 = 19, 9 is the next digit), calculate when will the pattern 1,9,9,0 happen again in the array. I'm having problems finding the pattern, here is my current code.

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

int main()
{
    int n[500];
    n[0]=1,n[1]=9,n[2]=9,n[3]=0,n[4]=9;
    int suma,i=5,b=0,c=0;
do
    {
        b=i;
        suma=0;
        suma=suma+(n[i-1]+n[i-2]+n[i-3]+n[i-4]); 
        n[i]=suma%10;
        cout << n[i] << "::" << endl;
        if(n[i-1]==0 && n[i-2]==9 && n[i-3]==9 && n[i-4]==1)
        {
            cout << "break"; break;
        }
        i++;
    }while(i!=1000);
    return 0;
}
  • 1
    maybe the pattern wont come again, maybe you need to go beyond i==1000. Whats the question? – user463035818 Oct 11 at 16:13
  • 1
    btw your array has 500 elements but you loop till 1000 – user463035818 Oct 11 at 16:14
  • I need to find the occurence again, and I have tried till the number 500000, up to that it makes no sense, this is a real simple task for a real programmer, I'm still learning and I don't know how to recognize the numbers 1,9,9,0 in a sequence, is this how you do it ? – Michael Scofield Oct 11 at 16:36
  • Input the number as a string. Keeping the number as a string will allow you to use the std::string::find function and others. Also, number as string will allow you to accept numbers that are too large to fit in the largest numeric data type. – Thomas Matthews Oct 11 at 16:43
  • @ThomasMatthews I dont really agree with your suggestion. The numbers OP is dealing with all have a single digit. I would rather suggest to use a queue that at any time holds only 4 numbers, though that wouldnt really make the task easier – user463035818 Oct 11 at 17:41

The only problem with your code is that you access the array out of bounds. Your array is

int n[500];

and then the loop goes till

}while(i!=1000);

If you fix that it does find a solution!

Anyhow, I thought it is an interesting problem and actually wrote this before realizing that your code is already correct (apart from the out-of-bounds):

#include <iostream>
#include <array>

using quad = std::array<int,4>;

int get_next_number(const quad& q) { return (q[0]+q[1]+q[2]+q[3])%10; }
quad get_next(const quad& q) { return { q[1],q[2],q[3],get_next_number(q) }; }

int main() {
    quad init{1,9,9,0};
    int counter = 0;
    quad current = get_next(init);
    while (init != current) { 
        ++counter;
        current = get_next(current);
    }   
    std::cout << counter;
}

You dont need to store all numbers when all you need at any time are the last four entries. By using an std::array that holds only the last 4 numbers also the comparison is more readable.

Note that @kiran Biradar s solution is more efficient, because above I unecessarily do shift all the numbers in each step while his code just assigns one element in each step.

  • 1
    But your code is more readable. – kiran Biradar Oct 11 at 19:06
  • @kiranBiradar yes, though I think your solution is nicer and I dont want to steal it, so I suggest you a small change for your code – user463035818 Oct 11 at 19:15
  • That was nicely written thank you :) – kiran Biradar Oct 11 at 19:26
  • I understand that OP was about array but efficient solution does not take arrays at all. Plain ints are way better quads. ;) coliru.stacked-crooked.com/a/72ff5d8688ad3f0e – Öö Tiib Oct 11 at 23:28
  • @ÖöTiib thats nice. My first try used a struct with four ints but it had too much boilerplate. Using one int is a nice trick – user463035818 Oct 12 at 9:17

One problem I see here is.

You are not looping enough to get the sequence. For that you need larger array.

When you declare smaller array and loop more than that you invoke undefined behavior because of array out of bound access.

Solution:

Either you declare larger array and loop enough

Or

As told in the comment section repetition can occur any time hence you cannot have array with predefined length as you don't know how many repetition will occur.

Hence you only need array of length 5 and use % operator with while(1) loop to solve the problem .

The clue is you need to store the sum after the 4th element hence (i+4)%5 will get you the place where sum need to be stored and you access the 1st,2nd,3rd and 4th element same way

(i+0)%5 --> will get you the first element
(i+1)%5 --> will get you the second element
(i+2)%5 --> will get you the third element
(i+3)%5 --> will get you the fourth element

Complete code might look like below.

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

int main()
{
    int n[5];
    n[0]=1,n[1]=9,n[2]=9,n[3]=0;
    int suma,i=0;
    do
    {
        suma=0;
        suma=suma+(n[(i+0)%5]+n[(i+1)%5]+n[(i+2)%5]+n[(i+3)%5]); 
        n[(i+4)%5]=suma%10;
        cout << n[(i+0)%5] <<n[(i+1)%5]<<n[(i+2)%5]<<n[(i+3)%5]<<n[(i+4)%5]<< "::" << endl;
        if(n[(i+0)%5]==1 && n[(i+1)%5]==9 && n[(i+2)%5]==9 && n[(i+3)%5]==0 && i > 0)
        {
            cout << "break"; break;
        }
        i++;
    }while(1);
    return 0;
}

or As you see the above code is less readable.

You can make it readable by using a lambda as below.

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

int main()
{
    int n[5];
    n[0]=1,n[1]=9,n[2]=9,n[3]=0;
    int suma,i=0;
    do
    {
        auto p = [&](int offset) -> int& { return n[(i+offset)%5]; };
        suma=p(0)+p(1)+p(2)+p(3); 
        p(4)=suma%10;        
        if(p(0)==1 && p(1)==9 && p(2)==9 && p(3)==0 && i >0)
        {
            cout << "break \n"; break;
        }
        i++;
    }while(1);
    std::cout << i;
    return 0;
}

and compile using -std=gnu++1y flag.

For your information repetition is occurring at 1560th iteration

  • 1
    Hmm so did you explain why OP did not find the sequence till the number 500000? – Öö Tiib Oct 11 at 17:04
  • Some how I missed most essential part of the answer. Now updated. Thank you. – kiran Biradar Oct 11 at 17:18
  • Thank you for your response, the code works but I only put the array to a number of 500 when I should have put it much higher, I'm all for optimizing code, so do you think that your code is better/faster than mine? Mine works just fine like yours except the array is much bigger. – Michael Scofield Oct 11 at 17:39
  • @MichaelScofield my code is clearly way to go since I don't need to have larger array. – kiran Biradar Oct 11 at 17:42
  • "when you do this you are writing at the 6th location instead of 5th" this should be fine, as OP already initialized the 5th element with the correct number so it doesnt really matter if starting the iteration with digits 0 till 4 or 1 till 5 – user463035818 Oct 11 at 18:33

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