Say I have a Binary data frame like this one:

[1,1,0,0,1,0
 1,1,1,0,1,1
 0,0,1,0,0,1
 1,1,1,0,1,1
 0,1,0,1,0,0
 1,1,0,1,1,0]

I would like to extract patterns of 1s which repeat most between rows. In this example, I would like to know that [1,1,x,x,1,x] occurs frequently, i.e there are lots of rows where these features fo together.

What is the most efficient algorithm to do this? I actually have a data frame with ~4000 columns and ~1M rows, so any brute force method would be way too inefficient.

For simplicity, let's assume i'm only interested in patterns up to 4 such 1s anywhere in the row. Not interested in patterns of 0s, also my matrix is very sparse.

edit:

How sparse - about 1% are 1s.

And how frequently will the patterns occur? - I have no idea... let's say I'm only interested in patterns which occur a thousand times at least... which is about 0.1% of my number of rows...

  • How sparse? How frequently? – m69 Oct 11 at 18:36
  • how sparse - about 1% are 1s. and how frequently will the patterns occur? - i have no idea... let's say i'm only interested in patterns which occur a thousand times at least... which is about 0.1% of my number of rows... – Oren Matar Oct 11 at 20:41
  • 2
    You might also consider browsing stats.SE, eg stats.stackexchange.com/q/86318 – Frank Oct 11 at 21:23
up vote 2 down vote accepted

What is the most efficient algorithm to do this?

so any brute force method would be way too inefficient.

First of all, the brute force method is too costly. In the brute force method, if the length of each transaction is N, we must test 2^N patterns. Counting the number of occurrence of each pattern by brute force algorithm is thus unrealistic.

There are mainly two well known effective algorithms, the Apriori algorithm and the FP growth algoritm, for mining frequent patterns. Although the most efficient algorithm for the current problem should be determined by tests with your practical input data, these algorithms are always strong candidates in such a problem.


1. Apriori Algorithm

The apriori algorithm was introduced by R. Agrawal and R. Srikant in 1994. Various GitHub repositories are providing implementations of it.

Basic overview is as follows.
Let's label each rows by i = 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 to distinguish “items”:

  i = 0,1,2,3,4,5

    [ 1,1,0,0,1,0, 
      1,1,1,0,1,1, 
      0,0,1,0,0,1, 
      1,1,1,0,1,1, 
      0,1,0,1,0,0, 
      1,1,0,1,1,0 ]  

Next, we introduce brace-notation {...}. For instance, the first row has a pattern {0,1,4} and the second one has a pattern {0,1,2,4,5}.

First we consider 6 minimal patterns, C1 = { {0},{1},{2},{3},{4},{5} } and count how many times these patterns are occurred. In this example, every patterns of them exist and we get

F1 = { ({0};4), ({1};5), ({2};3), ({3};2), ({4};4), ({5};3) },

where the left and right values mean item and frequency, respectively. Next, we make size 2 unions of pairs of elements of F1 and get next size candidates C2 = { {0,1},{0,2},{0,3},{0,4},{0,5},{1,2},{1,3},{1,4},{1,5},{2,3},{2,4},{2,5},{3,4},{3,5},{4,5} }. Counting occurrences of them, we get...

F2 = { ({0,1};4), ({0,2};2), ({0,3};1), ({0,4};4), ({0,5};2),
       ({1,2};2), ({1,3};2), ({1,4};4), ({1,5};2),
       ({2,3};0), ({2,4};2), ({2,5};3),
       ({3,4};1), ({3,5};0),  
       ({4,5};2) } ...? 

In this example, {2,3} and {3,5} do not exist and thus we remove them. In addition, we can also remove patterns {0,3} and {3,4} because they occur just only once and are not frequent. Thus we get

F2 = { ({0,1};4), ({0,2};2), ({0,4};4), ({0,5};2),
       ({1,2};2), ({1,3};2), ({1,4};4), ({1,5};2),
       ({2,4};2), ({2,5};3),
       ({4,5};2) }.

Next, we again make size 3 unions of pairs of elements of F2 and get next candidates:

C3 = { {0,1,2}, {0,1,4}, {0,1,5}, {0,1,3}, {0,2,4}, {0,2,5}, {0,4,5},   
       {1,2,3}, {1,2,4}, {1,2,5}, {1,3,4}, {1,3,5}, {1,4,5}, 
       {2,4,5} } ...?

Here, we already know that {2,3} and {3,5} do not exist. So we can remove these patterns. This step is called pruning which increases the efficiency of this algorithm. Furthermore, we also already know that {0,3} and {3,4} are not frequent. Thus our next candidate is

C3 = { {0,1,2}, {0,1,4}, {0,1,5}, {0,2,4}, {0,2,5}, {0,4,5},   
       {1,2,4}, {1,2,5}, {1,4,5}, 
       {2,4,5} }.

Then we count occurrences of them and get

F3 = { ({0,1,2};2), ({0,1,4};4), ({0,1,5};2), ({0,2,4};2), ({0,2,5};2), ({0,4,5};2),  
       ({1,2,4};2), ({1,2,5};2), ({1,4,5};2),  
       ({2,4,5};2) ).  

Repeating this process, we get

F4 = { ({0,1,2,4};2), ({0,1,2,5};2), ({0,1,4,5};2), ({0,2,4,5};2),  
       ({1,2,4,5};2) }, 

and finally

F5 = { ({0,1,2,4,5};2) }.  

F6 is empty and thus at this time we have finished counting the number of occurrence of each frequent pattern. The results are table F1 ~ F5. We can determine the most frequent patterns from these tables. If we impose your condition about the number of 1s, the answers are {0},{1},{4},{0,1},{0,4},{1,4} and {0,1,4}. These results are summarized to a single set {0,1,4}.

There are various ideas to improve the apriori algorithm:

  • Preprocessing: In the present case, removing 0s and reducing the memory size of database in the first access will improve the following candidates generating process.
  • If we want to know only most frequent patterns, we can throw away less frequent patterns in each Fk.
  • Direct Hashing and Pruning (DHP)
  • bitmap, ...

2. FP growth Algorithm

The apriori algorithm is intuitive and simple. But, in the apriori algorithm we still must generate many candidates and test them. To avoid such a costly generating process, Frequent Pattern growth algorithm was proposed by J. Han, J. Pei and Y. Yin in 2000. Various GitHub repositories again exist.

In this algorithm, first, we count the frequency of each item and sort them in decreasing order. For instance, in the present example the result is

(1;5),(4;4),(0;4),(5;3),(2;3),(3;2)

where the left and right values mean item and frequency, respectively.

Next, we sort each pattern of row in this order.

  i = 0,1,2,3,4,5

    [ 1,1,0,0,1,0,  --> {1,4,0} 
      1,1,1,0,1,1,  --> {1,4,0,5,2}
      0,0,1,0,0,1,  --> {5,2}
      1,1,1,0,1,1,  --> {1,4,0,5,2}
      0,1,0,1,0,0,  --> {1,3}
      1,1,0,1,1,0 ] --> {1,4,0,3}

Then we construct the so-called FP tree as follows. FP tree is a prefix tree containing the compete information for frequent pattern mining. Even if the input database is very large one, the resulted FP tree is usually compact and fit in main memory.

FPTree

Traversing tree nodes with slightly complicated but effective counting algorithm explained in the above original paper, we can count frequency of each pattern. For instance, let us consider the following path from the red circle node 3 to the root. This path is starting from 3 and represents a conditional pattern base (CPB) of 3. Patterns obtained along this red line is as follows and their frequencies are commonly 1 because of CPB of 3:

enter image description here

One more example is given below:

enter image description here

In this manner, starting from all nodes one by one, we can find all patterns and their frequencies. Implementation of this algorithm is not so difficult and this is my quick DEMO with C++.

Impose your condition about the number of 1s, we again find {0,1,4} as the most frequent pattern on this tree.

There are also a lot of interesting research related to FP tree based mining.

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